First T, special requirements

Sijaka

Arachnopeon
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Sep 4, 2016
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Hello, first I'd like to state that I've read trough the beginner info thread, but it did not answer some of my questions.
Sorry for having to start a new beginners T thread.

As you probably understand I'm looking to get in to the hobby, but my work puts some limitations if not making it imposible for me to join in.
I'm looking for a T witch can endure that I'm at sea for aprox. 5 weeks at a time before staying home the same amount of time.
I'll make a waterdish that's filled using gravitation, so water should not be a problem.

I'm mostly looking in to the hobby because I want to ridd myself of aracnofobia, but also because I find these creatures verry fascinating. Whit this said a T that could be handeled would probably be the best way to go.

For colour it would be nice with bright ones or clear patterns, but not at the cost for the wellbeing of the T in regards to how long I'll be away or how good it'll be suited for handeling.

I'd appreciate if the T did not hide away too much, but rather stayed comfortable and visible in the enclosure.

Regarding budget, I'm thinking of a limit of 150USD as I'd like to find a sub adult/adult size, if this won't make things harder as a keeper.

I've got a 90 litre aquarium I'm thinking I'll convert into a terarium, if the size won't be a problem?

Hope to get some suggestions and feedback :)
Lastly I'd like to apologize for my english, as it's not my native language.
 

basin79

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I wouldn't get a pet that was left alone for 5 weeks but that's just me. I'd feel really bad if anything happened to it whilst I was away.

A Brachypelma sp would probably be best though as you don't have the humidity to worry about. They like it dry. They're also stunning. To me the B. Smithi is the quintessential tarantula.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with your English. I wish I was as proficient in a foreign language.
 

Poec54

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Tarantulas need water and will die without it. 5 weeks is too long to leave it alone.
 

darkness975

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Theoretically it could work if you are able to rig something up that ensures it has constant access to water. Probably more than one water dish too in case one gets knocked over.

5 weeks without food would not be a huge problem for a well fed Tarantula that is a sub adult or adult of certain species like the Grammostola sp. or Brachypelma sp. With that being said, I personally would be afraid to leave for so long at a time but that is me.

I think you could make something work, especially for a good cause as you are doing. The more of us Arachno addicts the better!! :)
 

sdsnybny

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Last edited:

EulersK

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First, a few species to look into. For your needs, only get an adult. A juvenile would work, but their full on hardiness doesn't really kick in until adulthood. These are all species that can withstand punishment in terms of humidity, water, and food deprevation:
-Brachypelma emilia
-Grammostola porteri or rosea(many color forms, not all are a dull brown)
-Grammostola pulchra
-Aphonopelma chalcodes (my favorite choice)
-Brachypelma albopilosum
-Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (still very hardy, but the most fragile on this list - also not handleable at all, but the most beautiful on this list)

Now, about food. I wouldn't even think twice about food deprivation for only five weeks. For my adults of the above species, all but the C. cyaneopubescens get one large meal every six weeks. And even on that feeding schedule, the meal is refused more often than not. Note that not all tarantulas are this way! But you asked for hardy, and that's the definition of hardy. So, really, don't worry about it again.

Concerning water, while I would not recommend it at all, I'm sure that at least B. emilia, G. porteri, and A. chalcodes would be just fine without water for five weeks. Again, not a good idea, but these are all arid species. The G. porteri/rosea in particular are native to one of the driest deserts in the world. I bring this up because I don't foresee that watering system working. Tarantulas of all species have a habit of destroying their water source: filling it with substrate, webbing over it, defecating in it, throwing garbage in it, etc. It's worth trying that system, but don't be surprised if you come home to a dish full of putrid water.

Now about handling. I won't recite it here, but please look into the dangers of handling. Spiders very easily die from a fall, that's the gist of it. Concerning the handler (you), all of the above species have urticating setae - "itchy hairs" that vary in severity. The likes of C. cyaneopubescens has benign setae as far as I'm concerned, but some Brachypelma species have some severe setae that goes beyond itching and feels more like a burn. The spider has to actively kick off hair for you to feel it, but the possibility is there.

Finally, about the aquarium. That's perfectly fine, just do not use a screen lid. Cut some acrylic to size, drill holes for ventilation (you can't have too many holes with any of those species), add a locking mechanism, and you're good. If you need more instructions on this process, feel free to ask. Also be sure to fill it with substrate. You want no more than 2x diagonal leg span from the substrate to the lid. Again, falls are bad.

Any more questions? Need clarification? Feel free to ask. Welcome to the hobby :) You'll want to buy some shelves.
 
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basin79

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First, a few species to look into. For your needs, only get an adult. A juvenile would work, but their full on hardiness doesn't really kick in until adulthood. These are all species that can withstand punishment in terms of humidity, water, and food deprevation:
-Brachypelma emilia
-Grammostola porteri or rosea(many color forms, not all are a dull brown)
-Grammostola pulchra
-Aphonopelma chalcodes (my favorite choice)
-Brachypelma albopilosum
-Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (still very hardy, but the most fragile on this list - also not handleable at all, but the most beautiful on this list)

Now, about food. I wouldn't even think twice about food deprivation for only five weeks. For my adults of the above species, all but the C. cyaneopubescens get one large meal every six weeks. And even on that feeding schedule, the meal is refused more often than not. Note that not all tarantulas are this way! But you asked for hardy, and that's the definition of hardy. So, really, don't worry about it again.

Concerning water, while I would not recommend it at all, I'm sure that at least B. emilia, G. porteri, and A. chalcodes would be just fine without water for five weeks. Again, not a good idea, but these are all arid species. The G. porteri/rosea in particular are native to one of the driest deserts in the world. I bring this up because I don't foresee that watering system working. Tarantulas of all species have a habit of destroying their water source: filling it with substrate, webbing over it, defecating in it, throwing garbage in it, etc. It's worth trying that system, but don't be surprised if you come home to a dish full of putrid water.

Now about handling. I won't recite it here, but please look into the dangers of handling. Spiders very easily die from a fall, that's the gist of it. Concerning the handler (you), all of the above species have urticating setae - "itchy hairs" that vary in severity. The likes of C. cyaneopubescens has benign setae as far as I'm concerned, but some Brachypelma species have some severe setae that goes beyond itching and feels more like a burn. The spider has to actively kick off hair for you to feel it, but the possibility is there.

Finally, about the aquarium. That's perfectly fine, just do not use a screen lid. Cut some acrylic to size, drill holes for ventilation (you can have too many holes with any of those species), add a locking mechanism, and you're good. If you need more instructions on this process, feel free to ask. Also be sure to fill it with substrate. You want no more than 2x diagonal leg span from the substrate to the lid. Again, falls are bad.

Any more questions? Need clarification? Feel free to ask. Welcome to the hobby :) You'll want to buy some shelves.
Great post.
 

KezyGLA

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If any. I would suggest G. rosea/porteri. I am only saying this as mine survived while i was absent for 6 months. I did not plan it and this was years before I knew what I do now. At the end of the day I really think you should not bother. Not trying to be nasty in any way as I know you may want a pet but there are work commitments that make this near impossible.

I appreciate that you have asked here but you really need to understand wether what you are doing is cruel or not.

IMO I would not get a pet if care can not be guaranteed for long periods of time. Sorry
 

KezyGLA

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As far as the more arid species are recommended. Please note there may be problems that require your help even when you wont be there.
 

bryverine

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Apr 18, 2012
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894
One of these will work fine for ample water during your time away They are about 8" tall. i think that a shorter bottle could also be found to fit the bowl.
Cant see a T drinking more than that, plus the evaporation will help with overall humidity in the enclosure.
http://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/flukers-repta-waterer-with-cricket-guard-filter-screen#

This one looks just like a rock outcrop
https://www.amazon.com/Exo-Terra-Water-Well-Reptiles/dp/B009ERMS78
I would highly recommend if @Sijaka or anyone else is going to try this, give it the five weeks in the same setup (temps and ambient humidity) to see if it still has water in 5 weeks.

Here in New Mexico, I have a feeling that puppy would be empty by then though.

I've considered a peristalic dosing head with a 5 gallon jug for long away trips, but my collection at a measly 14 would be a huge pain to setup even with cheap pumps.

With only 1 T, this might be something to consider for the OP.
 

Sijaka

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Messages
9
Thank you for all you'r replys :)

As I said in the original post, maby not that clearly. I'm worried about the wellbeing of the spider, if not I think I'd hust bougth a gramostola and think; hey, lets see if this works out or not.
The big reason I posted this thread was to find out if there is a spidey that would be be fine with the conditions I can provide.

I were thought to make a waterbowl like the one Sdsnybny linked to (did not lnow they could be bougth finished) and secure it through the lid so it won't be able to fall over.

Modding the aquarium to suit a spider is not that hard either, I was thinking to use aluminium for the new top plate as I can easily get my hands on perforated and solid sheets, workimg as a ships engineer a little handywork of my own is nothing new.

As for humidity, if I make the amount of substrate bigger then whats normal. It should contain more water without being to wet. The aquarium I have handy for this project is 50cm (20inches) tall, so a good 20-30cm (8-12inches) is posible.

As for my location, I live in northern Norway (69°n) so we are not bothered with long warm summers, this year I think we had 10 days with.20°C and none with 30°C. If this might help solve this equation.

I'll read up on the suggested species today, once again thank you for your replys.

Emil
 

Poec54

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As for my location, I live in northern Norway (69°n) so we are not bothered with long warm summers, this year I think we had 10 days with.20°C and none with 30°C. If this might help solve this equation.

You also run artificial heat most of the year, which significantly dries the air out. With your situation, the problem isn't high outdoor temps, it's low temps.
 

Sijaka

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Sep 4, 2016
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T
You also run artificial heat most of the year, which significantly dries the air out. With your situation, the problem isn't high outdoor temps, it's low temps.
That might be true, never tougth of it that way.
I dont know if the type of heating does have anything to say?
I use heating cables in the flor.

I'll do a conversion on the fishtank when I get home in about two weeks and make a test run to see how much it'll dry up and how much water that the gravity fed waterbowl will need.
Any good tips to check out the level of moist in the substrate other than just putting my fingers in it? I'd like a little more acurate way of telling the conditions of the moist.
Maby a multimeter set to mesure recistance, stuff the probes 5cm (2inches) down, leave them there and do a weekly or dayli checks to accuratly measure the changes?

A nother thing I forgot to mention earlyer, my father goes by my flat 2 times a week to water my flowers and take my mail. He'll be able to keep an eye on the T for me, but I higly doubt that he'll ever stick his hands in the enclosure.
Placing a pvc pipe in the substrate, up through the lid will make it possible for him to add a little water once a week.
 

TownesVanZandt

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May 12, 2015
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T


That might be true, never tougth of it that way.
I dont know if the type of heating does have anything to say?
I use heating cables in the flor.

I'll do a conversion on the fishtank when I get home in about two weeks and make a test run to see how much it'll dry up and how much water that the gravity fed waterbowl will need.
Any good tips to check out the level of moist in the substrate other than just putting my fingers in it? I'd like a little more acurate way of telling the conditions of the moist.
Maby a multimeter set to mesure recistance, stuff the probes 5cm (2inches) down, leave them there and do a weekly or dayli checks to accuratly measure the changes?

A nother thing I forgot to mention earlyer, my father goes by my flat 2 times a week to water my flowers and take my mail. He'll be able to keep an eye on the T for me, but I higly doubt that he'll ever stick his hands in the enclosure.
Placing a pvc pipe in the substrate, up through the lid will make it possible for him to add a little water once a week.

An arid species can be placed in a Kritter Keeper (in Norway, they sell Exo Terra Faunariums in almost every pet shop). You can simply add water from the top without having to open the enclosure. So, if your father can water your plants, he can water fill the water dish as well, I suppose :)

As for "checking the substrate", it´s no need for that. For tropical species I just keep it moist, for arid species I keep it completely dry.
 

KezyGLA

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You also run artificial heat most of the year, which significantly dries the air out. With your situation, the problem isn't high outdoor temps, it's low temps.
Here, Poec has a point. I keep an oscillating fan on around my exotics. My main abode is not far from you if you are Norway native. I try to keep above 22C and keep the airflow going.
 
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Sijaka

Arachnopeon
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Sep 4, 2016
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9
I'm a norwegian native yes, I live in Tromsø if you ever heard of it?
Where are you from/live since you think it's close? :)

I keep 24° all year through the heating cables, to add a fan would be overkill in my opinion
 

KezyGLA

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I'm a norwegian native yes, I live in Tromsø if you ever heard of it?
Where are you from/live since you think it's close? :)

I keep 24° all year through the heating cables, to add a fan would be overkill in my opinion
Ahh, I see. I think Tromsø is far north? I was going to say we probably have similar climates as I live in Scotland but if you are all the way up there then probably not heheh
 

Sijaka

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Ahh, I see. I think Tromsø is far north? I was going to say we probably have similar climates as I live in Scotland but if you are all the way up there then probably not heheh
Yeah, it's quite a bit up in the north (at 69°n), but i dont think that the climate is to different since both Norway and Scotland have lots of coastlines, thus the weather and conditions are dictated by the sea.
 

TownesVanZandt

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Yeah, it's quite a bit up in the north (at 69°n), but i dont think that the climate is to different since both Norway and Scotland have lots of coastlines, thus the weather and conditions are dictated by the sea.
Ah, Tromsø, the "Paris of the North" :D. We live in the same country, but in distance you´re almost as far away from Oslo as @Chris LXXIX in Lombardia, Italia.
 
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