Dumb government

Brettus

Arachnoknight
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In Australia, our government, in its infinite wisdom, has decided its ok to import dogs and cats (along with the diseases they carry) but not exotic T's. I've been in the hobby half a year now. Aussie T's are great, but they are burrowers and have an aggressive reputation. I'm really interested in expanding my collection and having some docile NW's. Does anyone know anyone in Australia that captive breeds exotic species?
 

Rydog

Arachnobaron
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I used to live there and it was really stupid how their import laws are. I'm sorry but I don't know anyonewho captive breeds NW's.
 

Nitibus

Arachnodemon
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I'll trade you for a dingo !

Kidding aside, You guys have many of the most unique creatures on this planet. I can't blame your government from preventing imported creatures to protect them...

Come to Canada with our crappy winters and our socialist police state :(
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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I bet in hindsight your country wishes they had brought in T's instead of Toads. {D
 

Brettus

Arachnoknight
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I bet in hindsight your country wishes they had brought in T's instead of Toads.
Aussie T's are ferocious hunters-one was recently documented actually eating one of those horrible cane toads. They are actually one of the few animals that preys upon them.

In seriousness though, I don't understand it-what possible harm could a foreign T pose in Australia. I couldn't think of any disease problem, and I doubt they would survive in our climate if they escaped.
 

Drachenjager

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Aussie T's are ferocious hunters-one was recently documented actually eating one of those horrible cane toads. They are actually one of the few animals that preys upon them.

In seriousness though, I don't understand it-what possible harm could a foreign T pose in Australia. I couldn't think of any disease problem, and I doubt they would survive in our climate if they escaped.
well if you have Ts there obviously they can survive there. I would bet that A. hentzi would do well there. They seem to to just fine in a lot of differant climates. as long as there arent too many of those pesky human things ruining the habitats
 

Talkenlate04

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In seriousness though, I don't understand it-what possible harm could a foreign T pose in Australia. I couldn't think of any disease problem, and I doubt they would survive in our climate if they escaped.
I do get the reasoning behind why they have it that way, but I think they should keep their minds open to maybe changing the law once more is known.
But Ts can bring in foreign mites or internal parasites. So they have a point to a point, if that makes any sense.
In ways I think its better to be to strong with the laws then to weak. Think about if they had had some foresight to the whole toad deal, they could have prevented where they are now if they had taken a while to think instead of just acting.
But what's done is done.
Maybe you can work on providing educational information to your wildlife agencies and maybe gain some support for a change. It's a long shot, but if it gets you riled enough why not try so you can say you did?
 

Brettus

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Weren't foreign mice or rats also introduced there to disastrous results ?
Yeah, mice can form plagues when there is lots of rain and then sun-the resultant increase in food causes their numbers to explode. Lots of foreign species have screwed our habitats up-rabbits are probably the worst. I can see the sense in trying to protect our unique habitats, I just couldn't see how the threat of an escaped B.smithi justifies not being allowed to import them at all.
 

syndicate

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In seriousness though, I don't understand it-what possible harm could a foreign T pose in Australia. I couldn't think of any disease problem, and I doubt they would survive in our climate if they escaped.
it could cause alot of problems.it could even put some of the native species in jeopardy if new ones took root in some areas.you guys have some beautiful species there tho.
 

Talkenlate04

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Yeah, mice can form plagues when there is lots of rain and then sun-the resultant increase in food causes their numbers to explode. Lots of foreign species have screwed our habitats up-rabbits are probably the worst. I can see the sense in trying to protect our unique habitats, I just couldn't see how the threat of an escaped B.smithi justifies not being allowed to import them at all.
Well, your government is strict as is with importing anything, and a Smithi being on the CITIES list would be an act of god to get into or out of your country.
Why they are so strict, heck I don’t know but imagine it is partly backlash from a few decades of messing up a bit with your natural wildlife.
 

Brettus

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you guys have some beautiful species there tho.
Oh, I'm not denying that. Aussie T's are the bomb, no doubt. The way they hunt, their colours, their attitude, they are really interesting-not to mention their stridulation-we call them "barking" spiders here. It's just it would be nice to have a big, docile NW in the collection as well.
 

Rydog

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Australia is one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet. Any introduced species will affect the ecosystem in one way or another, usually for the worse. I think that the Australian gov't thinks that by letting dogs be imported the idea is that they are going to be around humans for the most part and not become ferrel. But IMO T's won't really do that much damage, I mean what T has done damage in the US?
 

Brettus

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Maybe you can work on providing educational information to your wildlife agencies and maybe gain some support for a change. It's a long shot, but if it gets you riled enough why not try so you can say you did?
Good point. I've already been in contact with the Quarantine Department, and I think it really is time for a re-think. Keeping T's is a growing hobby in Australia, and I see no reason why carefully controlled importing of foreign species couldn't give the hobby a real kick. The problem here I think is that a lot of people get these spiders on a whim, and they look at your NW tarantulas and think they are the same. The reality is, if you are not careful, an Aussie T is a lot more likely to bite you, and the venom is quite potent.
 

syndicate

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i hear ya man.it would be strange only keeping species from the usa hehe
dunno what id do without all my poecs and haplopelmas
 

Brettus

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But IMO T's won't really do that much damage, I mean what T has done damage in the US?
I agree. A rabbit that can give birth to a host of new rabbits and digs burrows everywhere that destroys the ground is one thing, but an escape T? They live their lives most often in the confines of a burrow, and their ability to impact on the ecosystem would, you would think, be limited to the few square metres of ground they inhabit.
 

dragonblade71

Arachnobaron
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"it could cause alot of problems.it could even put some of the native species in jeopardy if new ones took root in some areas."

Yes, they could cause some unforseen problems that we wouldn't expect. Though I'm not sure about New World tarantulas making an impact on the native population. For one thing, Australian Ts tend to be more aggressive and have more potent venom so I would think that they would more or less be victorious in any clashes that would ensue. But that's just speculating.
 

Rydog

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scenario: A gravid female breaks loose from her confines gives birth, the babies take root in the ecosystem and push other species out and maybe bring new ones in. But for this to happen it would have to be a T like an OBT that could thrive there. A perfect example of this is the B. vagans that are taking up residence in Florida, one would have to study things such as these to see what it does to the environment. I think dogs are worse on the environment than T's I mean my dog alone has depleted a once thriving population of rabbits on my land. I think that if everyone was responsible and trustworthy then the Australian gov't wouldn't have a problem.
 

pinkfoot

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I bet in hindsight your country wishes they had brought in T's instead of Toads. {D
...or rabbits! {D

In South Africa we are faced with a similar problem, but there are breeders here who have exotic tarantulas, and there MUST be some in Oz. Check pet shops, reptile groups, small zoos, etc.
 
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