Enclosure size vs. growth rate

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
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Jan 31, 2010
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Has there been any study on this? With temp, humidity, and feeding equal for all spiders, will enclosure size make a difference? Would a sling in a deli cup molt less than one in a larger container? Will a T hold off on molting if it doesn't have enough room or will it go ahead and attempt the molt?

I am just wanting to know if any research has been done on this topic. Any info is appreciated.

Thanks
 

bobusboy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
287
Has there been any study on this? With temp, humidity, and feeding equal for all spiders, will enclosure size make a difference? Would a sling in a deli cup molt less than one in a larger container? Will a T hold off on molting if it doesn't have enough room or will it go ahead and attempt the molt?

I am just wanting to know if any research has been done on this topic. Any info is appreciated.

Thanks

I think this was disproved, at least with snakes it was. And my slings are moulting constantly regardless of the size of the container they're in.

As for scientific evidence i will see what i can find.
 

bholmes

Arachnosquire
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Sep 2, 2009
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I remember reading about ts getting stuck in hides while molting, or not having enough room to stretch and having bent legs. So based on that I would have to say they will not hold off molting if they container is too small.
 

killy

Arachnoknight
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May 20, 2009
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I don't know about any specific studies on T size as a function of enclosure size, but all of the research I've done in this hobby indicates that tarantulas feel quite insecure and vulnerable in enclosures that are too big (I think the rule of thumb is 3 x length/ 1.5 x width). As a layman I would conclude that, psychologically speaking, Ts would be in a healthier frame of mind in the smaller enclosures, and would thus emerge from heathier, more stress-free molts and exhibit more robust growth rates. :D

On the other hand, who's comfortable changing clothes in a closet? Maybe the Goldilocks principle would be the way to go: an enclosure that's not too big, not too small, but j-u-u-u-st right!
 
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jeryst

Arachnopeon
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Mar 10, 2010
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I dont believe T's can "hold off" molting any more than you can hold off growing older. Its a bodily function for them. Eat, grow, molt. Pretty simple. If they do one and two, they gotta do number 3.

If space is a factor in growth, it is a survival mechanism. For example, fresh water fish have this mechanism. Keep a goldfish in a bowl, it stays small. Put it in a pond, it grows big. This is a survival mechanism because bodies of fresh water tend to grow and shrink. Its suicide for a small fish to keep growing when it is living in a small pool of water. Saltwater fish, on the other hand, do not have this mechanism, since the ocean doesnt dry up. T's dont need a lot of room. I read somewhere that most of them dont venture more than a foot or two from their burrow for their entire lives, unless something drives them away, or they are interested in mating, etc. Plus, they live outside, just like people, dogs, cats, etc. There is no chance of the "outside" shrinking, so tank size should make no difference.
 

RottweilExpress

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Apr 3, 2006
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I dont believe T's can "hold off" molting any more than you can hold off growing older. Its a bodily function for them. Eat, grow, molt. Pretty simple. If they do one and two, they gotta do number 3.
Disagreed. I belive stress can prolong the period between molts.
 

jimip

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 26, 2010
Messages
103
I dont believe T's can "hold off" molting any more than you can hold off growing older. Its a bodily function for them. Eat, grow, molt. Pretty simple. If they do one and two, they gotta do number 3.

If space is a factor in growth, it is a survival mechanism. For example, fresh water fish have this mechanism. Keep a goldfish in a bowl, it stays small. Put it in a pond, it grows big. This is a survival mechanism because bodies of fresh water tend to grow and shrink. Its suicide for a small fish to keep growing when it is living in a small pool of water. Saltwater fish, on the other hand, do not have this mechanism, since the ocean doesnt dry up. T's dont need a lot of room. I read somewhere that most of them dont venture more than a foot or two from their burrow for their entire lives, unless something drives them away, or they are interested in mating, etc. Plus, they live outside, just like people, dogs, cats, etc. There is no chance of the "outside" shrinking, so tank size should make no difference.
the gold fish thing is a myth, depending on the gold fish you need a certain sized tank for the samller species you need a 30 gallon tank cold and water. the "ablity" to stop growing is called stunting and can disfigure or even kill your fish they dont stop growing thats why i have a 4 foot tiger shovel nose in a 6 foot tank on his way to shed aquarium next week. its the same thing as leaving the sling in the deli cup, except the deli cup is his body.
 
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