Hello there, why not take a few seconds to register on our forums and become part of the community? Just click here.

Finally!

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Nightstalker47, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    Advertisement
    Waited over three years for this one to molt, was super fat and did next to nothing during that time. Looks to have put on quite a bit of size as well.

    Before the molt.
    [​IMG]

    And after. Bought as a flat rock scorpion, I am fairly sure its an H.paucidens.
    20190304_150905.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 5
  2. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

    CA
    Awesome! Glad it went well!
     
  3. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    Thanks, I suspected she may of been gravid at first. Guess not, still glad to see its growing and doing well, these scorpions do very little other then hide IME. Almost never ate in front of me either.
     
  4. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

    CA
    My plumped Hadrurus arizonensis is doing the same thing. *sigh*
     
  5. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoangel Active Member

    Yes, it does look like an H. pacidens. But I would wait for it to be fully hardened up and darkened first to tell 100%, since they are light on color for any freshly molted scorp. How big is she now? H. paucidens girls can breed around 4''-4.5'' (body length). Breeding these guys is not as boring nor as complicated as its cousin H. troglodytes. But the Hadogenes genus is an amazing genus overall. I'm not surprised it took 3 years for a molt, just breed this genus and you'll what half that time in my experience with breeding H. troglodytes (forever), LOL. :)
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  6. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    I will definitely give it a try if I can find a male. Shes fairly large now, I would estimate her body length to be somewhere around 4-5".
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  7. Dry Desert

    Dry Desert Arachnobaron Active Member

    UK
    Definitely H.paucidens not a " troggy ".
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  8. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoangel Active Member

    definitely good for breeding, but be warned: "The Hadogenes Genus are slow reproducers on offspring"

    Story Time
    Me and my friend bred its cousin the H. troglodytes, which it took ages. We bred a large H. troglodytes female, and fed her well. But then came the most worst part of all, "TIME". After waiting 6 months, she got fat and we thought she was gonna lay off offspring, but then after 12 months/1 year. We gave up completely, we just thought she was going to molt :rolleyes:. But then 1.5 years later (16 months), "BAM" she laid offspring at last. And I gotta say, "it was the first time I almost cried over an invert. EVER". :angelic:
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  9. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    Thanks.
    All good things take time. Sometimes when success comes too easy its hard to truly appreciate it. Ill start looking for a male now, since she just molted...should be the perfect time to get them paired up.
     
  10. Alex99

    Alex99 Arachnosquire

    I heard this genus can live for 10s of years, is that accurate or an over exaggeration?
     
  11. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    With how long they take to grow, that wouldn't surprise me one bit.
     
  12. Alex99

    Alex99 Arachnosquire

    Does anyone know if they actually live that long? I'd invest in one if that's the case..
     
  13. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnolord Active Member

    Ditto!
     
  14. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    I can say ten years easy, seeing as it took this one three for one molt. I would imagine she was over 7-8 years old at that point, as it takes a while for these to grow up from scorplings to adults.
     
  15. Dry Desert

    Dry Desert Arachnobaron Active Member

    UK
    10 + years to mature - 25/30 years life span.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  16. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    I have both captive born adult trogs and paucidens, trogs grow faster. I'd say 20%-30% faster. Are Hadogenes still easy to get these days? Since I have what I want, I rarely walk into pet stores anymore.
     
  17. beetleman

    beetleman Arachnoking Old Timer

    paucidens is not availible because of tanzania being closed for sometime around three years or so,but trogs are still availible, and way back then it was the other way around,this is why you don't see any red trapdoors,red claws,blue ring centies etc. this is in the US ofcourse. the other countries not sure.
     
  18. Dry Desert

    Dry Desert Arachnobaron Active Member

    UK
    You may well be right, I've not seen P.cavimanus or H.paucidens wild caught for quite a while now. P. paucidens appear quite regularly as captive bred though. This is in U.K.
     
  19. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking

    Yeah thats exactly right, I have not seen any here in Canada since I got mine a few years ago. A friend of mine told me the that blue ring centipedes are pretty much impossible to find now as well due to no new exports, im the only person with one in Montreal as far as I know. I didn't realize the scorpion came from Tanzania too, thanks for that bit of info...get the feeling finding a male paucidens wont be easy.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.