feeding my ts honeybees

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archieph

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i just want to know if there is anyone out there who has done this.. because in my experience when i fed my tarantulas honeybees, their colors became more vibrant... im not exagerating and i know wat i saw.. tried it with several of my spiders and same result.. really their colors kinda glowed and became brighter... :? next time i get a chance i will post a before and after pic.. right now they are full so no feeding.. only risk i get is if it stings the tarantula.. could maybe die.. or not..
 

Musicwolf

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I saw your posts in the other threads and found it interesting (aside from the fact that I think wild prey is a little dangerous because of possible chemical poisoning). I was wondering if there was a way to remove the stingers before feeding them to your Ts? I assume removing the stinger would cause the bee to die a short while later (like it does after it stings someone), but hey, the bee is going to die a short while later anyway and it would be safer for the T.
 

xhexdx

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In case you missed it, Fran was being sarcastic.

Feeding bees to your spiders isn't the best idea, and I highly doubt it does what you claim it does...
 

archieph

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im serious..

yes i have thought of that.. if i deem the bee to be really healthy i take stinger out by stinging myself.. but i usually dont take the stinger out of newly hatched bees that fall to the ground wen practicing flight, usually take the weakened ones.. but really i know it's hard to believe and i am a no non sense guy.. so to prove to u all that it does make colors vibrant.. i will post a before and after honeybee meal pic soon.. js cant right now coz its raining hard now in my country and cant really open my hive to get some bees.. i think it must be the honey or pupa food! confirmed! not js from one of my ts but several of them.. after its meal, an hour or two later, its colors kind glow... :cool:
 

Fran

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I will wait eagerly for those pics :).
By the way, you dont need to sting yourself to get those stingers out, Norrris :D
 

archieph

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haha

it's fine.. i enjoy the little high it gives me.. sort of like getting a tattoo with a heated needle for like 30 minutes or so which gets hotter and hotter.. takes a little getting used too.. after about 2 days depending on how much venom it was able to inject the swelling usually cannot be noticed at all.. and yes wen the rain stops pouring here.. hopefully soon.. i will indeed prove to u that feeding ur ts honeybees will make their color glowing vibrant guaranteed!!! {D {D {D i js love the wall smiley.. thats 100% replica of me wanting to collect all the avics in the world in my lifetime :wall: :wall: :wall:
 

Hobo

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So you mean like, it will be all drab and then you feed it a honeybee, it will be suddenly more vibrant after an hour?
...cause I'm pretty sure tarantula exoskeletons don't work that way.:?
I mean, maybe after a molt, but definitely not after a few hours of eating. Here's some reading for you, on page 8, "A Clear Case of Color
Prejudice!". It's written by Shultz, author of the TKG. It strongly suggests that the color is set shortly after a molt and will not change significantly until another molt (other than normal wear/tear/fading).

Also, I don't see how a photo will prove anything. There are too many factors like lighting, angle, background that could gum things up... you'd have to take a photo at exactly the same angle with the exact same lighting with the tarantula in the exact same pose on the exact same surface before and after a meal for any difference in color to be valid.

And even then, it would be really easy to adjust the colors with some photo editing program (Not saying you would, but, I don't know you well enough to say you won't!).

No matter how I look at it, feeding bees to your Ts isn't a good idea, even if you remove the stinger (well maybe then, since you seem to enjoy it:D). A little brighter color isn't worth the risk, IMO.
 

Terry D

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Archie, Maybe you could spice up your sting regimen a bit and get yourself some Dasymutilla occidentalis. Those would feel really good-at least not totally unbearable. :)
 

CAK

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Is this thread for real? :? In the United States (and probably many other places), most people would classify you as missing a chromosome, if you really felt the need to sting yourself before feeding your tarantulas.
 

Fran

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Is this thread for real? :? In the United States (and probably many other places), most people would classify you as missing a chromosome, if you really felt the need to sting yourself before feeding your tarantulas.
HAHAHAHA ...aaah man, that made me choke..
 

RoachGirlRen

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A tarantula's coloration is not dynamic. The only time an exoskeleton tends to look brighter is when the animal has freshly molted. Feeding a bee to a T would not result in the tarantula magically developing a vibrant, "glowing," extra bright coloration any more than eating a steak would suddenly make your hair two shades lighter and shiny. I might be willing to believe that feeding a tarantula a certain diet may over time effect the pigment of a fresh exoskeleton (ie. diet in the preceeding months might affect the pigment of the fresh exo after shedding), kindof like feeding mealworms a diet high in colorants can result in changes in pigment over time. But tossing a bee to your tarantula and suddenly seeing it glow? Something sounds pretty fishy.
 

Musicwolf

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it's fine.. i enjoy the little high it gives me.. sort of like getting a tattoo with a heated needle for like 30 minutes or so which gets hotter and hotter.. takes a little getting used too.. after about 2 days depending on how much venom it was able to inject the swelling usually cannot be noticed at all.. and yes wen the rain stops pouring here.. hopefully soon.. i will indeed prove to u that feeding ur ts honeybees will make their color glowing vibrant guaranteed!!! {D {D {D i js love the wall smiley.. thats 100% replica of me wanting to collect all the avics in the world in my lifetime :wall: :wall: :wall:
Yeah, that's a bit more information about you than I wanted. Perhaps it's the fact that you sting yourself that makes you think your Ts are glowing?

Hobo, thanks for that article - - I think that about satisfies my curiosity in this thread.
 

CAK

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I'm wondering if that person isn't feeding the bees something laced with strychnine and then when we stings himself to feed the bees, he gets a little bit of that laced action!

"look!!! Amazing discovery, the bees eat the rat poison!!!!"


:wall:
 

archieph

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haha

well u know im not the only person i know who likes the bee stings.. i know one other person and me who likes the sting... but not as much as i like eating honey.. anyway about the pics.. yeah i figured even if i post u wont believe me.. but here's something i dare u to do... find a hive somewhere in your area.. im willing to bet my whole collection.. take the stinger out, in your own way, and then feed it to ur tarantula... if the color doesnt get vibrant call me a liar, id accept it... i promise in all that is good, FEEDING YOUR TARANTULA A HONEYBEE WILL MAKE ITS COLOR BRIGHTLY VIBRANT... im sure of it!!!!
 

CAK

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Another Crack Pot on the loose... I'm out. I have something much better to do like watch "dude where's my car".
 

archieph

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ok i read the article..

tnx btw, got more information than i wanted.. i correct myself in my first message about a couple of hours changing instantly.. i have been feeding my ts bees about 3 times before i noticed it actually became brightera few hours after i fed it again the 4th time.. so i cant really tell u for sure if its a one hit thing or an accumulation of meals.. but i still stand by my word that feeding your ts honeybees will make its color vibrant.. so since that article came out.. i will post a pic of my t before i start feeding it... and every time i feed it i will document it for u guys.. 4 feeedings is js about enough.. we can all observe it together in a span of maybe 2 weeks.. and we can all be the judge of it.. i am sure something in that bee is doing it.. my versicolor is about to molt.. it will be our test subject.. and at the end of the 2 weeks timeframe i have asked i will then gather the 2 pics from my documentation which i will post here and compare pics.. i will try to get same angle, location and lighting every shot.. starting photo 7 days after my versi molts.. whatever whether u believe me or not.. whether i believe wat i saw or not.. this will prove somehow that i am not crazy from all the bee stings, and that feeding ut ts honeybees does someything to its coloration.. maybe ur right thru continuous feeding.. but im sure there is some kind of mineral, vitamins, watsoever in the honeybee that affects the tarantula in some way biologically.. im a skeptic about this, but i will take time to prove to u and myself that indeed there is or there is none something going on with bees and tarantulas.. after all if you think about it, eating a coachroach with whatever gut load u have is not comparable to bees eating only a strict diet of honey and pollen which is scientifically proven to have lasting effects on humans.. even in cleopatras tomb a jar of honey was found.. and still edible.. so in turn it is like feeding hony to ur tarantula.. we shall see in a month or two if indeed i have some stand in all this.. i saw wat i saw.. and i say my ts color changed dramatically on a diet of honeybees ;P ;P ;P

---------- Post added at 03:28 AM ---------- Previous post was at 03:27 AM ----------

Archie, Maybe you could spice up your sting regimen a bit and get yourself some Dasymutilla occidentalis. Those would feel really good-at least not totally unbearable. :)
what is it and where do u get it?
 

jbm150

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Affecting the vibrancy of your Ts notwithstanding, two things I want to mention:

This has been said but I feel it needs to be repeated. You keep bees, are they allowed to fly off on their own to collect pollen? I can only imagine that they do. Please consider that in doing so, they potentially become contaminated with pesticides, fertilizers, misc. chemicals, parasites, etc. Not good for delicate tarantulas, especially slings.

Secondly, even with their stingers removed, many bees are still formidable. They have powerful mandibles. I'm not sure where in the lineup honeybees are in regards to bite strength (your species especially) but its something to consider if you're looking to take good care of your tarantulas....
 
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