Fell off females back?

DireWolf0384

Arachnoangel
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I found three scorplings from the female P.Imperator, off the females back and the rest are still on there. Did they fall off? They can barely walk and are still all white. I have for the time being put them each in separate deli containers. I will post pics tonight if I can get my camera out.
 

skinheaddave

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You can sometimes reintroduce them to the mother's back if you're fast enough. I'd suggest using forceps for the move so they don't pick up your scent.

In instances when mom won't take them or mom dies etc. there are ways of raising them. Lots of threads on here about that.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Jorpion

Arachnobaron
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If you can, gently pick them up with your fingers and place them near the mother. They'll be fine. If you're REALLY smooth and gentle you can place them on momma's back. Using forceps on newborn scorplings risks physical damage to their soft exoskeletons. I do not subscribe to the human scent theory (sorry Dave). It's scientifically not true for baby birds and my years of experience has led me to believe it to not be true for arachnids either. So gently pick em up and good luck!

Jeff
 

skinheaddave

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Using forceps on newborn scorplings risks physical damage to their soft exoskeletons. I do not subscribe to the human scent theory (sorry Dave).
No need to apologize. I will add, however:

a) Padded forceps. I've done it. No damage. You have to be delicate, of course, but it can be done. If you're that worried about damage, perhaps some latex gloves, washed of their powder, would do the trick?

b) Scorpions aren't birds. They have extremely adept chemosensory abilities. I suggest you (re)read "The Biology of Scorpions", Polis (1990) page 201:

The mother-offspring bond among scorpions appears to be maintained by chemoreception. Torres and Heatwole (1967a) found that the young of Centruroides nitidus and Tityus obtusus settle and remain only on conspecific females. If placed on females of other species, they do not remain there (on congenerics, they exhibit brief exploratory movements before leaving). When body fluids of a C. nitidus female were placed on the back of a female of a different species, the latter female became attractive to the young. Vannini et al. (1978), in a series of controlled experiments, found chemical stimuli to be important in maintaining the association in Euscorpius carpathicus including the mother's tolerance of the young. ...
The bit on maternal care etc. stretches on for a bit and covers a variety of related topics. Anyhow, this would seem to suggest that scent is important and that introducing human scent would be at least a risk, even if not certain rejection.

Cheers,
Dave
 

gromgrom

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No need to apologize. I will add, however:

a) Padded forceps. I've done it. No damage. You have to be delicate, of course, but it can be done. If you're that worried about damage, perhaps some latex gloves, washed of their powder, would do the trick?

b) Scorpions aren't birds. They have extremely adept chemosensory abilities. I suggest you (re)read "The Biology of Scorpions", Polis (1990) page 201:



The bit on maternal care etc. stretches on for a bit and covers a variety of related topics. Anyhow, this would seem to suggest that scent is important and that introducing human scent would be at least a risk, even if not certain rejection.

Cheers,
Dave
thats actually pretty interesting
 

DireWolf0384

Arachnoangel
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What if I just kept them in the deli cups where they are now? They appear to be doing well. Another stupid question: Do they benefit by staying on her back? I can't seem to get her to stay still.
 

skinheaddave

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Do they benefit by staying on her back?
They absorb their moisture from their mother for the first stage. She keeps them off the dirt. You have to ensure that they are kept clean and humid (but not necessarily wet) for that first stage. As I suggested earlier, do a search -- there are lots of threads on this very subject out there including what people have tried and what has worked or not.

Cheers,
Dave
 

DireWolf0384

Arachnoangel
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Apr 28, 2009
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They absorb their moisture from their mother for the first stage. She keeps them off the dirt. You have to ensure that they are kept clean and humid (but not necessarily wet) for that first stage. As I suggested earlier, do a search -- there are lots of threads on this very subject out there including what people have tried and what has worked or not.

Cheers,
Dave
I'll try to put them back on again though shes never stayed still long enough.
 
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