Escape Prevention & Recapturing Runaways

Jake J

Arachnochode
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Sep 12, 2016
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10
When I rehouse a T, I use a big tote. They dart out and to a corner before going anywhere else. Then I can use a catch cup of the go up. Normally they don't. Once they go in the corners, place the new enclosure near them and boom. They go in it.
Big tote, like a bag?
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
I prefer to rehouse on the weekend and early in the A.M. After all, they are nocturnal, and slow down after a night of feeding and redecorating.

Terrestrial and OBs, I use either the 55 gl. tall or 70 gl. aquarium, whichever both enclosures fit into. Catch cup, long stem paintbrush and, my favorite, large plastic spoon. FYI, coated the 4 sides with Rain-X, virtually impossible for them to climb up.

Arboreal are much easier, my method, and faster. I build all my enclosures and fabricated "transfer tunnel/bridge" to fit between them. Simply affix bridge to new enclosure and butt the old to it. Through the vent holes gently coerce the T into its new home. Slid a blank piece of thin acrylic behind the bridge and remove bridge. While closing door slid away the blank and the deed is done. Zero escapes, but still keep a catch cup ready just in case. Photos of a sling transfer and a juvenile transfer.
 

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Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
No, like a plastic bin. I just housed two H. macs. Female is the one house in the photo.
I have a few of those bins, that's a great idea! I've been using the bathtub with the drain covered, but it's a small bathroom so less space to work with, which would surely complicate things if one made it over the side of the tub.
 

Redneck

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I have a few of those bins, that's a great idea! I've been using the bathtub with the drain covered, but it's a small bathroom so less space to work with, which would surely complicate things if one made it over the side of the tub.
The bathtub is a great place to use. I've used it many times. The one thing to know about Ts. Even the fast OW Ts. They don't run forever. And if they're running, they're looking to hide. So normally, (not all the time) they run and hunker down. And they only give little bursts. Run here, stop. Run there, stop. No reason to be panicky. As many have stated on this forum a thousand times. The t is more afraid of you than you are of it. Some may be more defensive. But it's afraid for its life. So it's trying its little heart out to defend itself.
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
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10
The bathtub is a great place to use. I've used it many times. The one thing to know about Ts. Even the fast OW Ts. They don't run forever. And if they're running, they're looking to hide. So normally, (not all the time) they run and hunker down. And they only give little bursts. Run here, stop. Run there, stop. No reason to be panicky. As many have stated on this forum a thousand times. The t is more afraid of you than you are of it. Some may be more defensive. But it's afraid for its life. So it's trying its little heart out to defend itself.
Yeah, and I'm aware of those things, and haven't yet had any major difficulty in rehousing or anything. My P. muticus had me just a bit worried after seeing the speed it's capable of running, as it was my first OW with a reputation for defensiveness rather than hiding in its burrow (looking at you, H. lividum). I like to be mentally over-prepared rather than under, so I felt my concern was at a healthy level and wasn't fright. But even muticus followed the patterns you mentioned, and I never even got so much as a threat posture from it. I don't expect it to always be so easy, but want to be as prepared as possible for an undesired response--much more so for the well-being of the T than for myself.
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
I prefer to rehouse on the weekend and early in the A.M. After all, they are nocturnal, and slow down after a night of feeding and redecorating.

Terrestrial and OBs, I use either the 55 gl. tall or 70 gl. aquarium, whichever both enclosures fit into. Catch cup, long stem paintbrush and, my favorite, large plastic spoon. FYI, coated the 4 sides with Rain-X, virtually impossible for them to climb up.

Arboreal are much easier, my method, and faster. I build all my enclosures and fabricated "transfer tunnel/bridge" to fit between them. Simply affix bridge to new enclosure and butt the old to it. Through the vent holes gently coerce the T into its new home. Slid a blank piece of thin acrylic behind the bridge and remove bridge. While closing door slid away the blank and the deed is done. Zero escapes, but still keep a catch cup ready just in case. Photos of a sling transfer and a juvenile transfer.
That's quite a setup you've got there, and sounds like a great method.

Rain-X, really? That's not dangerous for the T?

Also, where do you find those enclosures? I've found small AMAC containers that are awesome for slings, but I've had a heck of a time finding larger clear containers that aren't crazy expensive. Would love to find a source so I could create my own--I've grown fond of making them and have even taken to the soldering iron method over the hot drill bit for poking ventilation holes. I think they look pretty nice and are much better for display than the frosty Sterilite containers.
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
That's quite a setup you've got there, and sounds like a great method.

Rain-X, really? That's not dangerous for the T?

Also, where do you find those enclosures? I've found small AMAC containers that are awesome for slings, but I've had a heck of a time finding larger clear containers that aren't crazy expensive. Would love to find a source so I could create my own--I've grown fond of making them and have even taken to the soldering iron method over the hot drill bit for poking ventilation holes. I think they look pretty nice and are much better for display than the frosty Sterilite containers.
The round enclosures are just empty 40 oz. peanut butter containers I invert for arboreal slings. I build all the larger enclosures from sheets of acrylic. Quite simple to make only takes a bit of my time and much cheaper than buying them. I'd go broke if I had to buy manufactured ones for all the arboreals I have.
Holes are drilled in all the pieces prior to being epoxied together. Even drill the 40 oz. holes using my Dremel, don't like the fumes from melting them.
As far as the Rain-X is concerned, no problems, doubtful once it has dried on the glass. They are rarely trying to climb the sides where applied, rehousings usually go rather smoothly. I usually rehouse around 7AM, and they are winding down from their night time activities. Plus the fact I feed them heavily the night before the rehouse and that helps too.
In the past I've done the "bag method" and the "bathroom ordeal", neither are to my liking. Everyone has their preferred method for rehousing Ts, not the best for all, but the best for them. I like my own methods and they work well for me. ;)
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
I got in trouble recently with one of my small 1/3" Aphonopelma marxi slings. I have numerous really small slings (1/8" to 1/3"). Most of them are burrowing so I have created the bad habit of lifting the cup up and using a magnifier to try to locate the part of the sling back inside the hide or a burrow hole for it. Well this swift little marxi went up the side of the 5.5 oz cup and back down the outside and was up under the cup upside down in a flash while I was holding the cup by the lip. I didn't have an appropriate cup that would work in this situation so I immediately put my hand up below it just in case the spider fell. Suddenly I got to hold my first T as it jumped on my hand and started trying to crawl on top of the hairs on my arm. I then guided it back down into its home where it tried to escape again just as the lid had already closed. So my advice is that a hairy arm works great. I am curious on what others do for their really small slings.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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FYI, coated the 4 sides with Rain-X, virtually impossible for them to climb up
Very interesting I hadn't considered that. A friend of mine got the idea of using olive oil to prevent escapes. He got the idea from a thread here in the forum. Not sure where that thread is though.

So my advice is that a hairy arm works great.
An owner of a adult GBB has told me that carpeting slowed their GBB down considerably. I haven't tried that hah.

I am curious on what others do for their really small slings.
I have slings that size and smaller at times. It depends on how fast they are and their demeanor for me. Usually I use the bag transfer method for very fast Ts. It also depends on what the next container will be. If it's much larger, I will take the small vial, and lay it on its site inside the larger one. It may take a while but many Ts will come out and setup shop in the larger container.

Other times I open the lid and just do a vial to vial transfer. It really depends on the T.

In my recent N. incei rehousing, they burrow nicely, and line it with silk quite a bit. So, for one, I removed it while it was inside its burrow and put the old burrow into the new container, slowly guiding the T out of the silk "bag".

I've never needed to use a magnifying glass to find the T for a rehouse, even when 1/8" or smaller.

The smaller they are, the easier they are to rehouse. You can't scoop out an 8" T necessarily.
 

Jeff23

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Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
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Very interesting I hadn't considered that. A friend of mine got the idea of using olive oil to prevent escapes. He got the idea from a thread here in the forum. Not sure where that thread is though.



An owner of a adult GBB has told me that carpeting slowed their GBB down considerably. I haven't tried that hah.



I have slings that size and smaller at times. It depends on how fast they are and their demeanor for me. Usually I use the bag transfer method for very fast Ts. It also depends on what the next container will be. If it's much larger, I will take the small vial, and lay it on its site inside the larger one. It may take a while but many Ts will come out and setup shop in the larger container.

Other times I open the lid and just do a vial to vial transfer. It really depends on the T.

In my recent N. incei rehousing, they burrow nicely, and line it with silk quite a bit. So, for one, I removed it while it was inside its burrow and put the old burrow into the new container, slowly guiding the T out of the silk "bag".

I've never needed to use a magnifying glass to find the T for a rehouse, even when 1/8" or smaller.

The smaller they are, the easier they are to rehouse. You can't scoop out an 8" T necessarily.
I like to use the magnifier not for a rehousing but for placement of feeders near where I think the T will most likely visit during its travels. This is usually done when I first obtain a T since I don't know whether it is using the hide I provided or burrowing somewhere. I just got my marxi's last week.

The only T that scares me on a permanent escape is my one inch Tapinauchenius gigas. They sit near the top of the container, but won't budge if I tap the container or open the lid. I fear that it is lulling me into a stupor for the day it suddenly uses its speedy abilities.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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13,103
I like to use the magnifier not for a rehousing but for placement of feeders near where I think the T will most likely visit during its travels. This is usually done when I first obtain a T since I don't know whether it is using the hide I provided or burrowing somewhere. I just got my marxi's last week.

The only T that scares me on a permanent escape is my one inch Tapinauchenius gigas. They sit at the top of the container, but won't budge if I tap the container or open the lid. I fear that it is lulling me into a stupor for the day it suddenly uses its speedy abilities.
I put my small slings, in small vials that way I don't have to worry about placement of feeder.

You should be concerned re T. gigas's speed haha. You bought Greased Lightning with 8 Legs Jeff! They make all other Ts look slow! You need the bag transfer for that species for now IMO, or do something like Red Eunice! I don't even let my Avics get transferred if they are near container opening haha, let alone a Tapi!
 

Jeff23

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I put my small slings, in small vials that way I don't have to worry about placement of feeder.

You should be concerned re T. gigas's speed haha. You bought Greased Lightning with 8 Legs Jeff! They make all other Ts look slow! You need the bag transfer for that species for now IMO, or do something like Red Eunice! I don't even let my Avics get transferred if they are near container opening haha, let alone a Tapi!
Vials would be nice for my tiny T's and I wish I could use them. But I don't because I have to occasionally travel for short trips on my job. The 5.5 oz cups allow me to use a decent water dish and control moisture over a bigger area as needed.

I need to get myself set up with some transfer bags.

I read that tapi's are very fast and skittish, but mine just sit there and either act like they aren't scared (or perhaps they hope sitting still will make me not see it). One of mine molted during shipment to me so I left it in the shipment vial that I carefully placed inside a slightly larger deli cup with several dry cotton balls and one wet one. After a few days it was very active and moved out of the vial. I had a fun time getting it from that small deli cup to the target 32 oz deli cup. It wouldn't move with a nudge from a paint brush. I slowly removed the cotton balls and turned the small cup upside down inside the top of the larger cup and found after a time period that it had far more patience in staying put than me. I finally took a second 32 oz cup and taped it upside down to the top of the target deli cup so that no gap existed between them. The next morning it had moved into the target container so that I could finalize the move. I do know mine can move fast because I can't keep up with them when they go after crickets. I now look at these T's first on feeding. If any are near the opening they are delayed until later in the feeding process.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Vials would be nice for my tiny T's and I wish I could use them. But I don't because I have to occasionally travel for short trips on my job. The 5.5 oz cups allow me to use a decent water dish and control moisture over a bigger area as needed.

I need to get myself set up with some transfer bags.

I read that tapi's are very fast and skittish, but mine just sit there and either act like they aren't scared (or perhaps they hope sitting still will make me not see it). One of mine molted during shipment to me so I left it in the shipment vial that I carefully placed inside a slightly larger deli cup with several dry cotton balls and one wet one. After a few days it was very active and moved out of the vial. I had a fun time getting it from that small deli cup to the target 32 oz deli cup. It wouldn't move with a nudge from a paint brush. I slowly removed the cotton balls and turned the small cup upside down inside the top of the larger cup and found after a time period that it had far more patience in staying put than me. I finally took a second 32 oz cup and taped it upside down to the top of the target deli cup so that no gap existed between them. The next morning it had moved into the target container so that I could finalize the move. I do know mine can move fast because I can't keep up with them when they go after crickets. I now look at these T's first on feeding. If any are near the opening they are delayed until later in the feeding process.
It's very easy to get complacent w/Ts. Tapi's are widely regarded as the fastest Ts across OW and NW. I'd say all Ts have their own disposition, w/that said be careful. Iridopelma are faster than Avics, but every time I've owned one they ultimately show their true speed, despite most of the time moving on faster than a normal T while in their home.

That's the key IMO, people observe their pets in their containers where the animals feel safe. So they aren't hyped up, and the unwise keeper then makes that mistake and comes to the forum reporting an escape etc etc etc.

Short trips + vials can often lead to death for slings for many people. I love condiment cups !
 

Jeff23

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It's very easy to get complacent w/Ts. Tapi's are widely regarded as the fastest Ts across OW and NW. I'd say all Ts have their own disposition, w/that said be careful. Iridopelma are faster than Avics, but every time I've owned one they ultimately show their true speed, despite most of the time moving on faster than a normal T while in their home.

That's the key IMO, people observe their pets in their containers where the animals feel safe. So they aren't hyped up, and the unwise keeper then makes that mistake and comes to the forum reporting an escape etc etc etc.

Short trips + vials can often lead to death for slings for many people. I love condiment cups !
I didn't know they are regarding as the fastest among all T's. I knew they were for NW's though. I bring my T containers into the bathroom in sets with crickets already caught in vials for the feeding purpose. I place the enclosures one by one into a large plastic tub with a rolled up towel against the bathroom door. I also throw two smaller towels toward the nearest corners because I was told they will stop once they think they have gotten to a good hiding place.
 

viper69

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I also throw two smaller towels toward the nearest corners because I was told they will stop once they think they have gotten to a good hiding place.
This is generally true.
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
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Mar 2, 2014
Messages
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Very interesting I hadn't considered that. A friend of mine got the idea of using olive oil to prevent escapes. He got the idea from a thread here in the forum. Not sure where that thread is though.

You can't scoop out an 8" T necessarily.
Olive oil, for me, would be messy!!
Then once the rehouse is complete you'll need to clean off the oil. JMO, but hey, works for them. Right?

I used a shovel once!! Just kidding.

Agree, smaller seem to be easier, except H. sp. Columbia/Klein. Tiny, skittish speed demons!!
 

viper69

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Olive oil, for me, would be messy!!
Then once the rehouse is complete you'll need to clean off the oil. JMO, but hey, works for them. Right?

I used a shovel once!! Just kidding.

Agree, smaller seem to be easier, except H. sp. Columbia/Klein. Tiny, skittish speed demons!!
Yeah I didn't ask him about the clean up hahah good point.

I have the small variant, a MM too, man I wish I knew someone with a MF looking to breed. This guy wants to get out and breed big time.
 

Teal

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I use vials or straws (for little guys) when doing transfers. If I am worried about a crazy fast spider, I will use a fish net instead that covers the entire opening of their enclosure. Most of my Ts are defensive, though, and are easy to coax into vials for moving. I take it slow and easy... rushing never ends well when working with Ts.

As for escapees - The other night, my OBT female switched it up on me... instead of throwing a threat display, she bolted straight out of her jar, across the shelf top, and then onto the under side of it. Then it was just a matter of getting a catch cup over her.

I have had little slings bolt - T. gigas and OBT most recently - and I just try to redirect them to their homes. I prefer the little ones bolt up my arms, because then I at least know where they are for sure LOL
 
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