Feeding

Rachel C

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2017
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9
I have a B. smith juvie who's about an inch and a half/ two inches. I know she/hes ready to eat live food but I would love recommendations on what to feed. I know what she can and can't handle diet wise but my question is, What should I feed her to keep her safest? My biggest concern is her food turning her into food. I've tried to feed small dubias but she hasn't gone for them immediately and as soon as they get the change they burrows right into her substrate and I'm worried I won't be able to get it out without disturbing her entire living space. Would crickets be my best option? And before anyone says I should have done research, I have extensively. I'm just a paranoid new mom and want to keep her as safe as possible. Thank you for the advice in advance
 

ronoverdrive

Arachnopeon
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Jan 27, 2017
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11
Crush the dubias' heads before you throw them in so they don't play dead and burrow. Alternatively there's crickets (I personally hate them) and there's also Red Runner Roaches which are great for smaller spiders.
 

MrTwister

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Mar 17, 2017
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252
Throw a pre killed insect of your choosing at night. If it's there they next day remove and try again in day or two.
 

viper69

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Crickets are the easiest. Your tarantula is large enough to eat live prey. That is what they do in the wild, eat live generally. Roaches are excellent at remaining still, and often many Ts won't take to them readily or at all. I have a few that are not so fond of roaches.
 

sasker

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Oct 9, 2016
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What about maggots? You may find them repulsive, but my 1.5" B. smithi really loves them. So far, I have not discovered any downsides to using maggots for the smaller Ts. They are not aggressive, soft, small and the cheapest feeders available. Just go to your local fishing tackle shop. They do dig, but the worst case scenario is that you will end up with a fly in your house a while later. As they are so small, you might want to feed your B. smithi several maggots at the same time. This way you will get to see your tarantula trying to stuff as many maggots in its face as possible. I think its hilarious to watch her juggle with them. She puts one between her fangs, another one falls out, and this over and over again. Never gets old :)
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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You can feed whatever you want really. Just crush the heads of crickets/dubia/mealies/supers. :)
 

cold blood

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Jan 19, 2014
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anything a pet store sells for feeders will work.

Crickets, roaches (it will eat them) or worms are all fine choices....Mealworms and super worms are like roaches in that they burrow quickly so you need to crush heads...this doesnt kill them, just prevents burrowing.

Wax worms are another alternative...as are small worms like red worms.
 

cold blood

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Jan 19, 2014
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12,370
What about maggots? You may find them repulsive, but my 1.5" B. smithi really loves them. So far, I have not discovered any downsides to using maggots for the smaller Ts. They are not aggressive, soft, small and the cheapest feeders available. Just go to your local fishing tackle shop. They do dig, but the worst case scenario is that you will end up with a fly in your house a while later. As they are so small, you might want to feed your B. smithi several maggots at the same time. This way you will get to see your tarantula trying to stuff as many maggots in its face as possible. I think its hilarious to watch her juggle with them. She puts one between her fangs, another one falls out, and this over and over again. Never gets old :)
where are you getting captive bred fly larvae?
 

BrockiePelma

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Mar 20, 2017
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69
S.lateralis,this guys will roam the enclosure in speed if its placed in unharmed,im always amazed how the tarantula pounces on such a prey that moves so friggin' fast.

The disadvantage is(which can also be an advantage in some instances),is that when it gets tired,it stops moving,which could be a good sign that your T might not be hungry/interested and a good time to remove the prey.
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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where are you getting captive bred fly larvae?
My lps sells them for the fishing hobby. 50 euro cents for like 150 maggots. They wriggle a lot so the slings get a nice trigger. I used them for mantis nymphs as well.
 

johnny quango

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May 17, 2013
Messages
262
I tend to use waxworms over maggots as I tend to think maybe maggots lack some essential nutrition like their adult counterparts. Waxworm on the other hand are the larvae of moths and my slings and juveniles love them.

As for regular feeders you can't go wrong with crickets the only time I've had a tarantula refuse them is when they are in pre moult
 

sasker

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Oct 9, 2016
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1,094
where are you getting captive bred fly larvae?
I buy them from the local fishing tackle shop, which is 200 yards from my house. The maggots come from a maggot farm, so they are captive bred. I pay about USD 0.15 for about 30 grams/1 oz.
 

Rachel C

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2017
Messages
9
Thanks! I appreciate the help. I'm a super paranoid person when it comes to my animals and I've seem many horror stories of people leaving feeders in and their T's getting eaten. I'll probably try the crickets first and if she doesn't eat switch to super worms. She's fairly new so I'm trying to let her settle in first, because right now she's very skittish.
 

Jeff23

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Jul 27, 2016
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Thanks! I appreciate the help. I'm a super paranoid person when it comes to my animals and I've seem many horror stories of people leaving feeders in and their T's getting eaten. I'll probably try the crickets first and if she doesn't eat switch to super worms. She's fairly new so I'm trying to let her settle in first, because right now she's very skittish.
That is why I just give my small slings pre-kill (crickets) rather than dealing with the pain to trying to retrieve uneaten live prey. And when the T or prey burrows it adds another layer of complication. For juveniles and adult T's you can plan easily and roll the dice with live prey because they don't molt so often. Just make sure you keep up with the prior approximate molt date for peace of mind.
 

Rachel C

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2017
Messages
9
She ate! Thank you all soooo much. I know it's normal for them not to eat but it's always a reassurance when they do.
 
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