Dog / Cat bitten by Tarantula

bobusboy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
287
First off I am not trolling, this is a serious question.


Has anyone here had a pet Cat, Dog or other mammal; which was bitten by a Tarantula which subsequently lived or died?


I've read some threads indicating that cats and dogs are particularly sensitive to the venom of tarantulas (in contrast to humans). But where is the proof to back this up?

I do not want to hear horror stories or made up non sense, I'm just wondering if it has happened to any one and what they did about it.

Thanks

PS: If there is a thread somewhere on this I couldn't find it.
 

hassman789

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 2, 2009
Messages
577
I think in one thread they had some records from australia and I don't remember any of it but I think there was alot of dead dogs...:(
 

Kathy

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
852
This has always been a great concern of mine too. I don't worry too much about the bite because they are secure (hopefully) but also the hairs floating around. I have not ready any stories on here, but would be interested in alson finding out more about this.
 

bobusboy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
287
The only threads I've seen with stories of dogs/cats being bitten are troll threads which makes me wonder if it's ever actually happened in North America (Seeing as that is where a majority of users seem to hail from)
 

webbedone

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 27, 2010
Messages
410
There was a thread pertaining to the bite reports and a venom toxicity article somewhere here on the boards, i will look for it and see if i can find it, but as far as i recal all the dogs/cats/vermin, bitten records death within hours at max.
 

Zoltan

Cult Leader
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May 20, 2008
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I think in one thread they had some records from australia and I don't remember any of it but I think there was alot of dead dogs...:(
I believe you are referring to this article:

Isbister G. K., J. E. Seymour, M. R. Gray, R. J. Raven. 2003. Bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and canines. Toxicon 41(4): 519-524.

Abstract. Spiders of the family Theraphosidae occur throughout most tropical regions of the world. There have only been three case reports of bites by these spiders in Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical effects of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders in both humans and canines. Cases of spider bite were collected by the authors over the period January 1978-April 2002, either prospectively in a large study of Australian spider bites, or retrospectively from cases reported to the authors. Subjects were included if they had a definite bite and had collected the spider. The spiders were identified by an expert arachnologist to genus and species level where possible. There were nine confirmed bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and seven in canines. These included bites by two Selenocosmia spp. and by two Phlogiellus spp. The nine spider bites in humans did not cause major effects. Local pain was the commonest effect, with severe pain in four of seven cases where severity of pain was recorded. Puncture marks or bleeding were the next most common effect. In one case the spider had bitten through the patient's fingernail. Mild systemic effects occurred in one of nine cases. There were seven bites in dogs (Phlogellius [sic] spp. and Selenocosmia spp.), and in two of these the owner was bitten after the dog. In all seven cases the dog died, and as rapidly as 0.5-2h after the bite. This small series of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders gives an indication of the spectrum of toxicity of these spiders in humans. Bites by these spiders are unlikely to cause major problems in humans. The study also demonstrates that the venom is far more toxic to canines.
 

Nerri1029

Chief Cook n Bottlewasher
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 29, 2004
Messages
1,727
Zoltan beat me to it.

As for No America I'm going to say that a lack of data points to a few possible explanations:
1- native species aren't dangerous to dogs/cats
2- the number of interactions between these creatures is too rare, both being especially wary of the other?

If there were Vets reporting on these it would be easier to find legit data ( not that I've actually searched )
 

hassman789

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 2, 2009
Messages
577
I believe you are referring to this article:

Isbister G. K., J. E. Seymour, M. R. Gray, R. J. Raven. 2003. Bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and canines. Toxicon 41(4): 519-524.

Abstract. Spiders of the family Theraphosidae occur throughout most tropical regions of the world. There have only been three case reports of bites by these spiders in Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical effects of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders in both humans and canines. Cases of spider bite were collected by the authors over the period January 1978-April 2002, either prospectively in a large study of Australian spider bites, or retrospectively from cases reported to the authors. Subjects were included if they had a definite bite and had collected the spider. The spiders were identified by an expert arachnologist to genus and species level where possible. There were nine confirmed bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and seven in canines. These included bites by two Selenocosmia spp. and by two Phlogiellus spp. The nine spider bites in humans did not cause major effects. Local pain was the commonest effect, with severe pain in four of seven cases where severity of pain was recorded. Puncture marks or bleeding were the next most common effect. In one case the spider had bitten through the patient's fingernail. Mild systemic effects occurred in one of nine cases. There were seven bites in dogs (Phlogellius [sic] spp. and Selenocosmia spp.), and in two of these the owner was bitten after the dog. In all seven cases the dog died, and as rapidly as 0.5-2h after the bite. This small series of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders gives an indication of the spectrum of toxicity of these spiders in humans. Bites by these spiders are unlikely to cause major problems in humans. The study also demonstrates that the venom is far more toxic to canines.
Yeah I think that is what I saw.
 

sugarshark

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
10
i m very concerned as well i have a 70 pond samoyed. would a bite from a mature white giant knee on the nose kill him??
 

Mez

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
215
If your spider can get nose to nose with a dog, you're keeping it incorrectly.
 

Merfolk

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
Messages
1,330
Read about a swollen paw and nose but nothing more, unless of course you get into OW and the Aussies venom have a way harder effect on them than on human and provoked recorded quick deaths. I assume that a dog bitten by a Pokie or S calceatum will have a very very hard day... I think that a small pet would die if bitten by those.
 
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