First tarantula; help decide on a species?

FloraNoir

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 16, 2021
Messages
5
After keeping jumping spiders and mantids for a while, I've decided to get my first tarantula.
I'm on the fence between four different species
- B. hamorii
- G. pulchra
- G. rosea
- T. albopilosus
I want to know which one you guys would recommend the most out of these species. (I plan on getting a sling. I know the G. pulchra's are slow growers but that doesn't bother me.)
I've done a lot of research and I know that any spider can be fast or kick hairs, but in your experience, which species am I most likely to get a calm/chill spider with?
I don't plan on holding my spider because I don't want to stress him or her out, but I am an ex-arachnophobe so I would prefer something slow so that it doesn't bolt when I'm unboxing the sling/rehousing. I've read that some T's are known to move about the dirt in their enclosure and be seen most of the time, are any of these sp. known for doing that?
Lastly, I have been known to have allergies/easily irritated skin, so a T that is least likely to kick hairs would be best. (I will be wearing gloves when cleaning the enclosure etc.
If a species I haven't mentioned seems to fit this list more, I'm happy to take suggestions, too!
Thanks in advance for your replies :)
 

YungRasputin

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
166
G. Rosea - what i started with; they’re a super solid, easy going and hardy species - excellent choice to start with and learn from
 

Matt Man

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2017
Messages
1,229
B. hamorii - if you are gonna start, go with the classic
T albo as #2

all of them are great except Roseas have become harder to find and more expensive
 

DomGom TheFather

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
1,599
Whichever one you like best.
Curlies are great but don't overlook G. pulchripes if you haven't considered it.
 

USNGunner

Arachnoknight
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2020
Messages
150
My grandson went with B. Hamorii and it's a gorgeous super chill T. I on the other hand went GBB and Hapalapous sp. Columbia (lg). The pumpkin patch is skittish, but Carnage is very mellow. Go figure.

So, my advice is, go with floats "YOUR" boat. If it's female, you are going to be with it for a long time. So, "choose well grasshopper!" ;)
 

Arachnophobphile

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
229
After keeping jumping spiders and mantids for a while, I've decided to get my first tarantula.
I'm on the fence between four different species
- B. hamorii
- G. pulchra
- G. rosea
- T. albopilosus
I want to know which one you guys would recommend the most out of these species. (I plan on getting a sling. I know the G. pulchra's are slow growers but that doesn't bother me.)
I've done a lot of research and I know that any spider can be fast or kick hairs, but in your experience, which species am I most likely to get a calm/chill spider with?
I don't plan on holding my spider because I don't want to stress him or her out, but I am an ex-arachnophobe so I would prefer something slow so that it doesn't bolt when I'm unboxing the sling/rehousing. I've read that some T's are known to move about the dirt in their enclosure and be seen most of the time, are any of these sp. known for doing that?
Lastly, I have been known to have allergies/easily irritated skin, so a T that is least likely to kick hairs would be best. (I will be wearing gloves when cleaning the enclosure etc.
If a species I haven't mentioned seems to fit this list more, I'm happy to take suggestions, too!
Thanks in advance for your replies :)
All 4 are good choices. They are hardy and long lived.

There's literally a ton of different T's to choose from. Also don't be fooled by a general description of any genus and species overall temperament. I have 2 T. albopilosus a 4 inch dls and a 5 inch. The 4 inch is sweet as pie, the 5 inch prefers to bite you fast with no threat pose first so....yeah.....each T has their own personality and also can change from molt to molt.

Urticating Setae Rules:
1. Do not stick your face with eyes and mouth wide open with no protection into your T's enclosure.

Seriously...there's a ton of info on urticating bristles, look it up. Understand the risk if you get any in your eye/s. On your skin is bad, in your respiratory system even worse and in your eye...well worse case scenario you'll need eye surgery so use protection.

Don't be worried just practice common sense especially on rehouses, best wishes.
 

Thane1616

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 1, 2021
Messages
67
After keeping jumping spiders and mantids for a while, I've decided to get my first tarantula.
I'm on the fence between four different species
- B. hamorii
- G. pulchra
- G. rosea
- T. albopilosus
I want to know which one you guys would recommend the most out of these species. (I plan on getting a sling. I know the G. pulchra's are slow growers but that doesn't bother me.)
I've done a lot of research and I know that any spider can be fast or kick hairs, but in your experience, which species am I most likely to get a calm/chill spider with?
I don't plan on holding my spider because I don't want to stress him or her out, but I am an ex-arachnophobe so I would prefer something slow so that it doesn't bolt when I'm unboxing the sling/rehousing. I've read that some T's are known to move about the dirt in their enclosure and be seen most of the time, are any of these sp. known for doing that?
Lastly, I have been known to have allergies/easily irritated skin, so a T that is least likely to kick hairs would be best. (I will be wearing gloves when cleaning the enclosure etc.
If a species I haven't mentioned seems to fit this list more, I'm happy to take suggestions, too!
Thanks in advance for your replies :)
I made a different list for myself last week but it had G. pulchra in it. The species is amazing looking but being slow growers and people charging $100 or more in the US made them fall on my list. I ended up going with a suggestion made by someone else in my thread which was any Avicularia sp., I ended up with Avicularia Avicularia but I still want that Pulchra eventually :D
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
Joined
Sep 14, 2014
Messages
2,008
I liked all your choices. Kept thinking "why not get one of each?" :cool: For a first T choice, it looks like you've done your homework and selected good starter Ts to select from. As long as you also learned proper housing and husbandry -- you're off to a good start! Plus you'll have a wealth of good information here on Arachnoboards to assist you on this amazing journey. Good luck -- join the T club! :)

(really, I found my first T amazing (G rosea) -- so any T you pick is going to be so cool and amazing just because it's your first, imo)
 

LD50

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Messages
103
I would go with T. albopilosus since it's the fastest growing of the 4. They're super hardy, cheap, and are definitely eating machines.
 

The Grym Reaper

Arachnoreaper
Active Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
4,516
I'm on the fence between four different species
- B. hamorii
- G. pulchra
- G. rosea
- T. albopilosus
I want to know which one you guys would recommend the most out of these species. (I plan on getting a sling. I know the G. pulchra's are slow growers but that doesn't bother me.)
T. albopilosus is the best readily available beginner species you can get IMO (G. pulchripes is a fairly close 2nd). Generally calm with a better appetite/growth rate that the rest of the species on the list.

I've read that some T's are known to move about the dirt in their enclosure and be seen most of the time, are any of these sp. known for doing that?
Grammostola species seem to constantly be moving dirt around, my pulchra constantly digs random holes and fills its water dish with substrate. My pulchripes female used to do the same when she was smaller but not anymore.

Lastly, I have been known to have allergies/easily irritated skin, so a T that is least likely to kick hairs would be best. (I will be wearing gloves when cleaning the enclosure etc.
B. hamorii is the most likely to be a hair kicker although it's basically a case of "flip a coin to see if you get a hair kicker or not" (I keep every species from the genus and the only hair kicker out of the lot is my male smithi).
 

LucN

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
228
Rosea for least available and being underrated. Albopilosus for fastest growth, insane level of Floof and greatest appetite. Hamorii for classic status and extreme longevity. Pulchra for sleek and shiny black look.

Take your pick. You can't go wrong with any of them.
 

Neonblizzard

Arachnomoron
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 3, 2021
Messages
494
My G. pulchra - haven't seen for 6 months

G. Rosea - Good but as a sling you'll have died of boredom before it looks remotely like a G. Rosea

My B. Hamorii - cute but absolute flick machine

Gotta be T. Albopilosus for me
 

Thearachnidaddict

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2021
Messages
102
There is a super beginner freindly species that is great for handling and great around kids! Its called atrax robustus
 
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