Drainage system for live plants.

Arachnomaniac1990

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2020
Messages
28
Hello all,

Recently I've been looking into live plants to put in my Lasiodora parahybana's enclosure when she's full grown.
I read the Photos sp of plant do well in less light then your average plant.
But I'm kinda new to the live plant keeping so any suggestions as to other plants that might do well, fire away.
Also, what do you use as drainage system, if you utilize it at all.
Thanks for any tips or suggestions.
 

Spaceman

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2019
Messages
122
Layer of clay balls at the bottom(not much) then add mesh to separate from sub.. The Dark Den on yt does that and it seem to work well
 

Arachnomaniac1990

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2020
Messages
28
Layer of clay balls at the bottom(not much) then add mesh to separate from sub.. The Dark Den on yt does that and it seem to work well
Yeah I have noticed that petco does that.
But as of now my Lp burrows quite a bit as a juvinile, that will stop I think when she's matured.
But if she burrows doesn't the mesh cause problems?
 

Spaceman

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2019
Messages
122
Yeah I have noticed that petco does that.
But as of now my Lp burrows quite a bit as a juvinile, that will stop I think when she's matured.
But if she burrows doesn't the mesh cause problems?
I don’t doubt they won’t rip it..
Perhaps if they realist there’s just glass under the balls they won’t excavate it - depends on the T’s personality
 

Feral

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2019
Messages
408
First, make sure you have your T husbandry rock solid before you go adding on new challenges. But if you're already solid, I'm a big proponent of the benefits of planted tanks. Plus, also totally fun and pretty! Yay!

I personally don't like using a false bottom over the entire enclosure footprint with terrestrial/fossorial inverts. Seems like it's begging for at least an eyesore, if not a headache, if not actual trouble. To avoid that, I have used two different methods- 1) using a closed-bottom container as a plant pot in which I create a mini false bottom, add charcoal and dividing mesh, add amended substrate, plant, then bury in whatever normal substrate I'm using in the enclosure or 2) amending the substrate if the entire enclosure (I use a modified ABG recipe) then planting with no false bottom at all. Method 1 has worked well for me. Method 2 is still in the testing phase. (I'm in the fifth month of testing and so far so good, but it's still too early to say it can work long term.)

I would use Pothos/Epipremnum sp. for your first planted T enclosure. There are quite a few varieties. See how it goes, experiment, see what works for you. Save the harder stuff for down the line. Epipremnum sp. can do well in just good ambient light (but no direct sunlight!), so no need for artificial light if you choose your location well. Most other plants would require some artificial light... and then that's a whole thing. Think/research about your substrate and/or fert choices. I can give opinions, if you want. Plan for how you're going to minimize risk of introducing contaminants/toxins from plants. (I like propagating washed cuttings in water from my own plants, no dirt/"cides"/plants of unknown history/etc. involved, very low risk.) Plan to have the tank planted (and with whatever "bioactive" seeding or detrivores your going to do) and let it sit for a couple of months, at least, before adding the T. Among other things, this will give time to get a healthy root system going to help protect it from... um, 'overzealous interior decorators'. lol

I'm happy to answer questions, as I'm sure others are. I love planted enclosure builds, so much fun!
 

Dorifto

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Messages
110
I don't use clay balls in my planted enclosures, instead I use first layer of a mix of sand, clay and top soil, then I add more substrate. I used the clay balls in my previous setup, but my pulchra ripped the mesh twice and took out the clay balls...

The sand and clay mix act like the clay balls, but in a miniaturized manner, and looks more natural. IMG_20200131_230856.jpg IMG_20200128_103134.jpg IMG_20200128_103747.jpg
 
Last edited:

Arachnomaniac1990

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2020
Messages
28
First, make sure you have your T husbandry rock solid before you go adding on new challenges. But if you're already solid, I'm a big proponent of the benefits of planted tanks. Plus, also totally fun and pretty! Yay!

I personally don't like using a false bottom over the entire enclosure footprint with terrestrial/fossorial inverts. Seems like it's begging for at least an eyesore, if not a headache, if not actual trouble. To avoid that, I have used two different methods- 1) using a closed-bottom container as a plant pot in which I create a mini false bottom, add charcoal and dividing mesh, add amended substrate, plant, then bury in whatever normal substrate I'm using in the enclosure or 2) amending the substrate if the entire enclosure (I use a modified ABG recipe) then planting with no false bottom at all. Method 1 has worked well for me. Method 2 is still in the testing phase. (I'm in the fifth month of testing and so far so good, but it's still too early to say it can work long term.)

I would use Pothos/Epipremnum sp. for your first planted T enclosure. There are quite a few varieties. See how it goes, experiment, see what works for you. Save the harder stuff for down the line. Epipremnum sp. can do well in just good ambient light (but no direct sunlight!), so no need for artificial light if you choose your location well. Most other plants would require some artificial light... and then that's a whole thing. Think/research about your substrate and/or fert choices. I can give opinions, if you want. Plan for how you're going to minimize risk of introducing contaminants/toxins from plants. (I like propagating washed cuttings in water from my own plants, no dirt/"cides"/plants of unknown history/etc. involved, very low risk.) Plan to have the tank planted (and with whatever "bioactive" seeding or detrivores your going to do) and let it sit for a couple of months, at least, before adding the T. Among other things, this will give time to get a healthy root system going to help protect it from... um, 'overzealous interior decorators'. lol

I'm happy to answer questions, as I'm sure others are. I love planted enclosure builds, so much fun!
Hey thanks, that was a lot of info.
I will give it some more thought though, maybe try it a year down the line if she goes in her final enclosure.
But thanks so much for the really comprehensive advice.
 
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