Forbidden love </3

MrsHaas

Arachnoangel
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
861
Just wanted to share something happy, since I know my posts for the last monthish have all been quite sad ones...

My MF P. striata has a boyfriend!!! :kiss:

..... And he's a MM P. rufilata :wideyed:

He was tappity tappity tapping at her all night last night. I love that sound!! Lol

How tragic it is, forbidden love! :arghh:

If only there was a way to get him laid without knocking her up... ?
 

antinous

Pamphopharaoh
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
1,464
Make some 'condoms' for his pedipalps, that way it's a win-win ;) unless he gets eaten
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,301
"In Ovid's Metamorphoses, Pyramus and Thisbe are two lovers in the city of Babylon who occupy connected houses/walls, forbidden by their parents to be wed, because of their parents' rivalry. Through a crack in one of the walls, they whisper their love for each other. They arrange to meet near Ninus' tomb under a mulberry tree and state their feelings for each other. Thisbe arrives first, but upon seeing a lioness with a mouth bloody from a recent kill, she flees, leaving behind her veil. When Pyramus arrives he is horrified at the sight of Thisbe's veil, assuming that a wild beast has killed her. Pyramus kills himself, falling on his sword in proper Babylonian fashion, and in turn splashing blood on the white mulberry leaves. Pyramus' blood stains the white mulberry fruits, turning them dark. Thisbe returns, eager to tell Pyramus what had happened to her, but she finds Pyramus' dead body under the shade of the mulberry tree. Thisbe, after a brief period of mourning, stabs herself with the same sword. In the end, the gods listen to Thisbe's lament, and forever change the colour of the mulberry fruits into the stained colour to honour the forbidden love."

If there's a lesson to be learned, it's that you should breed them and then stab them with a sword. Or something like that, I'm not great at moral dilemmas.
 

MrsHaas

Arachnoangel
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
861
"In Ovid's Metamorphoses, Pyramus and Thisbe are two lovers in the city of Babylon who occupy connected houses/walls, forbidden by their parents to be wed, because of their parents' rivalry. Through a crack in one of the walls, they whisper their love for each other. They arrange to meet near Ninus' tomb under a mulberry tree and state their feelings for each other. Thisbe arrives first, but upon seeing a lioness with a mouth bloody from a recent kill, she flees, leaving behind her veil. When Pyramus arrives he is horrified at the sight of Thisbe's veil, assuming that a wild beast has killed her. Pyramus kills himself, falling on his sword in proper Babylonian fashion, and in turn splashing blood on the white mulberry leaves. Pyramus' blood stains the white mulberry fruits, turning them dark. Thisbe returns, eager to tell Pyramus what had happened to her, but she finds Pyramus' dead body under the shade of the mulberry tree. Thisbe, after a brief period of mourning, stabs herself with the same sword. In the end, the gods listen to Thisbe's lament, and forever change the colour of the mulberry fruits into the stained colour to honour the forbidden love."

If there's a lesson to be learned, it's that you should breed them and then stab them with a sword. Or something like that, I'm not great at moral dilemmas.
How very eloquent!
 
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