Dorcus?

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
Staff member
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
3,346
I thought I had it IDed but lost it...thought it rather on the small side for Dorcus:




 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
Staff member
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Oct 20, 2008
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3,346
Thank you, for some reason I skimmed right past Platycerus. Cool, WA didn't previously have a record for this genus in bugguide.
 

loxoscelesfear

Arachnoprince
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Feb 13, 2006
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1,056
zonbonzovi thought it rather on the small side for Dorcus:

there are small species of Dorcus. They can be quite abundant in rotting logs. Not a bad guess on your part. I think BeetleExperienc has this one nailed though.
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Good lord, look at the schlong on that thing! Did they ever produce any young'ns for you?
 

Tremors

Arachnopeon
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Oct 30, 2010
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I know nothing of your beetle but I have come across in my life several women from the South who were named Dorcus.

FYI:D
 

Bugs In Cyberspace

Arachnodemon
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Joined
Dec 10, 2006
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721
Wow, we may have a contender for the most off-topic reply ever made to a post while still using the sole word in the post's title! Still, I can't help but find the possibility that some Southern women have this name, very intriguing (and disturbing). I'm thinking big, rough hands.

Anyway, to answer ZBZ's question, no, I did not knowingly breed them, however I collected a fair bit of fallen, decaying oak wood from the area over the course of several years. Much of it contained larvae and some of it adults too. Unfortunately, the stags were too small and too conveniently collected to make intentional breeding attempts necessary. I can direct you to the exact source where you are sure to find them a half hour into your hike, but it looks like you have a source already!
 
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