Does anybody else keep polyxenids?

VolkswagenBug

Arachnobaron
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Feb 26, 2017
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486
I'm a fan of weird, small millipedes, so when I found out about Polyxenida, naturally, I was interested. I got some from Peter Clausen, and the day after I received them, I actually ended up finding many specimens of the same species (or possibly another species in the same genus) in a rotted log near my house. The key to keeping them seems to be a lot of wood with moss on it, and keeping the moss alive is important, from what I've gathered. They're very communal, as well.
Anyway, does anybody else keep them? Or does anybody else keep some other type of strange millipede not commonly found in the hobby?
 

VolkswagenBug

Arachnobaron
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Feb 26, 2017
Messages
486
I am trying to keep Blaniulus guttulatus.
Just looked those up, they're pretty cool. Are you having any success with them? I have a hitchhiking julid in with the polyxenids and it seems to be doing well.
I'd like to learn more about them.
There definitely isn't much information on their captive care, mostly because they're so small and cryptic. It's hard to see them in a regular pede tank because they're only about 4 mm long and they blend in well with substrate and wood, which is required for their health. There's mostly only information on captive care for larger round millipedes, not any sort of flat or bristly milli. Basically, you have to imitate the conditions they would be in in the wild, which requires rotting hardwood, moss, and darkness (at least under a hide, which could be the wood).
I should mention that I'm talking about Polyxenus, most likely, although I'm not completely sure on the specific genus ID because they're not documented well enough.
 

pannaking22

Arachnoemperor
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4,219
I assume they need to be kept cool as well. At that size temp swings would probably kill them relatively quickly.
 

grimmjowls

Arachnoknight
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May 1, 2016
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205
I've been wanting to keep the small millipedes I find around my home but I can't even find out their species, let alone care on them. They're very tiny though, less than an inch.
 

HexaDiplo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 7, 2016
Messages
19
Just looked those up, they're pretty cool. Are you having any success with them? I have a hitchhiking julid in with the polyxenids and it seems to be doing well.

There definitely isn't much information on their captive care, mostly because they're so small and cryptic. It's hard to see them in a regular pede tank because they're only about 4 mm long and they blend in well with substrate and wood, which is required for their health. There's mostly only information on captive care for larger round millipedes, not any sort of flat or bristly milli. Basically, you have to imitate the conditions they would be in in the wild, which requires rotting hardwood, moss, and darkness (at least under a hide, which could be the wood).
I should mention that I'm talking about Polyxenus, most likely, although I'm not completely sure on the specific genus ID because they're not documented well enough.
I found out the species I collected is not Blaniulus guttulatus :/ So I have to research more.
 

HexaDiplo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 7, 2016
Messages
19
I've been wanting to keep the small millipedes I find around my home but I can't even find out their species, let alone care on them. They're very tiny though, less than an inch.
See where they live, and what they seem to eat or gathering around.
 

HexaDiplo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 7, 2016
Messages
19
Just looked those up, they're pretty cool. Are you having any success with them? I have a hitchhiking julid in with the polyxenids and it seems to be doing well.

There definitely isn't much information on their captive care, mostly because they're so small and cryptic. It's hard to see them in a regular pede tank because they're only about 4 mm long and they blend in well with substrate and wood, which is required for their health. There's mostly only information on captive care for larger round millipedes, not any sort of flat or bristly milli. Basically, you have to imitate the conditions they would be in in the wild, which requires rotting hardwood, moss, and darkness (at least under a hide, which could be the wood).
I should mention that I'm talking about Polyxenus, most likely, although I'm not completely sure on the specific genus ID because they're not documented well enough.
I found out the millipedes I collected are Allajulus nitidus! It is a common beautiful species in Scandinavia.
 

VolkswagenBug

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 26, 2017
Messages
486
I assume they need to be kept cool as well. At that size temp swings would probably kill them relatively quickly.
Yes, they're kept at a fairly constant temperature. The temp inside my house doesn't vary as much as the temperature outside.
 

ErinM31

Arachnogoddess
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
1,166
I'm a fan of weird, small millipedes, so when I found out about Polyxenida, naturally, I was interested. I got some from Peter Clausen, and the day after I received them, I actually ended up finding many specimens of the same species (or possibly another species in the same genus) in a rotted log near my house. The key to keeping them seems to be a lot of wood with moss on it, and keeping the moss alive is important, from what I've gathered. They're very communal, as well.
Anyway, does anybody else keep them? Or does anybody else keep some other type of strange millipede not commonly found in the hobby?
How are your polyxenids doing? Thank you for sharing your experience with them! :)
 

mickiem

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Messages
1,542
How are your polyxenids doing? Thank you for sharing your experience with them! :)
I am perplexed about the temperature requirements of some of these small millipeds. For instance, isn't Aphloria tigana from Texas? If they don't burrow a lot, wouldn't the ambient temps in their natural environment be high? What am I missing? Right now I have Auturus evides, Aphloria tigana and Brachcybe and I understand those three need to be kept cooler. Which I am doing but not understanding. Is it elevation? Thanks if you can help! BTW - I am keeping all three at about 68 degrees and all three have shown mating behavior and I have eggs from the Auturus and Brachybe.
 

ErinM31

Arachnogoddess
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
1,166
I am perplexed about the temperature requirements of some of these small millipeds. For instance, isn't Aphloria tigana from Texas? If they don't burrow a lot, wouldn't the ambient temps in their natural environment be high? What am I missing? Right now I have Auturus evides, Aphloria tigana and Brachcybe and I understand those three need to be kept cooler. Which I am doing but not understanding. Is it elevation? Thanks if you can help! BTW - I am keeping all three at about 68 degrees and all three have shown mating behavior and I have eggs from the Auturus and Brachybe.
No, Apheloria tigana are not from Texas -- don't know how Sigling got that so wrong! :shifty: Their range is in North Carolina and Virginia and I believe their habitat the forest floor, which may be rather cool and they probably burrow if it gets hot. It can be surprising just how much cooler it is in the shade!

Btw, you do not need to keep Auturus evides at 68F, but obviously no harm in doing so. :) My colonies of Auturus evides, Euryurus leachii and a third Euryurid species from Florida have all done very well at room temperatures -- too well perhaps -- I should move them to the wine cooler to slow the population explosion! :rofl:

Good to know about Brachycybe -- I haven't had the best of luck with these and shall try keeping them in the wine cooler -- thank you! :D
 
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