Fossorial T's Personal Opinion

coolnweird

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
175
Megaphobema robustum!! Most regulars on here probably know how crazy I am about this species. Beautiful red/white/black coloration, great feeding response, get 8"+, and they have spikes on their legs along with the normal urticating hairs. They dig complex tunnels, but mine comes out most mornings/evenings

PXL_20211001_003814628.PORTRAIT.jpg
 

ConstancePlants

Arachnopeon
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2021
Messages
16
Megaphobema robustum!! Most regulars on here probably know how crazy I am about this species. Beautiful red/white/black coloration, great feeding response, get 8"+, and they have spikes on their legs along with the normal urticating hairs. They dig complex tunnels, but mine comes out most mornings/evenings

View attachment 404582
Really beautiful!!!
 

TimmmyTarantula

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
18
I have a Female Chilobrachys Dysclous and a female ceratogyrus Marshall. My marshalli is one of my favorite ts she will spend most of the day at the mouth of her burrow and comes out almost every night. I really love her subtle unique pattern and of course you cant go wrong with the horn, great feeding response, mine is neither aggressive or defensive and surprisingly easy when ive had to rehouse. My C. Dysclous is my least favorite t i own but i still love her. She is the definition of a pet hole I have not seen her in over a year. She hides deep in her burrow only barely visible through a little spot where she moved the dirt away from the glass. She is very very defensive fast as lightning I just feed her water and leave her alone. So this is something to consider when getting into fossorials you can end up with a pet hole as well as fossorials can generally be harder to rehouse than other ts. If you want to house them properly you need to accommodate for deep substrate this isnt difficult but its all food for thought
 

ConstancePlants

Arachnopeon
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2021
Messages
16
The r
I have a Female Chilobrachys Dysclous and a female ceratogyrus Marshall. My marshalli is one of my favorite ts she will spend most of the day at the mouth of her burrow and comes out almost every night. I really love her subtle unique pattern and of course you cant go wrong with the horn, great feeding response, mine is neither aggressive or defensive and surprisingly easy when ive had to rehouse. My C. Dysclous is my least favorite t i own but i still love her. She is the definition of a pet hole I have not seen her in over a year. She hides deep in her burrow only barely visible through a little spot where she moved the dirt away from the glass. She is very very defensive fast as lightning I just feed her water and leave her alone. So this is something to consider when getting into fossorials you can end up with a pet hole as well as fossorials can generally be harder to rehouse than other ts. If you want to house them properly you need to accommodate for deep substrate this isnt difficult but its all food for thought
the rehousing is definitely a little intimidating so I’ll have to have all hands on deck when that day comes 😬😂
 

TimmmyTarantula

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
18
The r


the rehousing is definitely a little intimidating so I’ll have to have all hands on deck when that day comes 😬😂

At first rehousing fossorials can be a bit stressful especially if they are OW species. I have devised safe a way to rehouse so far it's been 100% successful but thats always subject to change lol I'd be happy to share with anyone who is interested. I only have 2 fingers on each hand so if I can do it successfully literally anyone can do it😁 Patience practice and respect for the T is all you need
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
755
My favorite fossorial species that I've owned so far is my C. marshalli. Such unique looking spiders with a great feeding response. Also, Chilobrachys huahini. Heavy webbers with an intense feeding response. Lightning fast. IMG_20211119_205259515~2.jpg
 

Craig73

Arachnodemon
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jun 2, 2016
Messages
757
The r


the rehousing is definitely a little intimidating so I’ll have to have all hands on deck when that day comes 😬😂
If you‘re lucky enough the T will provide an amazing view into its underground layer. My P. muticus sling has an amazing burrow and just build a second entrance yesterday. I can see where it is 100% of the time. Interesting to know it spends most of the time in the tunnel leading to the surface, and usually at the bottom when eating.

C1017E67-76FD-44EB-8722-27E88978D21A.jpeg
 

ConstancePlants

Arachnopeon
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2021
Messages
16
At first rehousing fossorials can be a bit stressful especially if they are OW species. I have devised safe a way to rehouse so far it's been 100% successful but thats always subject to change lol I'd be happy to share with anyone who is interested. I only have 2 fingers on each hand so if I can do it successfully literally anyone can do it😁 Patience practice and respect for the T is all you need
Do share! I’d love any advice even though rehousing will be far in the future
 

TimmmyTarantula

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
18
You would need a few supplies, an appropriately sized clear plastic cup , 3-4 chopsticks and a cheap paint brush (watercolor art style not a big house painting brush).

Some ts might have multiple burrow entrances but for explaining lets just say your t has one burrow entranc. Place the cup over the burrow entrance so when the t leaves the burrow it will run up into the cup. Next just wait a little bit 5, 10 minutes if your lucky the t being interested by the vibrations might come out on its own but let's say it doesn't come out.

With the cup over the burrow use the paint brush to "tickle" lightly stimulating the substrate or webbing right around the burrow where your cup is. This simulates a struggling insect. You might have to slightly tilt the cup up to use the brush right around the burrow entrance. Be patient and gentle but at some point while doing this the t will emerge partially or fully. Lucky it goes into the cup otherwise the next step. Now for the chopsticks and do this part gently and very slowly especially if it's a smaller t. You're going to insert the chopsticks one at a time at an angle into the substrate so that they go into the burrow basically blocking the t from going back into its burrow. You don't want to hurt the t by poking it but if you do it very slowly they will move their body and legs out of the way. It might take one stick or could take more it depends on the t size of the burrow etc you'll just have to determine that part yourself. Because the t was only accessible from its front now with the sticks you've put something behind it that you can control. Lucky the movement will cause it to move into the cup if it still doesn't want to go gently tease the sticks in an upward direction and this will get the t out. Lastly once in the cup slide something like a card under the cup to trap the t in the cup and bam you went fishing for a tarantula. Hope this was a good enough description sorry it was so long. I attached a diagram I drew im not an artist 😆 20211127_195723.jpg
 

Craig73

Arachnodemon
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jun 2, 2016
Messages
757
You would need a few supplies, an appropriately sized clear plastic cup , 3-4 chopsticks and a cheap paint brush (watercolor art style not a big house painting brush).

Some ts might have multiple burrow entrances but for explaining lets just say your t has one burrow entranc. Place the cup over the burrow entrance so when the t leaves the burrow it will run up into the cup. Next just wait a little bit 5, 10 minutes if your lucky the t being interested by the vibrations might come out on its own but let's say it doesn't come out.

With the cup over the burrow use the paint brush to "tickle" lightly stimulating the substrate or webbing right around the burrow where your cup is. This simulates a struggling insect. You might have to slightly tilt the cup up to use the brush right around the burrow entrance. Be patient and gentle but at some point while doing this the t will emerge partially or fully. Lucky it goes into the cup otherwise the next step. Now for the chopsticks and do this part gently and very slowly especially if it's a smaller t. You're going to insert the chopsticks one at a time at an angle into the substrate so that they go into the burrow basically blocking the t from going back into its burrow. You don't want to hurt the t by poking it but if you do it very slowly they will move their body and legs out of the way. It might take one stick or could take more it depends on the t size of the burrow etc you'll just have to determine that part yourself. Because the t was only accessible from its front now with the sticks you've put something behind it that you can control. Lucky the movement will cause it to move into the cup if it still doesn't want to go gently tease the sticks in an upward direction and this will get the t out. Lastly once in the cup slide something like a card under the cup to trap the t in the cup and bam you went fishing for a tarantula. Hope this was a good enough description sorry it was so long. I attached a diagram I drew im not an artist 😆 View attachment 404594
So this would be an oops, right?…:troll:

F06BED84-D13E-4A03-A2CC-8EA20ECDEBBD.jpeg
 

ConstancePlants

Arachnopeon
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2021
Messages
16
You would need a few supplies, an appropriately sized clear plastic cup , 3-4 chopsticks and a cheap paint brush (watercolor art style not a big house painting brush).

Some ts might have multiple burrow entrances but for explaining lets just say your t has one burrow entranc. Place the cup over the burrow entrance so when the t leaves the burrow it will run up into the cup. Next just wait a little bit 5, 10 minutes if your lucky the t being interested by the vibrations might come out on its own but let's say it doesn't come out.

With the cup over the burrow use the paint brush to "tickle" lightly stimulating the substrate or webbing right around the burrow where your cup is. This simulates a struggling insect. You might have to slightly tilt the cup up to use the brush right around the burrow entrance. Be patient and gentle but at some point while doing this the t will emerge partially or fully. Lucky it goes into the cup otherwise the next step. Now for the chopsticks and do this part gently and very slowly especially if it's a smaller t. You're going to insert the chopsticks one at a time at an angle into the substrate so that they go into the burrow basically blocking the t from going back into its burrow. You don't want to hurt the t by poking it but if you do it very slowly they will move their body and legs out of the way. It might take one stick or could take more it depends on the t size of the burrow etc you'll just have to determine that part yourself. Because the t was only accessible from its front now with the sticks you've put something behind it that you can control. Lucky the movement will cause it to move into the cup if it still doesn't want to go gently tease the sticks in an upward direction and this will get the t out. Lastly once in the cup slide something like a card under the cup to trap the t in the cup and bam you went fishing for a tarantula. Hope this was a good enough description sorry it was so long. I attached a diagram I drew im not an artist 😆 View attachment 404594
This is great! Thank you!
 

OddballSpoods

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 14, 2021
Messages
6
4DD43059-88F7-47D6-9CC4-48CD3C540936.jpeg
My Golden blue legged baboon. I just love peaking in and seeing him deep in his burrows with everything all webbed up.

Outside of him the C. DarlingI are really cool 😎
 

Neonblizzard

Arachnomoron
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 3, 2021
Messages
615
You would need a few supplies, an appropriately sized clear plastic cup , 3-4 chopsticks and a cheap paint brush (watercolor art style not a big house painting brush).

Some ts might have multiple burrow entrances but for explaining lets just say your t has one burrow entranc. Place the cup over the burrow entrance so when the t leaves the burrow it will run up into the cup. Next just wait a little bit 5, 10 minutes if your lucky the t being interested by the vibrations might come out on its own but let's say it doesn't come out.

With the cup over the burrow use the paint brush to "tickle" lightly stimulating the substrate or webbing right around the burrow where your cup is. This simulates a struggling insect. You might have to slightly tilt the cup up to use the brush right around the burrow entrance. Be patient and gentle but at some point while doing this the t will emerge partially or fully. Lucky it goes into the cup otherwise the next step. Now for the chopsticks and do this part gently and very slowly especially if it's a smaller t. You're going to insert the chopsticks one at a time at an angle into the substrate so that they go into the burrow basically blocking the t from going back into its burrow. You don't want to hurt the t by poking it but if you do it very slowly they will move their body and legs out of the way. It might take one stick or could take more it depends on the t size of the burrow etc you'll just have to determine that part yourself. Because the t was only accessible from its front now with the sticks you've put something behind it that you can control. Lucky the movement will cause it to move into the cup if it still doesn't want to go gently tease the sticks in an upward direction and this will get the t out. Lastly once in the cup slide something like a card under the cup to trap the t in the cup and bam you went fishing for a tarantula. Hope this was a good enough description sorry it was so long. I attached a diagram I drew im not an artist 😆 View attachment 404594
Slightly derailing the thread but could you do this with cups over the exits then flood the T out instead? I know this apparently ends up with a cross tarantula bit seems a safer option than digging a spicy OW up
 

thomlennon

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 31, 2020
Messages
16
I have a Female Chilobrachys Dysclous and a female ceratogyrus Marshall. My marshalli is one of my favorite ts she will spend most of the day at the mouth of her burrow and comes out almost every night. I really love her subtle unique pattern and of course you cant go wrong with the horn, great feeding response, mine is neither aggressive or defensive and surprisingly easy when ive had to rehouse. My C. Dysclous is my least favorite t i own but i still love her. She is the definition of a pet hole I have not seen her in over a year. She hides deep in her burrow only barely visible through a little spot where she moved the dirt away from the glass. She is very very defensive fast as lightning I just feed her water and leave her alone. So this is something to consider when getting into fossorials you can end up with a pet hole as well as fossorials can generally be harder to rehouse than other ts. If you want to house them properly you need to accommodate for deep substrate this isnt difficult but its all food for thought
My C. Dysclous is the same way. The only times I’ve ever fully seen it is during a rehousing. Mine makes awesome dirt towers when it digs a new tunnel so that’s fun I guess
 
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