Euryurids are easy-to-care-for attractive millipedes

ErinM31

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Feb 25, 2016
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I have both Auturus evides and Euryurus leachii. I keep each species in its own 16 oz clear deli-style container filled with a mixture of coir, fermented oak sawdust, and any other decaying hardwood that I've baked and can crumble into dust and small bits. Keep all of it moist but not water-logged (the coir helps in judging this). After getting the initial moisture level right, a spritz or so of water a few times a week is all that is needed, depending on ventilation (the lid can be well ventilated as long as the substrate is DEEP). They'll be happy with this food but also seem to appreciate the occasional fish food bit. They do well at room temperature which at present means varying between 75 and 82F. (@Harlequin had abundant success keeping A. evides at 72F.) The are lively millipedes which you may often see on the surface or burrowing. They also brightly fluoresce under blacklight. And pedelings! If you have both genders and maintain conditions as described above you'll have the pitter patter of little feet before long! :happy:

All-in-all, a very enjoyable and easy species to keep! BugsInCyberspace sells them -- generally E. leachii or E. maculatus (which Orin McMonigle describes as an even hardier captive than E. leachii) or possibly A. becki (it would take dissection to tell apart sympatric Euryurids but they all have the same care requirements).

Here are my Auturus evides with pedelings. :happy: There are usually fewer young on the surface but I crumbled in a fish food pellet this morning.
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Here is their enclosure:
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One formed a molting chamber against the wall:
image.jpeg
 

Aquarimax

Arachnoprince
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Great info! What is the maximum size for these diminutive species?
 

ErinM31

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Feb 25, 2016
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Those young are insanely small. Like springtail size :astonished:
Yes, they are, but easily differentiated by shape, manner of moving and number of legs. ;) It is definitely a reason to keep these millipedes with deep substrate as the young can easily desiccate or alternately drown in a condensation droplet. As far as I can tell, my pedelings are doing well and I keep seeing more and more of them! :happy:
 

ErinM31

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Update: The pedelings have grown a LOT in 4.5 months! :astonished:

Auturus evides (two adults are on the left while the rest are immatures, the largest of which are showing the first sign of their adult colors):

IMG_1806.JPG
 

NMWAPBT

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Jan 23, 2010
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188
I was hoping you could tell me how to differentiate between the two. I'm keeping a species I thought was auturus evides but recently someone said might be euryurus leachii. I had found these guys in northern Illinois if that helps any. 20200216_020539.jpg 20191018_220813.jpg
 

NopusNatus

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Jul 20, 2018
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I was hoping you could tell me how to differentiate between the two. I'm keeping a species I thought was auturus evides but recently someone said might be euryurus leachii. I had found these guys in northern Illinois if that helps any. View attachment 338465 View attachment 338466
It’s impossible to tell the 2 apart by appearance. The only true way to tell them apart is a difference in the male gonopods. Location can also give us a better idea of the species. Unfortunately Northern Illinois will have both species. Auturus evides is found in Iowa and Euryurus leachii is found in Indiana. If you live in Northwest or Northeast Illinois you can better estimate what species you have, but it would still just be a guess.
 

NMWAPBT

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Messages
188
It’s impossible to tell the 2 apart by appearance. The only true way to tell them apart is a difference in the male gonopods. Location can also give us a better idea of the species. Unfortunately Northern Illinois will have both species. Auturus evides is found in Iowa and Euryurus leachii is found in Indiana. If you live in Northwest or Northeast Illinois you can better estimate what species you have, but it would still just be a guess.
I gotcha! Kind of what I've been finding out trying to Google pictures of the two. I'm in Freeport ....north western Illinois btw but not far enough west I think it would make a difference. Thank you for your help!
 
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