First T

MikeDell

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
38
I was considering purchasing my first tarantula soon from a reputable online vendor. Can someone suggest the best option as well as one who sells fully grown adults? I don't want to raise one from a baby until I have gotten some experience.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Depends on what you mean by "best option". What do you want in a T? Pretty colors? Really big? Skittish? Defensive?

Take a look at this video and see if one catches your eye:

Also, ignore any care sheet you may have read up until this point. They're almost all garbage. After you choose a species, let us know and we can tell you how to set it up.
 

MikeDell

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
38
Depends on what you mean by "best option". What do you want in a T? Pretty colors? Really big? Skittish? Defensive?

Take a look at this video and see if one catches your eye:

Also, ignore any care sheet you may have read up until this point. They're almost all garbage. After you choose a species, let us know and we can tell you how to set it up.
Thanks. When I say best option, I mean vendor. As for the specific spider, I was thinking Oklahoma Brown or Chilean Rose Hair. I know females can live decades and I am not sure I should jump into a commitment like that. Would a male be better for me or do they only last a year or two?
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
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Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Unfortunately, we're not able to discuss specific breeders/dealers here. Against the TOS, you understand. I'd suggest reading the review subforum for more of that info.

Sorry, common names are kind of garbage :D You'll find none of us use them due to the vague nature of them. I'm not familiar with Oklahoma Brown, but the Rose Hair is G. rosea. I hate them as beginner spiders, as I said in the video. They're boring colors, they're pet rocks, and they grow like a tree. Males tend to be pretty expensive due to their value to breeders, so I'd stay away from those.

Almost all tarantulas available to you have very long lifespans. If you're not interested in caring for it for many years to come, I'd look at another pet honestly.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Messages
11,508
@MikeDell

Check your PM Inbox.

Only a MATURE male will die sooner and not later, could be 1-3 years as an average depends on species/individual T as well.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
Chromatopelma seem a pretty good option. They don't last as long as the Grammostolas and are super pretty. No humidity requirements either, just a hide, dry sub, and a water dish. I know of a few dealers, so I would just look up "tarantula unboxing" on Youtube. You'll find a lot of good results there. :D
 

Garth Vader

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2016
Messages
436
I think by Oklahoma brown you mean Aponophelma Henzi, right? I'm rather new to Ts and have a sling/juvenile Aponophelma Anax, same genus and from what I understand can be similar in temperament and appearance to Henzi. Honestly, mine might actually be a Henzi since I bought him from Petco (barf, I know) and they aren't exactly the best as identifying species from what I gather. Anyway, these Ts are inexpensive, easy to care for, and tend to be docile. They grow slowly and do not have bright, flashy colors so that makes them perhaps not as exciting as other species to T owners. I have to say that mine is a peach. He makes cool burrows, eats regularly, and when I recently rehoused him he moved slowly and methodically, no probs at all. I think that could be a good beginner species.

I thought the 15-20 yr commitment to owning a female seemed crazy at first. Honestly, once you get a proper set up these critters don't need much. It's not like a dog or a cat. You feed them occasionally, make sure they have water, and then leave them alone. My biggest challenge has been that- actually leaving my T alone! I recently purchased a new T (Eauthlus sp red, another great one for beginners) and wanted a female for the extra years! It seems sad for males- they mature and then roam around their cage for a bit hoping to find a mate and then die not too long afterwards.

You are in the right place. Read up on this board and you will learn a lot. Also, I recommend reading The Tarantula Keeper's Guide. Apparently it needs updating and had minimal info on OW tarantulas, but has been helpful to me in understanding the basics as a total beginner to this hobby.
 

MikeDell

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
38
I think by Oklahoma brown you mean Aponophelma Henzi, right? I'm rather new to Ts and have a sling/juvenile Aponophelma Anax, same genus and from what I understand can be similar in temperament and appearance to Henzi. Honestly, mine might actually be a Henzi since I bought him from Petco (barf, I know) and they aren't exactly the best as identifying species from what I gather. Anyway, these Ts are inexpensive, easy to care for, and tend to be docile. They grow slowly and do not have bright, flashy colors so that makes them perhaps not as exciting as other species to T owners. I have to say that mine is a peach. He makes cool burrows, eats regularly, and when I recently rehoused him he moved slowly and methodically, no probs at all. I think that could be a good beginner species.

I thought the 15-20 yr commitment to owning a female seemed crazy at first. Honestly, once you get a proper set up these critters don't need much. It's not like a dog or a cat. You feed them occasionally, make sure they have water, and then leave them alone. My biggest challenge has been that- actually leaving my T alone! I recently purchased a new T (Eauthlus sp red, another great one for beginners) and wanted a female for the extra years! It seems sad for males- they mature and then roam around their cage for a bit hoping to find a mate and then die not too long afterwards.

You are in the right place. Read up on this board and you will learn a lot. Also, I recommend reading The Tarantula Keeper's Guide. Apparently it needs updating and had minimal info on OW tarantulas, but has been helpful to me in understanding the basics as a total beginner to this hobby.
Thanks for the reply. I plan on studying awhile more before I buy. Another one that caught my eye was the G pulchripes. I have some scorpion experience but tarantulas fascinate me too.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
Aphonopelma hentzi is the "Oklahoma brown" you spoke of, good spider, I recently aquired one. But you can expect a threat display when you bug him if he's like mine.

Grammostola pulchripes is an amazing species of T for beginner and expert alike. Very hardy, not a bad temperament, and they get huge and are beautiful :) I will say it's actually a lot of fun raising these guys from young. I have one that I call digger because he apparently thinks he's a bulldozer.

As far as dealers go, I can't recommend any as I've only purchased spiders from these boards, but I can recommend checking out the classifieds. If it turns out you like the pulchripes, @cold blood has some great started young ones nearing 1.5-2" at a killer price.
I myself and others on the boards have ordered their siblings

Welcome to the hobby :)
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Thanks for the reply. I plan on studying awhile more before I buy. Another one that caught my eye was the G pulchripes. I have some scorpion experience but tarantulas fascinate me too.
What G. pulchripes excels at may not be what you're looking for. What exactly do you want in a spider? If you want activity, then an A. seemanni would be great. If you want colors, then a C. cyaneopubescens. If you want a huge spider, then yeah, go G. pulchripes. Take a look at some Brachypelma species, those have some of the best coloration in my opinion. Too bad they're mostly pet rocks.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
This is my G. pulchripes (female? Not sure and can't tell in this species). I've had her for about 8 years. It has been a dream, and they really are little bulldozers. She constantly moves dirt from one side to another! Also, if you want color you could always go for an OBT... Just sayin... lol. Please don't do that ;)
 

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Mauri

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
227
Never had a threat display from my Hentzi. She's so chilled out it's untrue. However with some of these easier T's you must be aware they can be fussy eaters...but then it's pretty easy to remove any prey after a few hrs. (Enola currently has a black cricket that she is refusing).

Anax slings can burrow so beware of that. Not sure about when mature but am guessing they can as in the wild I think both Hentzi and Anax like to burrow (well makes sense to avoid predators).

I'd actually suggest getting a sling. A GBB (green bottle blue) or a T Lagunas or as peeps say a G.Pulchipres. My reason being although a GBB is quick (but it's not overly prone to mad bursts of speed) they settle in quick and are great feeders n easy to keep.

I'd also recommend a juve female GBB. T lagunas again great eaters and easy to raise. Those have been my easiest to raise so far.

Oh and another I think is a good juve female to have is a Acanthoscurria Geniculata (better eaters I think than say a Henzti or a Brachy).

For me raising slings was the way to go but then I also got myself a juve female Hentzi and a P.Irminia a month into the hobby (the biggest UK show) so I'd get an understanding of an "easier" adult and well a bit of a reclusive beauty. (I also think Psalmopoeus are pretty easy to raise, it's just the initial speed and possible escape that the real issue. My 2 P.cambridgei slings settled in and after one day they make a substrate hide so all u need to is plop in a cricket next to them and they are pretty reclusive..i.e they wont come out of their enclosure generally).

Any shows near you is also a great way to start.

p.s and OBT's arent that bad. Just quick. Well as slings anyway...def not adult.
 
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gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Just stay away from any "rose hairs". My GF's is an active webber and fussy with food. Mine... gives me a headache. I have to keep her on the humid side, actively burrows and tunnels and will molt unexpectedly. I got her from my older sister and she was adult. She has molted 5 times in my care since I had her in 2016. Any growth is unnoticeable. An easy and hardy T but... complicated.

Rose hairs are the equivalent of the dumb friend in a group.... you don't know what they are doing, you don't want to ask what they are doing, and you are not quite sure why you call them a friend.

G.pulchripes are nice T's. Some can be grouches. Some will have attitude changes after a molt.

I suggest 2 spiders for you. B.cabloca, grow fast and gentle spiders. Have burrowing tendencies as a sling and are very unique spiders.

My second suggestion is B.Vagans. I wouldn't call them defensive or moody. They just simply treat everything as food. I have actually seen these T's attack their water like it is prey. They grow fast for a bracheypelma, beautiful, cheap, and display T's even when young. This is the only T I would ever recommend to someone as a first time sling. They prefer more humidity than other brachys but letting the cage dry out is perfectly acceptable just keep the water dish full.
 

Mauri

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
227
Actually yeah B.Vagans is a good suggestion. Although dont they get hair flicky? (more than say a T.Lagunas or a GBB). I really do have a soft spot for the T.Lagunas but then maybe have been lucky with mine because it's temperament seems so good. Plus they end up stunning.

(oh it does burrow when moulting). I have seen those B.Caboclas..again another good suggestion
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
Just stay away from any "rose hairs". My GF's is an active webber and fussy with food. Mine... gives me a headache. I have to keep her on the humid side, actively burrows and tunnels and will molt unexpectedly. I got her from my older sister and she was adult. She has molted 5 times in my care since I had her in 2016. Any growth is unnoticeable. An easy and hardy T but... complicated.

Rose hairs are the equivalent of the dumb friend in a group.... you don't know what they are doing, you don't want to ask what they are doing, and i you are not quite sure why you call them a friend.

G.pulchripes are nice T's. Some can be grouches. Some will have attitude changes after a molt.

I suggest 2 spiders for you. B.cabloca, grow fast and gentle spiders. Have burrowing tendencies as a sling and are very unique spiders.

My second suggestion is B.Vagans. I wouldn't call them defensive or moody. They just simply treat everything as food. I have actually seen these T's attack their water like it is prey. They grow fast for a bracheypelma, beautiful, cheap, and display T's even when young. This is the only T I would ever recommend to someone as a first time sling. They prefer more humidity than other brachys but letting the cage dry out is perfectly acceptable just keep the water dish full.
WHAT!? Your adult rosehair molted 5 times in your care in 2016!? That is insane, you sure you have a rosehair? ;)
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
The hobby is almost entirely CBB, just look at pricelists. Almost all countries are shut down for exporting wildlife, and that's the primary source of adults. If you want a CBB adult, you'll pay premium for it. And those you just stumble on when someone happens to sell one, they're rarely carried as stock items. The few species that are still coming in as wild caught adults/subadults: most aren't a good choice for a beginner.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
Actually yeah B.Vagans is a good suggestion. Although dont they get hair flicky? (more than say a T.Lagunas or a GBB). I really do have a soft spot for the T.Lagunas but then maybe have been lucky with mine because it's temperament seems so good. Plus they end up stunning.

(oh it does burrow when moulting). I have seen those B.Caboclas..again another good suggestion
I've heard they can be a bit fliky, mines pretty darn chill, but he's not mature yet. I don't believe they are known to be as bad as say a B. Emilia with flicking though
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
WHAT!? Your adult rosehair molted 5 times in your care in 2016!? That is insane, you sure you have a rosehair? ;)

I am using "rose hair" as a blanket term for g.rosea, porteri, and "northern gold". She is a porteri, my GF's is a "northern gold"

twice she molted due to failed breeding attempts. I use to have MM RCF I would breed with her. Turns out I was hybridizing.
 
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