Food for crickets?

CEOAirsoft

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
8
For the past few weeks I've been feeding my 100 crickets or so with potato slices because it provides food and water. But they seem to be growing pretty slow. I was thinking about switching over to fish flakes. Would fish flakes be better? And if I do use them how should I provide water?
 

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Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Messages
41
I would keep providing water in the form of fruit and veggies. Potato, watermelon, carrot, apple, and cucumber all work well. Personally, I toss in a bit of cat kibble when I want to give my crickets a protein boost, but I know many people use fish flakes for the same purpose.
 

Aquarimax

Arachnoprince
Joined
Mar 1, 2014
Messages
1,057
Mine get a basic diet of chicken growth crumble, fish food pellets, fruits and vegetables. They grow well on this diet.
 

Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,584
mine get carrots, potatoes, some sort of calcium flake like food, and water.
 

Ranitomeya

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 11, 2012
Messages
250
Potato slices are not much more than water and starch. They do not provide any significant source of protein and crickets need protein to grow. Fish flakes, fish pellets, and chicken feed are all good sources of protein. Use fruit instead of potatoes so that they have a source of fresh vitamins. Make sure to keep processed foods away from water sources so that they don't get moldy quickly.
 

darkness975

dream reaper
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Aug 31, 2012
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I feed mine fish flakes. For water I have a small bowl (fish flake container lid) with water that I soak a piece of paper towel in. I change the paper towel daily. They suck the water right out of it and they cannot drown because they have an easy foothold to get out.

No issues for the last however many millenniums I have kept them that way.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
Has anyone tried Fluker's Orange Cube Complete Cricket Diet? It appears to have food and water together.

I have been providing the feed that I buy from my online crickets supplier. But I have noticed that while I see my crickets in the water container all the time, I rarely see them in the food container. Of course I go through the crickets so fast that it may not matter that much anyway.

I tried the veggies for a while but it brought in too many gnats. I also made my own home made food once with nuts, seeds, wheat germ, and dog food. This was more work than it was worth with the same results. It probably would save me money if I did it over the long haul.
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
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Sep 14, 2013
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5,082
Mine get apple, carrot, peas, sweetcorn, oats and fish food.
 

darkness975

dream reaper
Arachnosupporter +
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Aug 31, 2012
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3,909
Mine get what I wrote above. They definitely eat the food. Especially when I first bring a fresh batch home. Apparently not a single pet store knows how to keep crickets alive (or cares to) because they are always dehydrated and starving.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
Mine get what I wrote above. They definitely eat the food. Especially when I first bring a fresh batch home. Apparently not a single pet store knows how to keep crickets alive (or cares to) because they are always dehydrated and starving.
I need to try the fish flakes.
 

RTTB

Arachnoprince
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
1,765
I've used the Flukers Orange Cubes with success for 100 or so crickets at a time.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
I've used the Flukers Orange Cubes with success for 100 or so crickets at a time.
I kind of like the idea that it makes only one container required for the feeding / watering process. That leaves more dark spaces in the enclosure for crickets to hang out.

But I just looked at the ingredient list and am not so sure about it. I guess it is kind of like getting processed food for ourselves in the grocery store. I never understand why people need to put food color in things. I suppose part of those are preservatives.

Water, Carageenan, Soya Protein, Dried Brewer's Yeast, Dried Kelp, Calcium Carbonate, Potassium, Sorbate, Ascorbic Acid, Citric Acid, Yellow #6 Food Color
 
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