EcoEarth...

Rob1985

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I tried searching, but I recently got back int he hobby after the "ex" and I parted ways. I used to use peat moss, but wanted to try the ecoearth stuff this time around. So to prevent all the baking and what not I used a half the amount of water recommended, but the ecoearth is still damp. I put lots of holes for cross ventilation, including down low on the side of the containers. I read about baking it (war stories) and then microwaving as well.

Now my legit question, will this stuff eventually dry out or did I just have a brain fart? :?

In the end, tonight I am still picking up a bag of organic peat anyhow.

Anyone who has more experience with this stuff PM me.
 

shanebp

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Brainfart, evaporation ftw. It'll dry out, just give it some time.
 

Rob1985

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Brainfart, evaporation ftw. It'll dry out, just give it some time.
yeah... :wall:

I mean it's damp and I made it only damp for this reason. I think I am still going to take the 4 other prepared ziplock containers and put a screen in the top after work tonight, bake the substrate a bit and get it done that way. Then transfer, again.
:wall:
 

Wadew

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The best substrate IMO is black earth. Unbaked still alive with all the organisms in it, just under the leaf litter in the woods where there are no lawn chemicals. Spiders have been using this as substrate for millions of years without any harm. It is only here where people have created this paranoia about using natural elements in the enclosure.

Try it ! You might just have success!
Cheers Wade
 

Fran

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The best substrate IMO is black earth. Unbaked still alive with all the organisms in it, just under the leaf litter in the woods where there are no lawn chemicals. Spiders have been using this as substrate for millions of years without any harm. It is only here where people have created this paranoia about using natural elements in the enclosure.

Try it ! You might just have success!
Cheers Wade
Is not the same. Life in the wild has nothing to do with life in captivity.
So you want to prevent as much harm as possible.
 

Wadew

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Is not the same. Life in the wild has nothing to do with life in captivity.
So you want to prevent as much harm as possible.
What kind of harm are you preventing? If living dirt has that much harm in it I doubt the planet would have been able to evolve at all.

Wade
 

Fran

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What kind of harm are you preventing? If living dirt has that much harm in it I doubt the planet would have been able to evolve at all.

Wade
...
"living dirt" on an encloure , where air is semi stagned, with humidity, will be the perfect ecuation for unwanted bacteria, mites and parasites that will be detrimental for the tarantula.


Life in the wild is absolutely different than life on an enclosure. And even if tarantulas have to fight way more harrsh envirments and dangers in the wild, Im guessing you dont want to provide those yourself.
 

Rue

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If you take dirt/earth from the backyard...and isolate it (all the while keeping it humid and warm)...you have the potential to grow any 'bad' organisms (bacteria, molds, fungi, etc) that might well be in that bit of soil without the benefit of naturally occuring checks that would be present in the wild...

Odds are that you will okay...but you might not be. Odds are much better, safety-wise, if you start with something cleaner.

BTW: I broke off enough of my rock-like brick of Plantation Soil to soak and fill my little rearing cubes...man...was that ever a pain.

I had also purchased a bag of seedling starter (organic, has peat in it, vermiculite, I think perlite) to start up some heritage tomato plants...so much easier to use (and cheaper)...I'm thinking maybe that's what I'll use for the T's down the road...I'll just double check to make sure it's indeed safe...
 
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Wadew

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...
"living dirt" on an encloure , where air is semi stagned, with humidity, will be the perfect ecuation for unwanted bacteria, mites and parasites that will be detrimental for the tarantula.


Life in the wild is absolutely different than life on an enclosure. And even if tarantulas have to fight way more harrsh envirments and dangers in the wild, Im guessing you dont want to provide those yourself.
Live earth actually has beneficial organisms in it to naturally deal with mold or fungus. I have been using it for years now and have not found it to cause any ill effect what so ever. I would also state that I will freshen up each enclosure by either dumping it and completely cleaning it or top dressing with a little digging and scraping then replacing the top layer at least a couple of time's a year.
 

Rob1985

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Look what I provoked lol

That ecoearth stuff is a pain... I bought a bag if peat this mornin at lowes on my way to work. I am think about a mix. Anyone ever mixed the two?

I always used peat in the past
 

Scoolman

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Look what I provoked lol

That ecoearth stuff is a pain... I bought a bag if peat this mornin at lowes on my way to work. I am think about a mix. Anyone ever mixed the two?

I always used peat in the past
I mix them with great success. I use 2-3 parts eco to 1 part peat. The peat holds moisture and the fibers on the eco make for stable burrows.
 

Rob1985

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Really? I love the stuff. It's all I use for all of my enclosures.
I guess it's the part where it's wet that annoys me lol.

I was soo used to just popping peat into the oven for a little bit and then done.


I will have to give mixing them a try as I have an entire rubbermaid container full of this stuff. haha!


fyi, the C.ritae packs pretty impressive threat posture and bite when annoyed, found that out when transferring.
 

Protectyaaaneck

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I guess it's the part where it's wet that annoys me lol.

I was soo used to just popping peat into the oven for a little bit and then done.


I will have to give mixing them a try as I have an entire rubbermaid container full of this stuff. haha!


fyi, the C.ritae packs pretty impressive threat posture and bite when annoyed, found that out when transferring.


I don't know about you, but the process seems pretty easy to me. Get a large conainter for hot water, add a brick of coco fiber, let it grow, then disperse it amongst the enclosures. If you're making it correctly, the coco should be damp but not sopping wet. If you have decent ventilation, the coco will dry out within a few weeks, depending on how deep you made it.
 

Rob1985

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I don't know about you, but the process seems pretty easy to me. Get a large conainter for hot water, add a brick of coco fiber, let it grow, then disperse it amongst the enclosures. If you're making it correctly, the coco should be damp but not sopping wet. If you have decent ventilation, the coco will dry out within a few weeks, depending on how deep you made it.
I used half the amount of water so it would be just damp and not sopping wet, so I am good there, but I may be over analyzing it. I have plenty of ventilation. After work I am going to hit my work shop, cut a 2" hole and screen the lid to help a bit more.

Thanks for the insight though as this was my first venture with it.
 

Protectyaaaneck

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I used half the amount of water so it would be just damp and not sopping wet, so I am good there, but I may be over analyzing it. I have plenty of ventilation. After work I am going to hit my work shop, cut a 2" hole and screen the lid to help a bit more.

Thanks for the insight though as this was my first venture with it.
Cool, well good luck with it. I'm sure you'll find that it's not so bad. :)
 

The Spider Faery

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If you're not using all of the Eco Earth you made and you're doing a smaller container, just grab handfuls of the stuff and squeeze out any excess water.
 

Rob1985

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If you're not using all of the Eco Earth you made and you're doing a smaller container, just grab handfuls of the stuff and squeeze out any excess water.
I thought about that last night... I can't even squeeze anything out. So I assume it's normal, for those of you who use it, for it to be a bit damp still when it goes in.
 

The Spider Faery

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I thought about that last night... I can't even squeeze anything out. So I assume it's normal, for those of you who use it, for it to be a bit damp still when it goes in.
Yes that's one of the benefits of Eco Earth in that it holds moisture, and especially helpful for some species that need more humidity. Your C. ritae would be good with this.
 
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