Excess webbing

clive 82

Arachnoknight
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Hi guys.
So I always remove any excess webbing from my B smithi enclosure the following day after feeding ( the web mat ).
I read that the webbing can harbour any bolus or other waste which seems to be the case. But was chatting the other day & was told that removing the webbing can "stress" the T.
Was just wondering what anyone else does, am I doing the right thing?
 

YagerManJennsen

Arachnobaron
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Jan 3, 2016
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I see no reason to remove webbing. Just look at a GBB enclosure, you would drive yourself mad trying to remove every piece of webbing. Also the web acts as sort of a security measure, it lets the T know where it is and that it is in it's own territory.

Just let the T do what the T does best which is be a T. also I have never heard of webbing mats holding a bolus, if it does just pick out the bolus and leave the web.
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
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I see no reason to remove webbing. Just look at a GBB enclosure, you would drive yourself mad trying to remove every piece of webbing. Also the web acts as sort of a security measure, it lets the T know where it is and that it is in it's own territory.

Just let the T do what the T does best which is be a T. also I have never heard of webbing mats holding a bolus, if it does just pick out the bolus and leave the web.
Well I have to admit that I did think of the heavy webbing species such as GBB & yeah it would be a nightmare removing all that webbing lol!
Thanks for the advice, Ill leave the webbing alone & let the T do its thing.
 

14pokies

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How would you like it if came into your house and stole your table everytime you got done eating? ;-)
 

clive 82

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No you aren't.
Thanks Viper, answers my question. Will let the T do its thing. That's what I like about this forum, you can get a lot of advice from lots of experienced keepers rather than reading 1 persons point of view of which the info given was kinda invalid anyway.
 

EulersK

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Spider web is anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and retains moisture in substrate underneath. Webbing is always a good thing :)
 

clive 82

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Spider web is anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and retains moisture in substrate underneath. Webbing is always a good thing :)
That's really interesting to know. Thanks very much for the info.
 

Poec54

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Spider's lives revolve silk, it's part of almost everything they do, and it's one of the ways they identify their home. No need for the Mrs Doubtfire thing.
 

clive 82

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Spider's lives revolve silk, it's part of almost everything they do, and it's one of the ways they identify their home. No need for the Mrs Doubtfire thing.
That makes perfect sense really. It could also explain why it has been a bit active lately? If the webbing is constantly removed maybe it doesn't feel "at home" in its enclosure?
 

Poec54

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That makes perfect sense really. It could also explain why it has been a bit active lately? If the webbing is constantly removed maybe it doesn't feel "at home" in its enclosure?

Everywhere any spider walks, it leaves a dragline. Since most of a tarantula's walking is inside and just outside of it's retreat, silk accumulates there. That helps tarantulas to identify their home by touch (lacking good eyesight). When an intruder/predator approaches they dash inside on the silk runway. That's also why some will bury their waterbowls: potholes in the runway to the retreat can slow them down enough that a predator gets them. They need a smooth track in emergencies. When they see a shadow of a bird swooping down or a mongoose approaching, milliseconds count.
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
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Everywhere any spider walks, it leaves a dragline. Since most of a tarantula's walking is inside and just outside of it's retreat, silk accumulates there. That helps tarantulas to identify their home by touch (lacking good eyesight). When an intruder/predator approaches they dash inside on the silk runway. That's also why some will bury their waterbowls: potholes in the runway to the retreat can slow them down enough that a predator gets them. They need a smooth track in emergencies. When they see a shadow of a bird swooping down or a mongoose approaching, milliseconds count.
Fascinating stuff! Most of the webbing is around the enterance to the hide. I will definitely be leaving the webbing alone lol!
 

johnny quango

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May 17, 2013
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262
thats a lot for a small T
She's a fully grown adult and only around 2.5" they are a fantastic species to keep. I actually respect her more than any other tarantula I own as I've heard they pack a serious punch venom wise being a dwarf baboon
 
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