Feeder crickets keep trying to lay eggs in my scorpion enclosure. Can I prevent this?

alexbwkim

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 19, 2017
Messages
31
Is it harmful that feeder crickets are laying eggs in my scorpion's enclosure? If so, how can I prevent this from happening?
 

Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
You didn't say what kind of scoprion you have but if it's a forest species and the substrate is kept moist then cricket eggs have a chance at hatching but in a dry desert setup, they will likely dessicate and never hatch. I would say cut the butt (remove the ovipositor) or just take them out when you see them stabbing the dirt. The only other options I know of to prekill the cricket or only feed males.
 

alexbwkim

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 19, 2017
Messages
31
It is a desert species, so they should die out. Are there any detrimental effects to the eggs hatching?
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 27, 2017
Messages
351
You didn't say what kind of scoprion you have but if it's a forest species and the substrate is kept moist then cricket eggs have a chance at hatching but in a dry desert setup, they will likely dessicate and never hatch. I would say cut the butt (remove the ovipositor) or just take them out when you see them stabbing the dirt. The only other options I know of to prekill the cricket or only feed males.
how do you identify the mails?
 

Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
Females have a stick on their butt. You can cut it off but in an arid environment it's not necessary. The eggs probably won't hatch
 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 27, 2010
Messages
2,059
It's not a big deal. I've had it happen from time to time - sometimes I'll see the cricket eggs up against the glass (in which case I'll scoop them out and put them in the enclosure of something that likes tiny food) but more often I'll just suddenly start noticing itty-bitty crickets hopping around in one of the enclosures. Because there isn't much of anything suitable for them to eat in the enclosures, they usually die out pretty quickly - particularly in arid enclosures.
 
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