Found this T today in desert

Dexter

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
19
Found this T locally in san diego near the desert. Can anyone say for sure what it is?





 

Dexter

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
19
haha i know its Aphonopelma but i was hoping to narrow down which one. Talonawd believes it to be hentzi I think. Are there many different kinds in San Diego hills areas?
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Aug 15, 2005
Messages
268
haha i know its Aphonopelma but i was hoping to narrow down which one. Talonawd believes it to be hentzi I think. Are there many different kinds in San Diego hills areas?
I don't believe A. hentzi extends out to San Diego. No one can say for sure what it is until the genus is revised (and most people will never be able to even when it is), but it's probably part of the "eutylenum-complex."
 

Teal

Arachnoemperor
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Jan 11, 2009
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4,112
Aphonopelma sp. "San Diego Hills Area"


;)


This! :D

GORGEOUS! I can't wait until I can do another trip to So Cal and go T hunting!

Sorry... no ideas on the ID. I don't recall there being anything other than A. hentzi around here though?
 

killy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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May 20, 2009
Messages
250
I'm no expert, but this looks like my very first T, which I caught in the San Bernardino foothills when I was just a kid (dad made me release it back into the wild), so I'm going with Aphonopelma eutylenum. And I'm envious of you because my current collection will never be complete until it includes an A. eutylenum (just for old times' sake).
 

Merfolk

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
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Dec 13, 2005
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1,330
It looks almost large enough to be mature but no boxing glove... might be a girl (or an immature male from a larger species) however, your T is not about to die of old age :)
 

malevolentrobot

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
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310
oh native Aphonopelma sp.'s, you will soon be out where i live too... {D

nice find! everything i've read so far about central-socal Ts is that they are Aphonopelma eutylenum/iodus, but i'm nowhere near an expert on any of this stuff.
 
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TalonAWD

Arachnoprince
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Jul 28, 2007
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I change my opinion of the tarantula. After seeing in person, its has to be the Aphonopelma chalcodes (Desert blonde). Really light carapace with almost matching legs. The carapace is practically white but a tannish color.
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
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268
I change my opinion of the tarantula. After seeing in person, its has to be the Aphonopelma chalcodes (Desert blonde). Really light carapace with almost matching legs. The carapace is practically white but a tannish color.
Can't be. Their range doesn't extend that far unless it was a stowaway or released pet. Aside from that, color isn't very useful in determining species in Aphonopelma. It can be some sort of a guide, but range is more definitive (as definitive as you can be when talking about this genus).
 

TalonAWD

Arachnoprince
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Can't be. Their range doesn't extend that far unless it was a stowaway or released pet. Aside from that, color isn't very useful in determining species in Aphonopelma. It can be some sort of a guide, but range is more definitive (as definitive as you can be when talking about this genus).
Yeah I'm going on by color. Its a really light coloration. What is their range exactly.
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
268
Yeah I'm going on by color. Its a really light coloration. What is their range exactly.
The "eutylenum" and "chalcodes" complexes should be separated by the Colorado River. I don't think there's an overlap between them. Not so sure about the populations north or east of the Mogollon Rim though.
 
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