E. tergestinus

alkarlosse

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
17
Now, I encountered a scorpion two days ago, during a trip, and I decided to capture it in order to save it from the fearsome faces of some female friends who demanded the demon to be thrown into the fire!

So, after browsing several sites and looking at pictures (countless of
them) I've come into the conclusion that this species must be
"Euscorpius tergestinus". Photos and characteristics match the live
sample in front of me, so that should be the species.

I currently keep it in a plastic box with a moistured cloth placed
inside (in case it needs to drink water) and a rolled paper for it to
crawl in, if it feels like it :p (and it actually did, last night)

So I was wondering if someone could help (even if not for this species
specifically) with what I should feed it and how the habitat should
be.

Searching the forum didn't yield any specific answers to my questions and I only have read about other species and how to keep them. So I'd love some info.

PS.: This is my first scorpion attempt. I'm a jumping-spider-freak :p
 

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
Hi Alkarlosse, I will try and help. I currently keep 4 E.tergestinus (1.3) from Corsica. I keep them separately in small plastic containers at just above room temperature, currently 21 degrees. They are in a rack with a heat cable zig zagged along the back. The substrate is peat rich potting soil with a simple cork bark hide in each.
I feed them once a week with a cricket roughly 1/2 the size of the scorpion body but have recently moved over to laterius roaches as an experiment. I moisten one end of the container with a sprayer about once a week and this seems to be fine. Under these conditions they are out most evenings having a wander.
Some suggest a cool down over winter months as in there natural, temperate cliamates and whilst I have no doubts that this would be fine...Im not really doing it. The temp does of course drop a good few degrees at night anyway.

I think they're great little things and 2 of my females are hopefully gravid. As George (our recently departed member) told me, their birthing date seems to be quite seaonal and they do so in October usually...at least for him.

That's about it...good luck!!

Charlie


One of my females..
 

alkarlosse

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
17
Thank you very much for the advice. I thought that I wouldn't have problems with the temperature, since it's a native species so room temp should be okay and I will try the wires as well.

They don't burrow, do they? I mean I won't need several centimeters of substrate, right?

A while ago it was bathing its pincers and front legs, so I guess that's a sign of its well being (as it was with my spiders). Now it's hiding in the paper so I'll take a picture of it once it comes out and post it here.

Thanks again and good luck with the females and the, hopefully, lots of babies.
 

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
Ive never seen mine burrowing and I give them about 2cm of soil. They seem happy just with the cover of the bark and they are often upside down on it when I lift it up to take a look. Mine drink by touching their chela (pincers) on water droplets on the side of the tub. The water tension makes the droplets 'stick' and they then transfer it to their mouthparts. Neat.
 

alkarlosse

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
17
Hmmmm, I have its new home set up :D
And it's name "Crixie" :)

I will give it a day to settle and explore a bit and will feed it a cricket tomorrow.

Now, there is something I noticed: it hides when in light. I mean, I thought I should place it near sunlight in case it needs that for its metabolism. Yet, it seems it dislikes it. Whenever it's in the dark or under lamp light, it's active, and when it's under sunlight (not direct) it hides in the bark.

Any ideas?
 

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
Well, I imagine most Euscorps spend the vast majority of the time completely concealed under logs, rocks and leaf litter during the day, rarely (if ever) being exposed to direct sunlight. I certainly wouldn't worry about them not getting any. They're not like a lot of reptiles that require certain ultra violet wavelengths to manufacture vitamins like D3.
Your scorp porbably scurried off as it felt exposed and vulnerable, having detected the natural light.
Looking forward to seeing the little guy..:)

Ps. My profile pic is one of my other females...
 

alkarlosse

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
17
Well, it is stressed out and earlier today it caught its first crickey :) Yummieee!

I didn't witness the kill though (since it was somewhat afraid at the start and I decided to leave it alone), but there is always a next time. Watching little palps munching on the dinner was quite a view itself.

But I've got a question; about 6h after I left it munching its prey, I come home and here it is, still holding the cricket but having eaten little more than its head. No movement. I notice a few minutes later that he is still taking bites of the poor cricket. I wonder, is it such a slow eater or is there some problem with it?

PS.: Maybe it's just enjoying every bite? Or want to keep some in the fridge? ;b
PS2.: I hope to have some clear photos of Crixie very soon.
 

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
Alkarlosse, Im glad your new scorp has settled in and is eating! Dont worry that he is being slow...this is perfectly normal. I remember being suprised myslef at how long it took for them to process food but then they are very small :)
I think he'll be just fine so try not to worry. When I 1st had my Euscorps I was constantly trying to observe them kill and eat prey but now I just leave them to eat and when I back there is simply nothing left.

Good luck and post some pics!!:D

Charlie
 

Vermis

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2005
Messages
191
Nice scorp! And nice find. :) I have two young E. flavicaudis at the moment, but I hope to keep more Euscorpius - and other small, inoffensive -species sometime. Like E. tergestinus. ;) Trouble is, small and inoffensive doesn't make a big impact on dealer's lists.
 

alkarlosse

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
17
Forgot to post, I noticed while it was taking bites of the meal, that it moved its pincers in a strange motive, like up and down but not quite like it.

Like the cricket was a 3kg and it was taking some weight exercise ;b (but that was certainly not the case).

My point: it seems it will be a hell lot of fun living with this little creature, which apparently is not just 'not-offensive', but actually agoraphobic and an expert at playing dead.

Thanks for all the advice again.

PS.: It abandoned a bit of the cricket but I guess that's perfectly natural. And with that I will stop harassing you with newbie questions :)
 

Nikos

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 30, 2002
Messages
1,224
where was the scorpion collected?
If it was near THessaloniki I highly doubt it being an E.tergestinus
 
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