First pede suggestions

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
Ok, so forgive my total ignorance on centipedes, I recently entered the world of tarantulas and fell in love, well I have to say I've seen some picture such as Scolopendra polymorpha and I'm rather interested in getting something.

So, what would you experts recommend, here's the criteria..

Something that's not going to kill my dog or reptiles if it does happen to get out. Is there a centipede that has a lower potency venom?) I have no intention of ever touching, proding, or handling the pede in any way, but something that didn't bolt every time the top was lifted would be nice.

A bit of size would be nice. Maybe 6-10"? I could go a bit bigger don't know sizes on these guys at all

I'm sure most species of pede hide, so I won't bother saying a nice display species lol. But it would be nice to see it.

Is there a crash course for these guys as far as husbandry, feeding, enclosures, species listing? Or is it best to just read here, like it is for tarantula?

Thanks a ton in advance! :)
 
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Munax

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 5, 2015
Messages
54
Some polymorpha get 6+ inches, and their venom is mild compared to other species.
heros are also a good choice, 6-8in but are more expensive and harder to find.
dehaani get big (7-9in) and are cheap, but are extremely venomous and could harm you or your pets should it escape.

A lot of the bigger centipedes are a lot more expensive (like $300-400+) and are also hard to come by, but if you're willing to spend that much money there are species like gigantea that get to around 9-10in
 
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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,693
Well, about the centipedes venom potency issue, my man, as far as I know the problem is (unlike for Theraphosidae where "you" have a lot of choice within the league of somewhat harmless/weak venom T's, as you know) that in general centipedes venom is not only different (there's rumors that allergic reactions could happens, while with T's venom I've never heard on a solid, valid level that) but a bit more severe.

Think that a good starter centipede, here in Italy, is Scolopendra cingulata, and that's normal: a native specie, you can WC those in Lazio region without issues of all sorts (save for ethic ones), easy to care for. Still the venom, while not severe (now, never been bitten, eh... those are the speculations generally accepted) is however more painful than the average 'Grammo/Brachy' T's. However, viewed as a good starter centipede, here.

The only issue is that from what I know, S.cingulata are a bit rare in the U.S but could be wrong now.

Overall, I think that no matter now which centipede, with those there's one rule to follow: a no escape at all enclosure and inches of moist substrate. Cork bark. The proper ventilation. A water dish of course. Leaves/fake leaves (I use fake). Done.

Seriously they are the ultimate escape masters, trust me man. T's? Well, when I read here that T's are escape masters I laugh, for that those keepers never had, probably, to deal with one of those crawling buggers.

I have a S.subspinipes, recently purchased two months ago, is a pet hole mostly, always under the cork bark where he/she burrowed. But at late night/dawn is out for hunting, and trust me, with the head keeps tryng to open the enclosure top. She use the holes I drilled for climb, ah ah. Granted, fail hard, but they are stubborn as hell :)

Only a B.dubia calm him/her down, and in that sense, I've never saw before, in all of those decades of T's and few scorpions, such an aggressive hunting predatory behavior before. I swear. Name an OW Theraphosidae, from 'Haplos' to genus Chilobrachys, 'Baboons'. No one was/is so brutal IMO.

Side note about the prices: here in Italy centipedes in general are very, very cheap, save for S.gigantea of course. I don't know about U.S prices.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
Well, about the centipedes venom potency issue, my man, as far as I know the problem is (unlike for Theraphosidae where "you" have a lot of choice within the league of somewhat harmless/weak venom T's, as you know) that in general centipedes venom is not only different (there's rumors that allergic reactions could happens, while with T's venom I've never heard on a solid, valid level that) but a bit more severe.

Think that a good starter centipede, here in Italy, is Scolopendra cingulata, and that's normal: a native specie, you can WC those in Lazio region without issues of all sorts (save for ethic ones), easy to care for. Still the venom, while not severe (now, never been bitten, eh... those are the speculations generally accepted) is however more painful than the average 'Grammo/Brachy' T's. However, viewed as a good starter centipede, here.

The only issue is that from what I know, S.cingulata are a bit rare in the U.S but could be wrong now.

Overall, I think that no matter now which centipede, with those there's one rule to follow: a no escape at all enclosure and inches of moist substrate. Cork bark. The proper ventilation. A water dish of course. Leaves/fake leaves (I use fake). Done.

Seriously they are the ultimate escape masters, trust me man. T's? Well, when I read here that T's are escape masters I laugh, for that those keepers never had, probably, to deal with one of those crawling buggers.

I have a S.subspinipes, recently purchased two months ago, is a pet hole mostly, always under the cork bark where he/she burrowed. But at late night/dawn is out for hunting, and trust me, with the head keeps tryng to open the enclosure top. She use the holes I drilled for climb, ah ah. Granted, fail hard, but they are stubborn as hell :)

Only a B.dubia calm him/her down, and in that sense, I've never saw before, in all of those decades of T's and few scorpions, such an aggressive hunting predatory behavior before. I swear. Name an OW Theraphosidae, from 'Haplos' to genus Chilobrachys, 'Baboons'. No one was/is so brutal IMO.

Side note about the prices: here in Italy centipedes in general are very, very cheap, save for S.gigantea of course. I don't know about U.S prices.
Great info! What type of enclosure do you recommend? Sterlite plastic? Or glass aquarium? I'm guessing since they need humidity that replacing the screen top on a glass tank with acrylic would be a must.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,693
Great info! What type of enclosure do you recommend? Sterlite plastic? Or glass aquarium? I'm guessing since they need humidity that replacing the screen top on a glass tank with acrylic would be a must.
The problem now is (muahahahahah) that aside from the care part, I don't know if, on that sense, I am entitled to give you such advice because I was concerned first about the enclosure I'm actually using :p

I use a KIS brand plastic enclosure, a large one. First thing first to say, according to the general rule, the height of mines is inadequate (height, when centipedes are involved is only concerned for prevent climbing and escapes, not for their needs of course) but so far nothing happened :angelic:

I would suggest glass one with the right ventilation of course, with a top opening. But plastic is good if the no escape rule is respected.
 

KingBaboon352

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 21, 2016
Messages
16
Polymorpha is a good beginner pede , very easy to find aside from subspinipes . Also very decently priced .
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,693
Here my set up; nothing more than inches of moist Irish peat moss, cork bark (the 'pede is under the right one) water dish... the care is easy :)

only problem is an eye to their escape, sneaking ability but that's all :eek: <-- Eek!


thumbnail_DSC_0649.jpg
 

shining

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 15, 2011
Messages
755
I am no pede expert by any means but I can say for sure that they are extremely fast and they are the octopuses of the arthropod world, Houdinis with tergites. Also, stay away from Scolopendra subspinipes and Scolopendra dehaani. I believe those are the only medically significant pedes.

The safest way to keep them is having them in something way taller than their entire body and extended legs. It needs a secure locking lid that sits flush on the enclosure.

I have a 20 tall viv for my full grown S. dehaani and for my S. dehaani pedeling I have plastic jar thing with a screw on lid. On the 20 tall it's a screen lid with a piece of plexiglass that restricts 80% of the screen's airflow or less depending on how I position it. The pedeling jar just has a bunch of tiny well placed solder wand and thumb tack vent holes.

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Scoly

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 4, 2013
Messages
421
I recommend a smaller centipede as a starter, till you decide you like them and get used to their behaviour. So something like a Cingulata, which might grow to 6" or an everglades centipede.

Though it doesn't sound like much is a big difference between a 6" centipede and an 8-9" one. My first pede was a Dehaani, and I had some pretty hairy moments with it, along with the constant fear of it escaping.
 
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