Euathlus sp red

magicmed

Arachnobaron
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Well I saw the little bugger and figured I wouldn't get a better buy on one so I ordered it. It's 1/2" and unsexed. Just had a couple questions about it.

How long should I expect it to stay small? I have heard they're very slow growers, are we talking a half inch a year? Or less?

As far as humidity/ substrate what should I aim for? More dry with a corner of moist near the water dish? Or do they need a bit more humidity than that? Which brings me to ventilation, are they as sensitive as avics at this stage?

Anything else I should watch out for/ be aware of? Very excited for this little bugger.

On a side note, also going to be having an Aphonopelma hentzi, N. Incei, and a couple A. Avics coming soon! :)
 

Jon B

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The species will mature in anywhere from 5 to 7 years. I'm using eco earth substrate, just let the substrate dry out before you add the tarantula. The Euathlus Sp. Red likes it dry, don't mist the enclosure, and don't add moss. I personally don't wet any corner, and she seems to enjoy it. If there's not enough humidity a T will sit on their water dish all day. And if it's too humid they will climb to avoid the substrate.
Be aware that the Euathlus Sp. Red are naturally active and enjoys climbing occasionally so they need several inches of substrate to avoid fatal falls. It can go on fasts, and I've found that my own Euathlus Sp. Red will not attack large crickets, don't know if that's just mine though. She will take medium ones, and super worms. Oh and last but not least, they can be a little skittish at times.
 

Vanessa

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I have had my two since April 17th. They have moulted every month since - almost to the day. They are still not much larger than when I got them - which was at 1/4". They came in vials with coco fibre sub and I haven't moved them out. I do have a small piece of sphagnum moss in there that I will normally wet when I see that they are about to moult. The rest of the time it is pretty dry. One of mine has burrowed and the other hasn't.
I feed them twice a week and they almost never turn down food. I have small meal worms which I cut the heads off of and cut in half - each of them gets a half. Sometimes I will have pin head crickets and I will stun one (until it is nearly dead) and put it in while it is still moving around a bit. They will eat them too.
I adore mine... really adore them. Even at this size they are living up to their reputation as being curious and 'friendly'. The burrowing one might run into their burrow when I first open the lid, but comes right back out again. I love them to death. I do wish they would get bigger just because I am so worried about them at this age.
You will love them... I promise.
 

PanzoN88

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E. Sp. red are definitely a must own. You will be waiting a while for it to grow from what I understand, I was fortunate enough to get an adult female. My adult is kept dry, although I overflow the water dish every now and then.
 

cold blood

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At 1/2" it should be kept on damp sub (or at the very least partially). For slings I use minimal ventilation to prevent it from drying too fast.

A 1/2" sling is too small to be kept dry.
 

viper69

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Well I saw the little bugger and figured I wouldn't get a better buy on one so I ordered it. It's 1/2" and unsexed. Just had a couple questions about it.

How long should I expect it to stay small? I have heard they're very slow growers, are we talking a half inch a year? Or less?

As far as humidity/ substrate what should I aim for? More dry with a corner of moist near the water dish? Or do they need a bit more humidity than that? Which brings me to ventilation, are they as sensitive as avics at this stage?

Anything else I should watch out for/ be aware of? Very excited for this little bugger.
How much did you pay for the Red?

It depends on the gender. If it's male, it could mature and reach full size in 1 year. My E sp Yellow (not too different than Reds) MM did that.

Most report they are slow growers. I have not had that experience. I also feed mine as much as they will eat, I don't keep mine on a Nazi feeding program like some T owners do. I want my slings to grow, that's their job!

I have a E sp Red I received Nov 2013 at 1/4". It has molted 6 times since then, DLS a bit larger than a 50 cent piece.

Husbandry, no different than any other basic NW terrestrial with the following exception
  1. Provide deep substrate for them to burrow. They are constant excavators, truly little bulldozers, esp when they are slings and juvis. I gave my 1/4" sling about 3" of sub with cork bark slabs. Sometimes they will excavate and literally stop in place seemingly lifeless, and the next day they pick up where they left off frozen in place. It's rather unusual compared to other species I've owned.
  2. Provide them smaller prey than one would normally for same sized T- they prefer smaller prey for some reason/s more often than not.
I provide them a water dish (I never over flow it), cork bark, nothing more, but I also feed mine often. Ventilation no different than a typical NW terrestrial. In a 4"x4"x4" cube, I have 4 holes across the top of each side of the container, small diameter drill bit so they can't escape.


NOTE: This T will walk around often at times. For some unknown reason to me, they are very aware of when the lid comes off. Once they know this, they will readily walk up the container wall and out of the container. They aren't very fast, but with a 2" T and the right size container, you can easily turn your back for 20 seconds and your T will be gone. It's this behavior that many of us E sp Red enthusiasts call them "curious". I don't own a single T that will do this. But this locality has no fear. They are a VERY docile T (only 1 person on the board has reported owning a Red that is a hell spawn demon) so be careful w/them, slow moving etc. I've never had them flick or go into a threat pose.

MM E sp Yellow- I've posted other images of my AF E sp Red in other threads.



I've found that my own Euathlus Sp. Red will not attack large crickets, don't know if that's just mine though
It isn't just you. My AF female rarely will do so. They are quite particularl about prey size and often wait extremely long amounts of time when hunting to attack. I don't know what they are waiting for, but I've watched all of mine follow the cricket around waiting for the "right" moment whatever that is to them to attack. Far different than any other T I've owned. Far more "patient".
 
Last edited:

viper69

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Side note, @viper69, those of us in the rainforest theme can't see your very helpful note ;)
You don't see the text?? That's odd. I can see the text, albeit difficult to see.

That theme is poor because it doesn't offer a good contrast with black front, a common color used on forums!

Try that!


NOTE: This T will walk around often at times. For some unknown reason to me, they are very aware of when the lid comes off. Once they know this, they will readily walk up the container wall and out of the container. They aren't very fast, but with a 2" T and the right size container, you can easily turn your back for 20 seconds and your T will be gone. It's this behavior that many of us E sp Red enthusiasts call them "curious". I don't own a single T that will do this. But this locality has no fear. They are a VERY docile T (only 1 person on the board has reported owning a Red that is a hell spawn demon) so be careful w/them, slow moving etc. I've never had them flick or go into a threat pose.

MM E sp Yellow- I've posted other images of my AF E sp Red in other threads.
 

EulersK

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You don't see the text?? That's odd. I can see the text, albeit difficult to see.

That theme is poor because it doesn't offer a good contrast with black front, a common color used on forums!

Try that!


NOTE: This T will walk around often at times. For some unknown reason to me, they are very aware of when the lid comes off. Once they know this, they will readily walk up the container wall and out of the container. They aren't very fast, but with a 2" T and the right size container, you can easily turn your back for 20 seconds and your T will be gone. It's this behavior that many of us E sp Red enthusiasts call them "curious". I don't own a single T that will do this. But this locality has no fear. They are a VERY docile T (only 1 person on the board has reported owning a Red that is a hell spawn demon) so be careful w/them, slow moving etc. I've never had them flick or go into a threat pose.

MM E sp Yellow- I've posted other images of my AF E sp Red in other threads.
Everything on my computer is in a black-ish theme, if given the option. I spend hours per day on my computer (at work and at home), and it's much easier on the eyes for me. I imagine you'd lose your mind if you saw what I have the contrast set to. So yeah, I can see the black text, but it's impossible to read without highlighting it. Thank you for those bright yellow words to help an old man's eyes!

More on topic, what would you say the most defensive Euathlus species would be? You preach E. sp. "Red" and "Yellow" for beginners, but my E. truculentus would be terrible for a beginner.
 

viper69

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More on topic, what would you say the most defensive Euathlus species would be? You preach E. sp. "Red" and "Yellow" for beginners, but my E. truculentus would be terrible for a beginner.
Once you leave Red/Yellows, it seems the rest of the E sp (insert color) Ts have varying dispositions, all more skittish than Red/Yellows, some even defensive (I attribute that to individuals). We see beginners own GBBs, and generally speaking if they can handle those, they can handle any of the other non-Red/Yellows I've observed so far. I don't think one is any better than other at that point, but I could be wrong.
 

Storm76

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Red / Yellow are calm and curious, sp. "blue femur" and others are more on the skittish side, but usually not bitey either although chances are considerably higher as they get spooked very easily.
 

magicmed

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OK another question, at .5" should I keep it in a 16oz deli cup? Or should I go ahead with this size sterlite container? I know they like to walk around a lot, or is that too much space for such a little one?
 

Attachments

saturnthegrey

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Jan 15, 2016
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Looks good to me. I use a round container that has a little less space than this. The little guy is always crawling around on the fake plants and I always find it walking around, like it is exploring haha
 

Trenor

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OK another question, at .5" should I keep it in a 16oz deli cup? Or should I go ahead with this size sterlite container? I know they like to walk around a lot, or is that too much space for such a little one?
I would not go bigger then the 16oz Deli cup for a sling that small. They will have plenty of roam space, a hide and water dish.
 

Vanessa

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I would not use the larger enclosure either at that size. I would stick to small and cozy for now. They often burrow, so they probably won't use 95% of a larger enclosure anyway.
 

viper69

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OK another question, at .5" should I keep it in a 16oz deli cup? Or should I go ahead with this size sterlite container? I know they like to walk around a lot, or is that too much space for such a little one?
Deli cup or even condiment cup would work.
 

Blue Jaye

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I have Sp. blue and green as wall as red. All of the blue and green are rather skittish except for one female sp blue. She seems to think she's an sp red as she always takes the walk about when the lid is off and she's extremely docile.
 

Storm76

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I have Sp. blue and green as wall as red. All of the blue and green are rather skittish except for one female sp blue. She seems to think she's an sp red as she always takes the walk about when the lid is off and she's extremely docile.
Lucky you! I have 3 slings E. sp. "blue femur" sitting here (2 susp. males and 1 female) and they're all insanely skittish, easy to spook and only take off out of the cage if something bothers them. But they're great eaters until full, then they smack the hell out of an offered feeder.

Kinda prefer my E. sp. "red" really, since they're way calmer and don't freak out when disturbed. I like their "curious" nature.

Also, to the OP: I'd keep always a part of the sub moist, they come from an area that's rather close to river and can be found often sitting on the moist substrate. Keeping mine 70/30 (dry/moist) towards that end.
 
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