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Female or Male Theraphosa blondi?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Gretchen, Sep 1, 2012.

  1. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

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    Here are several ventral photos of my Theraphosa blondi. Can anyone identify the sex of this animal for me? Also noted, this T is only 7.5" DLS (diagonal leg span), so I'm assuming it is still a juvenile with some growing left to do.

    IMG_0895.jpg
    IMG_0897.jpg
    IMG_0903.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
  2. MarkmD

    MarkmD Arachnoprince

    Very good pics, I think your T,blondi is female, but I maybe wrong, someone will amswer better.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Hi MarkmD!

    I was thinking female also, but the Epigynal plate has that patch. It is noted that this patch is not circular or dark, so I'm thinking that it is a worn patch and that this <female?> is just in need of a good old fashion molt. However, I'm new to this hobby, and inexperienced at sexing - especially by just looking at the ventral.

    Also thanks for the response, and the compliment on the photos! :-D
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2012
  4. MrCrackerpants

    MrCrackerpants Arachnoprince

    tyi
    Not T. Blondi : )
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Hi MrCrackerpants! Oops! What is it? :-( I'm new to the hobby.
     
  6. Chris_Skeleton

    Chris_Skeleton Arachnoprince

    T. stirmi.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Hi Chris_Skeleton! Is this a female or a male T. stirmi?



    ---------- Post added 09-01-2012 at 08:24 PM ----------

    Hmmm... Would this be correct...

    If there is no hair on the patella, then it is T. stirmi. If the knee is covered in hair, it is the true T. blondi. Also, I would love a link to some good information on the T. stirmi, if anyone has it. Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2012
  8. CleanSweep

    CleanSweep Arachnopeon

    Up until a couple years ago, the T. stirmi used to be considered a Theraphosa sp. burgundy or Theraphosa blondi "burgundy". You are right about the hair on the patella being the main difference. Does yours have the hair?

    Afterthought: Wouldn't it suck to get those fangs sunk into your hand?
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2012
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  9. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    The hair is not on the patella. It starts on the tibia, and continues to the basitarsus and telotarsus. Yep, it is a T. stirmi, not a T. blondi like I originally thought. At the store, it was sold as a "Burgundy Goliath Birdeater", with no scientific name included on the carrier. :-( However, when I inquired further, the shop keep told me it was a T. blondi.

    And yes, I do believe that those fangs could do a world of hurt. I do respect the T, ALWAYS! Luckily, this is a mellow T, and the urticating hairs are more annoying than the "bite"...

    ---------- Post added 09-01-2012 at 08:52 PM ----------

    Hey CleanSweep, is this a female or male T. stirmi? Can you tell from the photographs?
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
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  10. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

    The hairs on the epigastric furrow area have been rubbed off, but you can see the top of the dark triangular patch that would indicate male. The lack of patella hair also indicate that's it is a T. stirmi. I suspect it will mature on its next molt...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Later, Tom
     
  11. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Thanks Tom! Do you need a mature T. stirmi male after his next molt? LOL!

    ---------- Post added 09-01-2012 at 09:32 PM ----------

    P.S. Nice added artwork for illustrative purposes! :-D
     
  12. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Another question...

    This T has a lot of worn down (rubbed off) 'hair' areas on both its abdomen and legs on the ventral side (see the photos above). I know it is in need of a molt, but would that type of wear tend to be more consistent with a WC versus a captive raised? Or are the T. stirmi just so heavy-bodied that this wear is just typical regardless of original habitat?

    On some of my larger terrestrial T's such as my L. parahybana, G. pulchra, H. gigas, and H. lividum, I have never noted so much wear; althought, frankly, I have not picked up my H. lividum to make a detailed inspection underneath like my other T's. :-O
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
  13. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

    Pet stores usually carry WC stock. Unless its a specialty shop like a reptile store or something , its highly unlikely they raised a Theraphosa from a sling to that size and are selling CB animals.
    Later, Tom
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Yes, the employees at this particular reptile store are not into their T's, although good snake and monitor experts from what I can gather. And no one in this particular store is breeding T's. They did indicate that they were getting their animals in through shipments.

    Thanks, Tom, for sharing your knowledge with me.
     
  15. Dr Who

    Dr Who Arachnopeon

    I'm getting itchy just looking at these pictures
     
    • Like Like x 2
  16. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    LOL! Yes, this T's biggest revenge for being held for his photo debut, was leaving plenty of 'hairs' on me. I did itch; however, this time around it was not as bad as it used to be. In the past when I would just walk past the container it seems I'd itch, but as of late it is less bothersome. I'm not sure why, but I'm glad... :-D
     
  17. VickyChaiTea

    VickyChaiTea Arachnosquire

    My first instinct was male as well.
     
  18. CleanSweep

    CleanSweep Arachnopeon

    The rubbing and bald spots come from being shipped in tight quaters after being wild caught. Mine looked like that too. After she molted she was like new. You can see examples from my pic gallery in my signature.
     
  19. Gretchen

    Gretchen Arachnopeon

    Thanks VickyChaiTea! I now believe it is a male, too. Thank you for your input! :-D

    I was confused on how to sex this animal, because it had rubbed off so many hairs on the epigynal plate, and I could not see the <epiandrous?> patch. As Philth had pointed out, there is still a shadow indicating such a patch (and therefore male), which I had not originally noticed. Plus, there is very little curve and not a great distance for the epyiginal furrow between the first set of book lungs (as compared to pictures of mature females that I've seen for that species), if that has any credence in sexing.

    Again, thanks!

    ---------- Post added 09-02-2012 at 07:50 PM ----------

    I just looked at your photos... Really excellent shots, and nice 'scapes, too! And your T. stirmi did molt out nice. :-D
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
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