Feeding when hole is sealed.

Jonathan H

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Dec 26, 2018
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5
Ok I'm sure some of you have tarantulas that will seal off their hole, and stay underground while not being in premolt. So you start to freak out, because everyone says "if its hungry it will come out." Well I have found that not to be true. I have a Brachypelma Vagens and a Aphonopelma Seemanni blue that are in clear small critter keepers and they have dug tunnels along the bottom sides so you can see them. But both seal off their holes and both absolutely will not come out. I take my tongs and dig out the hole they filled up and drop in a dubia. Bamm they eat it like they haven't eaten in a year. So dont be afraid to try and feed just because they wont come out especially if you know it's not time for a molt.
 

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Thekla

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Sorry, but I have to disagree with you on that. When a T seals off its burrow it's usually a very clear "DO NOT DISTURB!" sign.

Please don't encourage people, especially beginners, to open up the burrow or even dig up their spiders. Not everyone can clearly see their spiders while buried, so, worst case scenario: The T is in process of moulting and they could disturb and possibly hurt them, especially when they put in a prey item that is still alive.

I have several spiders (among others my B. vagans) that buried themselves in when they were slings or smaller juveniles, and they always came out of their own volition, even if it took them a month or two.

Of course, there're exceptions to this rule... for example if you give a small sling a too large container with loads of substrate, they tend to feed worse. That's why experienced keeper like @cold blood always recommend smaller enclosures for better monitoring slings.

Also, @Tomoran has a video of his E. campestratus slings in which he mentions that this species doesn't always know whether they're hungry or not. ;)

But in general, when a T seals off its burrow, don't mess with it. Just be patient, maybe leave a prekilled feeder in front of its burrow and see if it comes out and eats, but that's all you should do. :)
 

Jonathan H

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Dec 26, 2018
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Sorry, but I have to disagree with you on that. When a T seals off its burrow it's usually a very clear "DO NOT DISTURB!" sign.

Please don't encourage people, especially beginners, to open up the burrow or even dig up their spiders. Not everyone can clearly see their spiders while buried, so, worst case scenario: The T is in process of moulting and they could disturb and possibly hurt them, especially when they put in a prey item that is still alive.

I have several spiders (among others my B. vagans) that buried themselves in when they were slings or smaller juveniles, and they always came out of their own volition, even if it took them a month or two.

Of course, there're exceptions to this rule... for example if you give a small sling a too large container with loads of substrate, they tend to feed worse. That's why experienced keeper like @cold blood always recommend smaller enclosures for better monitoring slings.

Also, @Tomoran has a video of his E. campestratus slings in which he mentions that this species doesn't always know whether they're hungry or not. ;)

But in general, when a T seals off its burrow, don't mess with it. Just be patient, maybe leave a prekilled feeder in front of its burrow and see if it comes out and eats, but that's all you should do. :)
Well if u read what I wrote then you would know that the Ts are not in premolt actually they just molted about a month ago. Now these are still small feeding once a week. And if I clear the hole and drop the food down in there and they dont want it i would take it back out but like i said they eat it every time. Everyone has there own opinion and way of doing things. I am by no means an expert but I have had these 2 for almost a year and their hole has never been opened unless I do it. So what are you supposed to do just let them come out on there own. No tried that went almost a month without eating. So is that good for a sling to go that long without eating? No didn't think so either. And yes I wish someone would have told me to do that. Like I said though everyone has their own way of doing things
 

FrmDaLeftCoast

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I agree with @Thekla comment. I'd also point out that if your able to see the T. And it's abdomen is plump. Even more of a reason to leavel it alone.
 

Thekla

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Well if u read what I wrote then you would know that the Ts are not in premolt actually they just molted about a month ago.
Well, you didn't mention that they moulted a month ago and haven't eaten since then (if I read that right). It sounded like it was just definitely not in premoult, but had eaten before.
But yes, if they're still tiny slings right after a moult I might've considered it myself. Like I clearly stated there're exceptions to the rule. But these mostly apply when the T in question is housed... let's say, inconveniently. I won't say 'incorrectly' because it's in their nature to burrow while still small. But if you have such problems feeding them you might consider rehousing them. Small slings tend to feed much better in a small container with less substrate to burrow.

How big are your slings anyway? What are the dimensions of their enclosures?

No tried that went almost a month without eating. So is that good for a sling to go that long without eating? No didn't think so either.
Almost a month without eating? For a tiny sling right after a moult, yes, that could be worrisome. For a larger sling or a small juvenile? No, I'd wait until it wants to come out and eat, even when it takes weeks or a month.
And in general, if the sling has fed before, even half a year without eating would be fine, if the abdomen isn't shrivelled and/or small. I have an H. chilensis sling that fasted for 5 months before it finally moulted.
 

The Grym Reaper

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It seems like they're slings housed in oversized enclosures and doing what slings do when housed in oversized enclosures (i.e. they tunnel to the twelfth plane of torment and then don't eat). Rehousing to smaller enclosures would likely fix the problem.

So what are you supposed to do just let them come out on there own.
Yes, because they actually will eventually.

I rehoused my juvenile vagans after his last moult and he sealed up his hide with dirt/webbing straight away, when he's due a feed I just leave pre-killed outside the entrance, he comes out and eats them and then seals himself back in again.

No tried that went almost a month without eating.
That's cute :rofl:

My 1.5" (at the time) B. albiceps sling went for over 4 months sealed in her burrow without food before I ran out of patience, dug her up and rehoused her (she ate twice and then moulted after that).

So is that good for a sling to go that long without eating? No didn't think so either.
It's not a problem, as already mentioned, they can go much longer without food, just make sure they have water available.
 
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Teal

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Someone should tell my B. albo sling that he shouldn't stay burrowed for months without eating :rofl:
 

Keke713

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My A. seemani sling has had her burrow closed off for about two months now. Still alive and kicking.
 

EulersK

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Encouraging people to dig a spider up is terrible advice at best, and dangerous at worst. Sorry, but you're simply wrong on this one.
 

The Seraph

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Sep 14, 2018
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I agree that you should not dig up a burrowed spider. I have only done it during a rehouse, which that and an emergency are the only reasons one should dig up a spider. Also, my B. Albopilosum sling has gone 2 months without eating. My B. hamorii juvenile had gone six months without eating. They can survive for long without food. Also, just because it eats that does not mean it needs food. I have had tarantulas eat a cricket and molt the very next day.
 

MintyWood826

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Sealed burrow = leave it alone. It will come out when it's ready. Digging up spiders is potentially risky. Healthy animals don't just starve themselves to death.

Tarantulas can live a long time without food, and this is a Brachypelma we're talking about. Fasts happen. Patience is necessary for this hobby. Make sure water is available and if you want, leave prekilled prey at the entrance.

Be patient.
 

wingedcoatl

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In all likelihood, if my wife came in at 4am and started shoving bites of pizza in my mouth I would say "whatever, pizza is awesome" but I would probably still wish somewhere in the back of my head if not out loud between bites that she had waited until I was ready to wake up.
 

Dennis Nedry

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Oct 21, 2017
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If you’re gonna open up the burrow and offer food at least crush its head, that way it can come out and get it when it wants and you don’t have to risk disturbing a moulting T
 

darkness975

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This thread should be locked as it serves no viable use to anyone. The OP has made it clear that he/she is going to do whatever they want with no regard to the spiders or the advice of others and new owners should not be taking this "advice."
 

RonC

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Oct 8, 2018
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My G.pulchripes sling burrowed and sealed it the middle of October. It emerged Christmas eve and left it's old clothes on the door step. Feeding day tomorrow. Maybe something soft like a meal worm.
 
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