Ephebopus cyanognathus - Blue fang

invertepet

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IMHO, the most incredible colors of any juvenile tarantula... I think they're awesome as adults, but as spiderlings! Wow.
 

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Raveness

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That is so beautiful :) I really plan to get one in the near future.
 

JacenBeers

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I have only seen a few pics of these as adults could you perhaps post a pic of one grown up? It truly is beautiful
 

Henry Kane

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ArrrggghhH! You torture me with this pic!

*going to update christmas list...

Atrax
 

Tarantula Lover

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Originally posted by invertepet
IMHO, the most incredible colors of any juvenile tarantula... I think they're awesome as adults, but as spiderlings! Wow.
Wow! Great Pic! i love the colors! never knew they were that color! Lets see an adult pic!!! Nice pic again,

James
 

Alex S.

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Ephebopus cyanognathus

Great pic. E. cyanognathus is such an awesome species.... my favorite.

Alex S.
 

Joy

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Isn't that amazing! I can see I need to expand my collection to include some Ephebopus.

Joy
 

invertepet

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Here she is - a big grown up. You can't see the purple-blue iridescence of her chelicerae too well with this angle, but it shows off the reddish-pinkish hairs and the awesome yellow leg banding (as if the bluefang aspect wasn't enough)...
 

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Joy

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Originally posted by invertepet
Here she is - a big grown up. You can't see the purple-blue iridescence of her chelicerae too well with this angle, but it shows off the reddish-pinkish hairs and the awesome yellow leg banding (as if the bluefang aspect wasn't enough)...
That really IS awesome. What kind of a set-up do you use for these?

Joy
 

AlbinoDragon829

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I bet adults of this species go for an arm and a leg.. I mean, I know they're uncommon, but $75 I've seen someplaces for a 1/4" sling?

How big is the one in your pic?
 

invertepet

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About 4.5" -- Both uatuman and cyanognathus are somewhat mid to small-bodied tarantulas. They have 'cute' very round little abdomens (the pic specimen looks more oval, but in reality it was kind of round - almost like a mini T.blondi abdomen).

They like it hot and very damp. The pictured spider tore up all the moss you see and constructed a volcano-esque cone which led down under the substrate! Really fun spiders, but a little secretive. I suggest a setup like those recently posted (a month or so back, I think) for obligate burrowers, so you can 'check' yours from time to time.

Yes, they're pricy: $60-75 for slings, $250-ish for adults.

bill
 

atavuss

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how are their temperments, Bill......skittish? defensive?
Ed
 
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LaRiz

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Nice pics Invertepet!

When the blue fanged Ephebopus first hit the US hobby, of course, I bought a bunch. These spiderlings had a pinkish/metallic greenish prosoma. This was late '99/early '00. Then, they were offered as E. uatuman. Later to be called E. cyanognathus.
This year, some spiderlings were imported from Europe, and perhaps even Canada (Jeremy Huff, I believe had a litter). These spiderlings had one difference that the '00 bunch had. They had jet black prosomas.
Both had bright metallic blue chelicera, and both had the same general coloration. other than the prosoma. One has a black cephalothorax, the other having the pinkish greenish.
Which is which? or could they be another Ephebopid? Any thoughts would be appreciated.
There could be a hybrid disaster is somebody accidentally breeds them.
A female I had was offered a male, but refused time and time again. So I sent him off, where he did not breed and eventually died. This male was another that had the pinkish/greenish prosoma as a spiderling.
john
 

invertepet

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My understanding is that uatuman juveniles do also have blue chelicerae, but I might be wrong about that. --- Which could explain the black vs. pink prosoma -- the blacks could've been premature uatuman. The spiders ARE very very similar in all other respects.

b
 

hooale

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John,

>This year, some spiderlings were imported from Europe, and >perhaps even Canada (Jeremy Huff, I believe had a litter). >These spiderlings had one difference that the '00 bunch had. >They had jet black prosomas.

As far as I know cyanognathus has as spiderling a black cephalothorax. In '97 i got my first 7 spiderlings; a wc female dropped an eggsack. All the spiderlings i bought in the last years also had black cephalothorax.

You are the first one mentioning this. Are you sure you are not compairing juvs with babies? Both look quite different. Or perhaps it was uatuman?

I have at the moment cyanognathus from spiderling till adult male/female. I will try to get some pics of the different sizes. So that people can see the differences.

>A female I had was offered a male, but refused time and time >again. So I sent him off, where he did not breed and eventually >died. This male was another that had the pinkish/greenish >prosoma as a spiderling.
Strange, very strange! In the 30 or so matings i upserved, both specimens were always very willing.

Alex
 

dilleo

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Maybe a hybrid emerged that was able to reproduce.

-Jeremy
 

Mister Internet

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Originally posted by dilleo
Maybe a hybrid emerged that was able to reproduce.

-Jeremy
I thought hyrids were sterile by definition? Of course, I barely remember what a Punnett Square is, so I'm not the world's foremost authority on genetics or anything... ;) If there is such a thing as a fertile hybrid, I'm interested to hear the difference...
 

LaRiz

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Originally posted by hooale

You are the first one mentioning this. Are you sure you are not compairing juvs with babies? Both look quite different. Or perhaps it was uatuman?
Strange, very strange! In the 30 or so matings i upserved, both specimens were always very willing.
Alex
hooale,
Attention to detail :D That's the story of my life. I was not comparing juvies to spiderlings. What I was getting at was that one may be E. uatuman and the other, E. cyanognathus. What are the taxonomic differences between the two. Remember coloration is poor choice in characterising tarantulas.
Your 30 or so matings were all E. cyanognathus? It is my opinion that all paired tarantulas have totally different courtships. To cite examples, last night I paired up A. avicularia. Courtship was barely noticeable in male, he gently tapped. Mating was very long, the longest I've seen. They were locked a good 4 minutes. Last year, I twice bred Cyriopagopus thorelli (pettrade name). Courtship was average, but the male was slappin' the female. Mating was extremely brief. Less than 5 seconds. Both matings produced eggsacs.
With Haplopelma schmidti, there was no visual courtship. After sitting apart from each other, male and female advanced toward each other and mated. Last night, I also paired up Poecilotheria rufilata. Male tapped loudly, but the female was not interested. At least when I was watching over them. Today, I check on them and they are together on the same cork slab. And she's my "widowmaker". He's lucky he survived the night. She's either sick or likes this male :) I've had another P. rufilata after mating, lived contently with each other for about a month after.
Well, I'm off track!
If these two species did manage to breed (talking Ephebopus), and offspring is hatched, when the offspring mature and reproduce (if so), there would be a subspecies status given. Correct?
The point of my original post was to make aware hobbyists aware that there are two "blue fangs" out there in the hobby. Why would one have the pinkish/green ceph, and the other jet-black? The pinkish greens being the first ones to hit the states. I think is worth looking into.
 
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