First tarantula for a beginner?

TheShrubbery

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 30, 2016
Messages
66
The two species I have researched and looked at are:

aphonopelma chalcodes
and
brachypelma smithi

The problem is, both of them are slow growing and I want something bigger but has the same docile nature to it. So, I would like a tarantula that is big, quick growing yet docile so it is handleable. Can you guys recommend any?

P.S. I have handled a Goliath bird eater before and I currently own two Giant house spiders, if that is of any interest. Yes I realize tarantula's are different, and need their own seperate blah blah as I said I have researched both of the species I listed.
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
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Jul 3, 2016
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124
Check out brachypelma albopilosum, same docile/ calm demeanor, grows a bit faster than some of the other brachys and gets a tad bigger as well. They are also fairly inexpensive you should be able to buy a sub adult female for under $100. Where as a sub adult female B smithi would be 200-250 most commonly.
 

shining

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 15, 2011
Messages
755
The two species I have researched and looked at are:

aphonopelma chalcodes
and
brachypelma smithi

The problem is, both of them are slow growing and I want something bigger but has the same docile nature to it. So, I would like a tarantula that is big, quick growing yet docile so it is handleable. Can you guys recommend any?

P.S. I have handled a Goliath bird eater before and I currently own two Giant house spiders, if that is of any interest. Yes I realize tarantula's are different, and need their own seperate blah blah as I said I have researched both of the species I listed.
Why not just buy a more mature and grown specimen of these species you have researched?

Also, what do you seek to achieve in handling them?
 

Alana

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 26, 2016
Messages
20
Handling really isn't recommended for any tarantula. If you're considering a B. smithi then TheSpiderShop have juveniles and an adult female in stock so you wouldn't have to wait ages for it to grow.
 

TheShrubbery

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 30, 2016
Messages
66
Ceymann, maybe I should edit my post but I am British aha.

Anything better looking than the species you recommended? Thank you anyhow :)
 

TheShrubbery

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Aug 30, 2016
Messages
66
If I have a pet, of any kind no matter what it is. I at least want to look at it in full detail on my hand rather than in its enclosure. That goes for all pets really, it doesn't necessarily mean I am going to do it 24/7.
I don't exactly want a pet that I can never touch, where's the fun in that? I'm a practical person, I like to get stuck in there hands on. [Insert joke of finger being lopped off by tarantula ehheheheheehehehe]

That's why I specified "handleable" species. @Alana and @shining
 

EulersK

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Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
To everyone - let's not turn this into a debate about handling, yeah? :shifty: It's not evil, so long as it's done responsibly. Especially with these beginner species. He's not looking to hold an OW, let's leave it at that.

Unfortunately, many of the docile, large species aren't exactly fast growing. And many aren't very pretty either.

C. cyaneopubescens is beautiful, fast growing, and a beginner species... but not docile at all. Extremely skittish.
B. albopilosum is docile, relatively fast growing (for a brachy), but you apparently don't like the look of it.
B. vagans is fast growing and gorgeous, but again, it's skittish and not docile.
G. pulchripes is fast growing for a Grammostola, but still not fast. They get quite large and are generally docile.

I'd look into something from the Euathlus genus, specifically E. sp. "Red" or E. sp. "Yellow". They're not overly gorgeous, but they're docile, grow relatively quickly, and easy to care for.
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
115
If I have a pet, of any kind no matter what it is. I at least want to look at it in full detail on my hand rather than in its enclosure. That goes for all pets really, it doesn't necessarily mean I am going to do it 24/7.
I don't exactly want a pet that I can never touch, where's the fun in that? I'm a practical person, I like to get stuck in there hands on. [Insert joke of finger being lopped off by tarantula ehheheheheehehehe]

That's why I specified "handleable" species. @Alana and @shining
I don't think a tarantula is the pet for you if that's your approach to pets. Tarantulas are like fish: look, don't touch. They are instinct-driven wild animals. They don't understand what's happening when you handle them apart from being swooped in to an unfamiliar situation in which they must remain hyper-aware. Any stimuli they experience could be perceived as a threat, even simply breathing on them! And while handling poses somewhat of a risk to the handler (getting hairs kicked at you, sustaining a bite), it is a matter of life or death for the spider. Most tarantulas will not survive a fall of more than a few inches. Please think about this before you decide to get a tarantula!
 

YagerManJennsen

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
508
To everyone - let's not turn this into a debate about handling, yeah? :shifty: It's not evil, so long as it's done responsibly. Especially with these beginner species. He's not looking to hold an OW, let's leave it at that.

Unfortunately, many of the docile, large species aren't exactly fast growing. And many aren't very pretty either.

C. cyaneopubescens is beautiful, fast growing, and a beginner species... but not docile at all. Extremely skittish.
B. albopilosum is docile, relatively fast growing (for a brachy), but you apparently don't like the look of it.
B. vagans is fast growing and gorgeous, but again, it's skittish and not docile.
G. pulchripes is fast growing for a Grammostola, but still not fast. They get quite large and are generally docile.

I'd look into something from the Euathlus genus, specifically E. sp. "Red" or E. sp. "Yellow". They're not overly gorgeous, but they're docile, grow relatively quickly, and easy to care for.
Exactly what I would say. I say if you want to handle just do it close to the ground and know the risks involved. A. chalchodes is I believe Eulers' favorite behining T.
 

TheShrubbery

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@Moonohol then why do people particularly choose docile species to handle, then breeders sell them off and market them as "Handleable" species? You're being a bit narrow minded. As I said I have handled a Goliath bird eater before, it was not mine and it was well tempered. I do fully realize the risk of a bite and the hairs or more over barbs being flung at you. I do enjoy watching any spiders species, (if its big enough to see with the naked eye) eat, feed, breed or general activities. "EulersK" is right in what he says, if I want to handle it, its my choice at the end of the day.

You're making it out as if a tarantula's can never be held and should be feared when that's not the case, sure there are some VERY aggressive species out there but I am not going for those types. Again, I return to my original point. Some tarantula that grows quick: can get large, is docile and is also handleable. FYI I already know about the breathing thing.

Also, I wouldn't say they are "instinct-driven" so much. There have been a number of studies confirming that tarantula's do have basic cognitive abilities and in some cases the ability to learn/solve problems.
Thank you for your input, nonetheless :)

@EulersK I am currently researching and looking at all of those species you mentioned. :)
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
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Aug 8, 2016
Messages
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@Moonohol then why do people particularly choose docile species to handle, then breeders sell them off and market them as "Handleable" species? You're being a bit narrow minded. As I said I have handled a Goliath bird eater before, it was not mine and it was well tempered. I do fully realize the risk of a bite and the hairs or more over barbs being flung at you. I do enjoy watching any spiders species, (if its big enough to see with the naked eye) eat, feed, breed or general activities. "EulersK" is right in what he says, if I want to handle it, its my choice at the end of the day.

You're making it out as if a tarantula's can never be held and should be feared when that's not the case, sure there are some VERY aggressive species out there but I am not going for those types. Again, I return to my original point. Some tarantula that grows quick: can get large, is docile and is also handleable. FYI I already know about the breathing thing.

Also, I wouldn't say they are "instinct-driven" so much. There have been a number of studies confirming that tarantula's do have basic cognitive abilities and in some cases the ability to learn/solve problems.
Thank you for your input, nonetheless :)

@EulersK I am currently researching and looking at all of those species you mentioned. :)
You can do whatever you want to, but I think anyone who is considering getting in to tarantula husbandry should understand the risks they're exposing themselves AND their spiders to when they handle them. Tarantulas should not be feared, they should be respected. Urticating bristles aren't going to kill you, nor is a bite. On the flip side, a tarantula hopping off of your hand on to the floor almost certainly WILL kill it. I refuse to handle my Ts not because I'm afraid of getting poked or bristled. I refuse to handle them because I value their lives too much to risk them unnecessarily.

I just wanted to make sure you understand the risks. It is ultimately up to you to make the decision of whether or not to handle.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,691
big, quick growing yet
This information is subjective and thus meaningless. We are not mind readers. Help us, help you, please quantify.

There have been a number of studies confirming that tarantula's do have basic cognitive abilities and in some cases the ability to learn/solve problems.
Please provide the peer-reviewed citations for these studies, especially the problem solving. This would be interesting to read.
 

EulersK

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Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Also, I wouldn't say they are "instinct-driven" so much. There have been a number of studies confirming that tarantula's do have basic cognitive abilities and in some cases the ability to learn/solve problems.
Thank you for your input, nonetheless :)
Do you have citations for this? I'd love to read any publications you have.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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A. chalchodes is I believe Eulers' favorite behining T.
A. chalcodes is definitely my favorite beginner, but it misses the mark for the OP. Slow growing and (subjectively) boring coloration. Personally, I love their colors, but I think the OP is after more than just a manila coloration.
 

Nephrite

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Messages
148
The two species I have researched and looked at are:

aphonopelma chalcodes
and
brachypelma smithi

The problem is, both of them are slow growing and I want something bigger but has the same docile nature to it. So, I would like a tarantula that is big, quick growing yet docile so it is handleable. Can you guys recommend any?

P.S. I have handled a Goliath bird eater before and I currently own two Giant house spiders, if that is of any interest. Yes I realize tarantula's are different, and need their own seperate blah blah as I said I have researched both of the species I listed.
Medium growing, fantastic eater, easy to care quite docile. Though skittish and fast, so I don't know about handling
 

EulersK

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@TheShrubbery
Something to consider. The docile species tend to be boring. The likes of B. vagans, C. cyaneopubescens, and A. seemanni aren't able to he handled due to their skittish nature, but they're very interesting. Always up to something.

So, you kind of have to choose. Do you want a pet rock that you can handle, or an active spider that you can't?
 

YagerManJennsen

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
508
@Moonohol then why do people particularly choose docile species to handle, then breeders sell them off and market them as "Handleable" species? You're being a bit narrow minded. As I said I have handled a Goliath bird eater before, it was not mine and it was well tempered. I do fully realize the risk of a bite and the hairs or more over barbs being flung at you. I do enjoy watching any spiders species, (if its big enough to see with the naked eye) eat, feed, breed or general activities. "EulersK" is right in what he says, if I want to handle it, its my choice at the end of the day.

You're making it out as if a tarantula's can never be held and should be feared when that's not the case, sure there are some VERY aggressive species out there but I am not going for those types. Again, I return to my original point. Some tarantula that grows quick: can get large, is docile and is also handleable. FYI I already know about the breathing thing.

Also, I wouldn't say they are "instinct-driven" so much. There have been a number of studies confirming that tarantula's do have basic cognitive abilities and in some cases the ability to learn/solve problems.
Thank you for your input, nonetheless :)

@EulersK I am currently researching and looking at all of those species you mentioned. :)
If I have a pet, of any kind no matter what it is. I at least want to look at it in full detail on my hand rather than in its enclosure. That goes for all pets really, it doesn't necessarily mean I am going to do it 24/7.
I don't exactly want a pet that I can never touch, where's the fun in that? I'm a practical person, I like to get stuck in there hands on. [Insert joke of finger being lopped off by tarantula ehheheheheehehehe]

That's why I specified "handleable" species. @Alana and @shining
@TheShrubbery
Something to consider. The docile species tend to be boring. The likes of B. vagans, C. cyaneopubescens, and A. seemanni aren't able to he handled due to their skittish nature, but they're very interesting. Always up to something.

So, you kind of have to choose. Do you want a pet rock that you can handle, or an active spider that you can't?
Lasiodora parahybana is more towards the beginner range of spiders, is it not? maybe thats an option?
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
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Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
Lasiodora parahybana is more towards the beginner range of spiders, is it not? maybe thats an option?
LPs are a bit faster/skittish and more likely to kick hairs and bite than the others mentioned. LPs are great beginners mostly because of their hardiness, ease of keeping and they are almost always out and about
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Messages
3,290
Lasiodora parahybana is more towards the beginner range of spiders, is it not? maybe thats an option?
It's definitely a beginner, but not one to handle at all. My subadult female is anything but docile, but even if she was, I'd never touch her. Their urticating setae are pretty nasty, and they readily kick that hair.
 
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