Feeding burrowing spiderlings

Sephyiria

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 28, 2016
Messages
24
Greetings.

I am new to the hobby, so i am full of anxiety when it comes to my little guys/girls. Bought a bunch of LP slings two months ago, each around half an inch. It started ok, i fed them pre-killed small superworms, chopped to tiny bits, they seem to like it. Few days later, some of them had burrowed to the bottom of the enclosures. I read that you should NEVER try to dig a burrowing T out of its burrow, so i let them be. But it has been weeks now, and they havent eaten since the 1st meal i gave them. I always put chopped superworms at the entrance of their burrows on weekly basis, but they seem uninterested, so I took it out the next day. I know this is dumb, but should I drop the food into the burrow? they are so tiny, and i dont want to lose them. :anxious::anxious:

Thank you in advance.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
You read right - leave them be. Almost all NW terrestrials burrow as slings, it's perfectly normal. When they're ready for a molt, they will close up their burrow for a few days (or weeks) and eventually emerge larger and very hungry. I think that's where you might have misunderstood. If their burrows are wide open, then try to feed the exact same way you have been. Put in a piece of mealworm, and chances are that it'll be gone by the following morning. If not, as you've been doing, just remove it as to avoid mold. You don't want to ever drop food into a burrow, as it makes it nearly impossible to remove if need be. You will inevitably have a cricket or roach crawl down a burrow eventually. The best you can do at that point is hope to hear that distinct crunch.

These creatures have been at it for millions of years. They didn't make it this long by starving themselves to death ;) Are they plump? You seem to be coming along just fine, keep at it!
 

Sephyiria

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 28, 2016
Messages
24
You read right - leave them be. Almost all NW terrestrials burrow as slings, it's perfectly normal. When they're ready for a molt, they will close up their burrow for a few days (or weeks) and eventually emerge larger and very hungry. I think that's where you might have misunderstood. If their burrows are wide open, then try to feed the exact same way you have been. Put in a piece of mealworm, and chances are that it'll be gone by the following morning. If not, as you've been doing, just remove it as to avoid mold. You don't want to ever drop food into a burrow, as it makes it nearly impossible to remove if need be. You will inevitably have a cricket or roach crawl down a burrow eventually. The best you can do at that point is hope to hear that distinct crunch.

Thanks for your reply!

TBH i can hardly see how plump they are, considering they are always hiding in the burrows. What worries me is that, what if they are actually the lazy type and are waiting for food to enter the burrows, rather than ambushing them from the entrance. Is this a possibility? :bag:
 

Sephyiria

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 28, 2016
Messages
24
Thanks for your reply!

TBH i can hardly see how plump they are, considering they are always hiding in the burrows. What worries me is that, what if they are actually the lazy type and are waiting for food to enter the burrows, rather than ambushing them from the entrance. Is this a possibility? :bag:
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
Thanks for your reply!

TBH i can hardly see how plump they are, considering they are always hiding in the burrows. What worries me is that, what if they are actually the lazy type and are waiting for food to enter the burrows, rather than ambushing them from the entrance. Is this a possibility? :bag:
If they are lazy, they aren't hungry. If they are not hungry they don't need food. :D
Simple is better :)
 

johnny quango

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
262
Thanks for your reply!

TBH i can hardly see how plump they are, considering they are always hiding in the burrows. What worries me is that, what if they are actually the lazy type and are waiting for food to enter the burrows, rather than ambushing them from the entrance. Is this a possibility? :bag:
No is the short answer. A tarantula that isn't eating is simply not hungry or going into pre moult as a general rule, also as slings most tarantulas will burrow or in the case of arboreals will build a tight fitting tunnel as it gives them the feeling of being more secure in their habitat. Some will venture out after dark looking for prey so my advice would be to feed as normal and if the prey is still there 24hrs later remove it as it's a great indicator than the tarantula just doesn't want it you may find some eat and others don't but don't worry about it
 

N1ghtFire

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 17, 2016
Messages
173
I have an LP sling who almost never burrows, but my N. Chromatus spends all of its time in a burrow. It is probably 3/4" now. I feed it small live crickets, the T can feel the the cricket walking around near their burrow and they will come up and hunt them. I would just throw a live cricket in with each, they'll find them if they're hungry. Just made sure to remove the cricket if uneated and don't try to feed if you think they're in premolt. I have had much better success feeding all my slings live prey rather than prekilled food.
 
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