First tarantula; help decide on a species?

CommanderBacon

Arachnobaron
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If you can afford it, the G pulchra is amazing. You will immediately have the Bentley of beginner T’s, and it will always look incredible.

All four species are great options, though, so it really just comes down to what you like best. As others have mentioned, Brachypelma tend to kick hairs, so if you have sensitive skin, I don’t recommend starting off with one of those.
 

FloraNoir

Arachnopeon
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Thank you all for your replies! I found it really helpful to see different peoples input and personal experiences! I decided on getting a G. pulchra. I've found some available and will have one in the next week or two. Pics to come! :)
 

Dorifto

He who moists xD
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Thank you all for your replies! I found it really helpful to see different peoples input and personal experiences! I decided on getting a G. pulchra. I've found some available and will have one in the next week or two. Pics to come! :)

Now read all the information you can about the pulchra, I suggest you to use this forum, internet is full of garbage.

Give it a propper enclosure with plenty of substrate, hydes and ventilation. If you make a nice setup, they will use it, and you will see your T wandering the enclosure instead of having a pet hole.

Mine at her preferred spots:

IMG_20200522_174457.jpg
IMG_20200619_202052.jpg
IMG_20200522_173954.jpg

Regarding the substrate, I'd recomend you topsoil over coco fiber or peat, the reason? Pulchras are bulldozers, love to move substrate and dig good burrows, so a subtrate that holds the shape firmly is mandatory. Coco fiber and peat moss become very loose if they are dry, so they are more prone to collapse than a substrate that is more compact like topsoil. Also it will keep the moisture more homogeneously, so you don't need to moist the substrate so often. You should keep some parts of the enclosure moist and others more dry, so the T can choose.

Feel free to ask any question!
 

Arachnophobphile

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Dec 24, 2018
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Thank you all for your replies! I found it really helpful to see different peoples input and personal experiences! I decided on getting a G. pulchra. I've found some available and will have one in the next week or two. Pics to come! :)
What are pulchras going for in the U.K.? Should be cheaper than the U.S.
 

Arachnophobphile

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Dec 24, 2018
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Now read all the information you can about the pulchra, I suggest you to use this forum, internet is full of garbage.

Give it a propper enclosure with plenty of substrate, hydes and ventilation. If you make a nice setup, they will use it, and you will see your T wandering the enclosure instead of having a pet hole.

Mine at her preferred spots:

View attachment 391909
View attachment 391910
View attachment 391911

Regarding the substrate, I'd recomend you topsoil over coco fiber or peat, the reason? Pulchras are bulldozers, love to move substrate and dig good burrows, so a subtrate that holds the shape firmly is mandatory. Coco fiber and peat moss become very loose if they are dry, so they are more prone to collapse than a substrate that is more compact like topsoil. Also it will keep the moisture more homogeneously, so you don't need to moist the substrate so often. You should keep some parts of the enclosure moist and others more dry, so the T can choose.

Feel free to ask any question!
Coco Fiber works great. I never had a tunnel collapse, ever. As long as you pack it down good you won't have any issues.

I bought my sexed female for about 40€
That is alot cheaper geez
 
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Dorifto

He who moists xD
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Coco Fiber works great. I never had a tunnel collapse, ever. As long as you pack it down good you won't have any issues.
The problem is when your pulchra moves so much substrate that converts packed coco fiber in a fluffy stuff 🤣🤣🤣.

I had two collapses in her first enclosure, and it was packed down very well while it was moist. Coco fiber works well, but I prefer topsoil by a mile. It's waay cheaper, holds the shape much better and keeps the moisture more homogeneously. In the coco fiber the top layer dries much faster than the bottom one, and you can have a very dry top layer while the bottom one is soaked. Topsoil keeps it more controlled.
 

CommanderBacon

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I paid $70 for my unsexed G pulchra, which has turned out to be male, but I recently picked up a nice sized female in a lot I purchased from someone leaving the hobby and I paid $350 for her.

That was offset by the subadult M balfouri communal I also purchased for $140 and the two other rares I scored tho.
 

Arachnophobphile

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The problem is when your pulchra moves so much substrate that converts packed coco fiber in a fluffy stuff 🤣🤣🤣.

I had two collapses in her first enclosure, and it was packed down very well while it was moist. Coco fiber works well, but I prefer topsoil by a mile. It's waay cheaper, holds the shape much better and keeps the moisture more homogeneously. In the coco fiber the top layer dries much faster than the bottom one, and you can have a very dry top layer while the bottom one is soaked. Topsoil keeps it more controlled.
Weird, my T. albo bulldozers had tunnels everywhere up to 3 inches dls before staying out full time. I never had a collapse but I also super pack the coco probably more than most people
 

Charliemum

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After keeping jumping spiders and mantids for a while, I've decided to get my first tarantula.
I'm on the fence between four different species
- B. hamorii
- G. pulchra
- G. rosea
- T. albopilosus
I want to know which one you guys would recommend the most out of these species. (I plan on getting a sling. I know the G. pulchra's are slow growers but that doesn't bother me.)
I've done a lot of research and I know that any spider can be fast or kick hairs, but in your experience, which species am I most likely to get a calm/chill spider with?
I don't plan on holding my spider because I don't want to stress him or her out, but I am an ex-arachnophobe so I would prefer something slow so that it doesn't bolt when I'm unboxing the sling/rehousing. I've read that some T's are known to move about the dirt in their enclosure and be seen most of the time, are any of these sp. known for doing that?
Lastly, I have been known to have allergies/easily irritated skin, so a T that is least likely to kick hairs would be best. (I will be wearing gloves when cleaning the enclosure etc.
If a species I haven't mentioned seems to fit this list more, I'm happy to take suggestions, too!
Thanks in advance for your replies :)
I got my first 4/5 months ago I went with B baumgarteni, then A chalcodes & G.rosea & P. sazimai, then C.virsicolour & T.albopilosus, then a A. geniculata, I was glad I started with Brachypelmas but i believe any of the t's u picked would be fine starter t's. Get all 4 you'll probably end up with all 4 anyways 😆 highly addictive this hobby I was only getting one 🤣🤣🤣
 
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zeeman

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May 12, 2011
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104
For the species you've listed, I would vote the Curly Hair.

All of the species are classics and wonderful. Aside from the Rosea I own pretty much all of them in my limited collection.

I recommend the Curly Hair for a few reasons. 1.) Of the species listed, it seems to be the best or fastest grower.
2.) They are voracious eaters and have no issues taking down equal size prey. The others comparably are more finicky.
3.) Even as a spiderling, if undisturbed, will create a burrow but spend more of their time out. The other species as spiderlings are on / off. The pulchra's I've had as slings tended to hide more. The B auratum (kind of an hamorii) would often sit out but see item 1.

The only reason I would vote differently is if you absolutely wanted to handle. Supposedly the pulchra as a whole is one of the more handleable terrestrial T's. That said it comes down to individual temperament and Curly Hairs can do the same. You also won't find much support on this forum. Which is why I don't count it in my above list.
 

FloraNoir

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Jul 16, 2021
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Congratulations!!! 😁

Now to be paaaaaaaaaaaaaaatient 😂

I'd take those branches for more security. Is that "rock" water dish?
No, the "rock" is a piece of cork bark. There is a little water dish!, just isn't visible in the photo. I was watching her move and quickly realised the little sticks (it's actually dried moss) were making her trip so they're already been removed :)

Wow you might even get a molt out of them in the next year 😅 that one is ready to pop
Her abdomen is huge, right?! The breeder I bought her from gave me a free L. parahybana (only about 1cm if that) So at least I'll get to see somebody molt sometime soon! I didn't plan on getting a free second T so I've been frantically reading posts and watching videos all day about them! Apparently they have pretty bad urticating hairs which makes me very nervous since that was something I was trying to avoid. Any advice for a sling that size and that species would be welcome! :)
 
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Dorifto

He who moists xD
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Her abdomen is huge, right?! The breeder I bought her from gave me a free L. parahybana (only about 1cm if that) So at least I'll get to see somebody molt sometime soon! I didn't plan on getting a free second T so I've been frantically reading posts and watching videos all day about them! Apparently they have pretty bad urticating hairs which makes me very nervous since that was something I was trying to avoid. Any advice for a sling that size and that species would be welcome! :)
Yo will be amazed how much they grow compared to the pulchra 🤣🤣🤣

Keep them warm, with a little bit moist substrate, good ventilation and some good hides. For feeding micro red runners are perfect. They don't pose any risk and create good feeding response. Try not to feed the roach too much, this way they stay at smaller size much longer.
 
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