Ephebopus cyanognathus

AmberDawnDays

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My husband has expressed interest in this specific species. This is quite exciting for me because he doesn't have any spiders of his own yet. So far it's just been me doing the research, collecting Ts and of course I take care of all the husbandry. The deeper I get into this hobby, the more interest he is showing. He went to an expo with me last month. He is always willing to go to the pet stores with me. He also likes to watch me do any husbandry, although I haven't been able to get him to participate much with any husbandry, but he has helped a little if I need him to.

Anyways, since he has shown interest in a specific T, I would like to get some information about this species. I've read a little about them and have gathered that they need moist and deep substrate, they eat well, grow fast, and they are rather fast and skittish. Does this sum it up for them or is there more I should know?

My husband doesn't want a sling because they grow slowly. What is a good size to look for? How long do they live? What is the price range for this T for unsexed juvies or even an AF?

EDIT:
I edited the facts about the species care... just in case someone read this and ended up following the false information I had gathered on this species. Whats above should be correct info now. :)

Thanks :)
 
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Venom1080

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ive never kept them, but from what i read they grow quite fast. like most other tropicals. you could probably get a sling for around 30 bucks. lifespan, medium, 10+ years most like.
 

AmberDawnDays

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ive never kept them, but from what i read they grow quite fast. like most other tropicals. you could probably get a sling for around 30 bucks. lifespan, medium, 10+ years most like.
Great to know. :) I was reading a thread from like 2003 about them that went back and forth with some people saying they grew slow and some people saying the grew fast.
 

Venom1080

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Great to know. :) I was reading a thread from like 2003 about them that went back and forth with some people saying they grew slow and some people saying the grew fast.
those people were probably keeping it too cool. anything will grow slow than.
 

sdsnybny

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They are not slow growers by any means. My house is a minimum of 70-72 degrees in winter and up to 90 on very hot summer days (no AC) I raised two E. uatuman slings from 1/2" to adult/sub adult very quickly.
received on 09/18/15 @ 2i Molts; 10/19/15, 12/02/15, 01/18/16, 03/15/16, 05/13/16, 07/18/16, 10/27/16 MM ultimate molt 12/05/16
The other one is female and followed almost the exact molting scenario.
 

Sana

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I learned the hard way that this genus needs the sub at their burrow to be slightly moist. They dehydrate really easily and very quickly.
 

Kayis

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Steve @ arachnoiden has one up for sale about 2 inches or so sexed female for 50$. Slings usually go for around 30ish so yeah go pick it up ;). I have one that made a dirt curtain and has started playing jack in the box with me every time I pop open its deli cup and if that doesn't happen its running laps around(yeah definitely fast/skittish). Keep the sub slightly moist like Sana above has noted.
 
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Andrea82

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I got a female of this species a while a go. I set it up in a bigger/deeper enclosure than I would normally use so she can burrow away to her liking. I started a little burrow for her, added some fake leaves and branches for anchorpoints for webbing. I'm using moist cocofiber substrate which I have tamped down really well. I added springtails to deal with leftovers and mold, since this species does better on slightly higher than roomtemp and need moist substrate, which usually is a good recipe for mold and uglyness.
I created ample ventilation on the sides but only four holes in the lid.
Every other week I pour some water down the sides directly on the substrate, and I overflow the waterdish.
I think my female is 7cm DLS, and quite speedy when she wants to, but she is more shy than my E.murinus and rather hunkers down in stresspose.
It took her a week to settle in, but since then, she eats very well, and sits at the entrance, showing her legs and fangs.
I've read that they can become quite defensive when bigger. And they have urticating hairs on the pedipalps instead of on the abdomen, I'll try to find a video showing that in a minute.
Good choice but not for absolute beginners.

 

AmberDawnDays

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Are they considered not for beginners because of their need for humidity and because they are fast? I want a P. Irminia, but have decided to wait because I'm not to that level yet. Would you place ephebopus cyanognathus around the same level as the P. Irminia?

I know I am new to the hobby. I really enjoy this hobby and it's hard not to get ahead of myself. I don't want to end up with species beyond my skill level. It's definitely hard to know what is appropriate and what isn't. When will I know that I am ready for medium level species, if this is medium level? I feel like I can handle it because I'm built to handle stuff lol. I didnt know how to say that any better lmao. Anyways, I feel like I could do it, but I dont want a judgement error to create a huge problem for me or the T. I also typically learn by doing. I watch once, then I do it, if that makes sense at all.
@Andrea82
 

KezyGLA

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I wouldn't hesitate get a sling. It is probably the best color transition from spiderling to adult in the hobby.
 

Kayis

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Would you place ephebopus cyanognathus around the same level as the P. Irminia?
I wouldn't put an E. cyanognathus on the same level of a P. irminia. I'd probably put it on an intermediate level....just because it requires more care but that's it imo.
 

Andrea82

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Speed is the same as a P.irminia, in fact, from what i've seen so far, Ephebopus seems to be a burrowing version of Psalmopoeus.
Stubborn and not moving, and zipping away the next second. My P.irminia sling was much more defensive though. And in comparison to E.murinus, cyanognathus is less defensive and flighty. My murinus disappears at the slightest disturbance, the cyanognathus stays put and patiently waits for the mealworm to drop down in front of her.
I have no experience with adult P.irminia, or Ephebopus, but I do keep P.pulcher and juvi/slings of Ephebopus. I'm actually planning to get every species in the Ephebopus genus, I like them so much.
In terms of humidity...I don't find them hard thus far, especially with the springtails added. I keep the soil the colour of coffee, and this works well. If it dries out faster, you'll see the spider disappearing to lower levels.

If you don't mind speed, it could be a good addition. But take in consideration that the venom of this genus is worse than the average NW, worse than Psalmopoeus as well. And you have to be able to get basic husbandry of Theraphosidae right, because this species is more sensitive.
I wouldn't give it to your boyfriend as a first T.
I'd start with a large-ish sling as well like @KezyGLA says. Their colours are awesome!

This is my own thread when i got it:
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/e-cyanognathus-a-geniculata.289508/
it has a picture of my lady. :)
 
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Chris LXXIX

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I wouldn't put an E. cyanognathus on the same level of a P. irminia.
Not mentioning that the chances to spot/view the E.cyanognathus are higher than see a P.irminia :-s

They are both intermediate NW T's.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Are they considered not for beginners because of their need for humidity and because they are fast?
Ephebopus is a very, very fast genus. My E.murinus once performed a 40 cm "enclosure coast to coast" in a blink of an eye.
They are a bit on the nervous side (IMO nothing transcendental but I speak for me). Once they settle they spend most of their time in their burrows, at night I spot my baby legs out of the hole, waiting for a prey. Often she's completely out "sitting" on that like 'Conan the Barbarian' on his throne :p

Had a E.cyanognathus in the past, they are amazing. Mine was a bit more reclusive than her "skeletron" sis I have now, but means nothing :-s

Lots of inches of moist substrate is the key.
 

Andrea82

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My E.murinus is inverting her enclosure. First she dug down, but she's now adding so much substrate to the mouth of her burro, she actually webs it stuck to the lid!
So i have an enclosure with loads of substrate and a tower right smack in the middle.
I think my E.cyanognathus is building something similar.
Wholeheartedly agree on visibility of P.irminia to Ephebopus. I see both ladies for 60 percent sticking out of the mouth of their burrows almost every night. The E.murinus is venturing a bit further now, probably looking for more to web up. She moves branches and leaves as well and sticks them together with webbing. I love watching them :).
If they are out if their burrows, i just wait with feeding and maintenance until they are back in. Or i move the enclosure a little to get them back in.
 

cold blood

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Keep in mind, that properly housed, this is not a species you will see very often at all...very shy...and adults don't look as brightly colored either.
 

viper69

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@AmberDawnDays I've raised these before, great T, not a beginner species. There's also a user on here that JUST posted, raised a sling to AF, still alive at 10 yrs. PM her.

Some of your information is plain wrong.

I've read a little about them and have gathered that they need high humidity, deep substrate, they eat well, grow quite slowly, and they are rather fast and skittish. Does this sum it up for them or is there more I should know?

My husband doesn't want a sling because they grow slowly. What is a good size to look for? How long do they live? What is the price range for this T for unsexed juvies or even an AF?
1. High humidity- not true at all. I've always kept them a little bit more moist than say my scrubland species that prefer arid climates. I kept mine in somewhat moist sub in a container with holes drilled where the sub is located to provide increased ventilation to prevent mold, either from sub moisture or potential cricket parts.

2. Deep sub- YES, they will use it. They make very tight burrows depending upon the container. Tightly woven with silk unlike some other species.

3. FAST growers!!

4. VERY FAST and VERY SKITTISH
all things being equal, they are faster and more skittish than a GBB. If your GBB is not like most in that dept, then don't use that as a baseline comparison hah.

Are they considered not for beginners because of their need for humidity and because they are fast?
Due to speed, not a beginner. They are however easy to raise. They are very colorful in their own way. The blue setae will turn to violet as they age, esp in females.

Prices vary, but AFs typically range at about 150-200$

Also, you will rarely see it, it's pretty much a pet hole. You'll see the tips of its legs the most.

It is probably the best color transition from spiderling to adult in the hobby
Man, if I was your neighbor, I'd take any GBB and A. versicolor you owned just on principle for saying that :D. You think Blue Fangs, have a better pattern and color transition than a GBB? You may have to forfeit your collection....
 
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KezyGLA

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Man, if I was your neighbor, I'd take any GBB and A. versicolor you owned just on principle for saying that :D. You think Blue Fangs, have a better pattern and color transition than a GBB? You may have to forfeit your collection....
Yeah, yeah keep trying :p. But seriously it is one of the best ;)
 
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