Euathlus sp red, heating.

scottcooper352

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
2
Hey everyone. This is my first post on arachnoboards, so I apologize if its under the wrong board or in the wrong forum, or if these questions have already been answered. I'm sure you guys deal with clueless newbies like me all the time, so thanks for putting up with us. Anyways, I've done some lurking, but couldn't seem to find anything conclusive.

I've been considering getting a tarantula for some time now, and after researching species for some time now, I've got my heart set on a eualthlus sp red, mainly because of their small size and calm temperament, although I know they can be rather expensive and difficult to find.

I've decided to use a medium kritter keeper for an enclosure, with a few inches of peat moss and vermiculite for a substrate, and overfill a small water dish in one corner for some humidity.

The only thing I'm stumped on is temperature and heating. I cannot seem to find any two discussions which agree on the proper temperatures and heating methods for tarantulas. My house is usually around 60 to 64 degrees Fahrenheit. Most care sheets seem to agree that T's should be in temperatures ranging from 70 to 80 degrees to thrive, but a lot of posts I've come across say that as long as it's not "too cold" that heating is unnecessary. What, specifically, is a good temp for a euathlus sp red?

Supposing that my tarantula indeed needs temperatures a good ten degrees warmer than my house, what would be the best method of heating a plastic kritter keeper? I've heard some say to adhere a heating pad to one side, and others say that this method is completely worthless and ineffective. Some recommend heat lamps, while others insist this will end in a cooked tarantula. (not to mention melted plastic.)

I'm kinda stumped, any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

sasker

Arachnoangel
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
794
Hi scottcooper352, welcome to Arachnoboards and congratulations on the excellent choice to start keeping tarantulas and Euathlus sp red as your first one! This species is quite easy to keep and quite hardy when it comes to temperatures. Last winter, I was abroad longer than I expected to be and it got really cold where I live. Outside temperatures dropped to around -30 F, so the temperature in my apartment must have been around 60. When I got back, my Euatlus sp red was fine, albeit a bit thirsty :)

Your tarantula will survive temps between 60-64, but I think it is too low for it to thrive. Is this the all year round average? If you have only one tarantula I think it is a bit overdone to heat the entire room to a cozy 70-80 degrees. I have still a modest number of Ts and when I think it is getting too cold for them I place them on a shelve in a cabinet with a glass door. I then place a small 5 watt heat mat on the shelve as well. The heat mat is placed between two critter boxes housing tarantulas, leaving enough space between them so the heat can disperse into the rest of the compartment of the cabinet where the critter boxes are. A thermometer in the same compartment ensures you that the temperature is not getting too high.

I advice against using heat lamps. There is no way to go for the tarantula if the temperature gets too high if the heat lamp covers the entire critter keeper. And do not place a heat mat under your terrarium. It is best to place it to the side, or create a higher ambient temperature as described above.

Success with your project! I am sure the other members of this forum will have more advice for you. :)
 

ronoverdrive

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 27, 2017
Messages
11
In their natural climate the average year round temperature is about room temperature (71F/21C). Keeping them about room temp should be fine. If you need to keep a space heater in the room your T's are in to keep the temps up. Otherwise you can always create a micro-climate like this one. Doesn't mean they can't survive in 60 - 64F, but it will be sub-optimal for them. An alternative to look at is the Euathlus sp. "Tiger" which is a cousin to the Red. They can be a lot cheaper though sometimes they can be just as hard to find. They are very attractive T's from another region of Chile where the average temps are around 60F/15C year round as they live closer to the sea then the Reds.
 

boina

Lady of the mites
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Mar 25, 2015
Messages
2,205
DO NOT try to raise the temps for your E. sp. red to 80F. They definitely need cooler temps, as @ronoverdrive already said. Mine are thriving at 65-68F half of the year (winter). I actually keep them on the lowest shelf so they can enjoy the lowest temps. In summer the temps get a lot higher, though. If you want to raise the temps just a little bit there are a lot of options. Heat pads or even heat lamps work as long as - and this is important - you keep them some distance AWAY from your enclosure and use them to raise the ambient temps. If you set up a micro climate like in the video shown make sure it doesn't get too humid in there. E. sp. red does not survive high humidity. I don't even overflow the water dish for mine, but that depends on where exactly you live and what the ambient humidity is in your area.
 

scottcooper352

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
2
Thanks to everyone for their advice! I know Euathlus is a dwarf species; would it be best to spend extra money on an adult as opposed to a spiderling? I've read some threads online where owners were having trouble finding suitable prey for euathlus spiderlings, as their small size and slow growth rate would make things like crickets a little too big for them to capture/eat.

I know there are plenty of threads on this already, but I know caring for a spiderling can be a bit more complicated than caring for an adult T. As a complete newbie to spiders and arachnid pets in general, should I spring for an adult?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
12,372
Thanks to everyone for their advice! I know Euathlus is a dwarf species; would it be best to spend extra money on an adult as opposed to a spiderling? I've read some threads online where owners were having trouble finding suitable prey for euathlus spiderlings, as their small size and slow growth rate would make things like crickets a little too big for them to capture/eat.

I know there are plenty of threads on this already, but I know caring for a spiderling can be a bit more complicated than caring for an adult T. As a complete newbie to spiders and arachnid pets in general, should I spring for an adult?
This is not a hard species to raise from a spiderling. The slings are small, usually about 1/3" DLS, sometimes 1/4". They will scavenge feed however. I can't say it would be best, but it would make your life easier if you purchased one that is larger, say over an inch.
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
675
They can be pretty tiny as slings, and take a while to grow. If this is your first one, your patience with a sling might run thin after spending a whole year with a tiny pink freckle with legs. They are ridiculously adorable, though! But best to get one a little older, I think. As far as temps go, the micro climate idea stated above is a good bet if you're really worried. But honestly, the best rule of thumb for most Ts is if you're comfortable in a T-shirt, they'll be fine. Trying to chase down a temperature range isn't really necessary, as Ts are pretty adaptable animals.

Great choice for a first T. Really uniquely pretty, and one of the more charismatic of spiders. But be warned, this species can go on long fasting periods. A couple months of refusing food can cause lots of anxiety for someone who isn't used to the idea.

Also, great choice coming here for advice! Try to avoid online caresheets. They seem to be perceived as credible sources by new keepers, but they are usually very far from that. This forum is filled with real T owners and breeders with decades of experience with just about every species you can possibly get your hands on.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
12,372
Also, regarding growth rates, I have a E. sp. Yellow, started out at 1/4-1/3". Reached full maturity in 1.5 yr. sp Yellow is VERY similar to sp. Red.

I have a sp Red received at 1/4", received 11/13, and it's about 1.5 DLS, maybe 1.75". It's a true miniature version of an adult in all ways. So that's 4 years of growth. It's likely female based on my observations, but we will see. It certainly resembles my AF E. sp Red ventraly and body shape wise.

 

scottcooper352

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
2
Oh my gosh, (she?) is absolutely gorgeous. Well, my parents will not let me keep a spider at home, my mom insists she will kill it if I get one, so I'll have to wait until September, when I move out of the house. One question: can anyone give me some ideas or recommendations for what to use as a water dish for such a small spider? I know it has to be shallow, but how big should it be? Should the tarantula be able to fit their whole body in it, as to be standing completely in the water?
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,613
Oh my gosh, (she?) is absolutely gorgeous. Well, my parents will not let me keep a spider at home, my mom insists she will kill it if I get one, so I'll have to wait until September, when I move out of the house. One question: can anyone give me some ideas or recommendations for what to use as a water dish for such a small spider? I know it has to be shallow, but how big should it be? Should the tarantula be able to fit their whole body in it, as to be standing completely in the water?
If your sling is over an inch you can use a bottle cap, if not they don't necessarily need a water dish just yet. You can wet a small portion of the substrate for anything that's smaller, be mindful not to over do it.

Enjoy your new T!
 
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