Does a T meet this criteria?

Babbage13

Arachnopeon
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Jan 10, 2017
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3
I currently have a 2" lasiodora parahybana and I'm considering getting another T that is similar but will not get as huge or with as irritating of hairs. He's never shot at me but I've heard they're one of the most irritating and give rashes. I'm looking for a T that is:
- generally good tempered
- not very fast
- long lived
- preferably terrestrial but I may make an exception
- fast grower
- hardy/easy to maintain as far as humidity goes
- active at least a little bit/not a pet rock
- less severe hairs or very unlikely to kick them if they're bad

If none meet that criteria, then that's fine. Some suggestions that meet most of them would be very helpful. Thank you for your time ^_^
 

chanda

Arachnoking
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Grammostola pulchripes meets at least most of those criteria - they just aren't very fast growing. Otherwise an all-around great tarantula.

Acanthoscurria geniculata is another good choice. Not one you'll want to handle - they aren't that good-natured - but absolute beasts at feeding time, so a lot of fun to watch. I don't know how bad their hairs are because mine has never kicked hairs at me. (Neither did my L. parahybana, for that matter. My worst offenders for hair kicking are the dang GBBs.)

Brachypelma smithi is another good one. Mine is pretty laid-back without being a total pet rock and the colors are a definite plus.
 

EulersK

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I'd say G. pulchripes is as close as you will likely get. They can grow fairly fast to about 2", but then their growth slows, but there is good growth per molt.

Grammostola pulchripes meets at least most of those criteria - they just aren't very fast growing. Otherwise an all-around great tarantula.
But... giant spider?

My vote goes out to Aphonopelma chalcodes, hands down. You're in the States, meaning you can pick up an adult female for about $50. They are slow growing, so you'll want an adult. Other than that, they meet all your criteria. They max out at 4", they're the definition of docile, they're very long lived, and they're one of the very few arid species that is actually active. Keep it on bone dry substrate, throw in a paper ball for it to play with (because it will), and you're golden.


Honorary mention: E. truculentus. Again, very slow growing, but everything else applies. Adult females go for $75-$125. They need very mild humidity.
 

Arachnomaniac19

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Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens or Brachypelma albopilosum are also something to look into. Both grow pretty fast. The only issue that might arise is that C. cyaneopubescens is known to be a sprinter.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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I would also add Grammostola pulchra to your list of possible Ts, as they meet several of your criteria (except they are slow growers).

Acanthoscurria geniculata is another good choice. Not one you'll want to handle - they aren't that good-natured - but absolute beasts at feeding time, so a lot of fun to watch. I don't know how bad their hairs are because mine has never kicked hairs at me.
Their hairs are fairly bad -- not as bad as Theraphosa or Lasiodora but generally worse than some of the common starter terrestrials like Grammostola, Aphonopelma, or Brachypelma.


Aphonopelma chalcodes
Stop tempting me! :anxious:
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
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Jan 16, 2014
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I read the original post. Thought to myself the best T's would be G.pulchripes (or an adult rosie), A. chalcolodes, or GBB.

Scroll down the post and see all 3 listed...nice.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Acanthoscurria geniculata match well what you are looking for. And they are always out in the open.

As for the urticating setae part, that's a too subjective issue that involves things I can't know, such someone being too sensitive to those while others not. For instance, genus Theraphosa setae are considered the worst, yet someone can be more sensitive to genus Nhandu and so on. Depends, always.
 

Paiige

Arachnobaron
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331
I'd recommend Brachypelma albopilosum - mine is super active (always bulldozing), very sweet, a good eater, has never kicked or lunged at me. I'm not sure about fast growing because I got her as a subadult but she's just closed off her burrow and I believe a molt is coming. I love her dearly and was never too interested in them until by chance I had an opportunity to rescue her and I did, which I would have done no matter what kind of T she was.
 

Red Eunice

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Mar 2, 2014
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Phrixotrichus scrofa!
Medium growth rate, great display type, good eater, small (adults 4"max.), not a heavy webber. A very inquisitive type, similar to Euathlus species, not a hair kicker. Keep on dry substrate, provide a hide, water dish and fake foliage.
It took 4 years from a >1/2" sling to almost a 4" "beast". Burrowed as a sling (most terrestrials will) and once reaching
around 1 1/2" stayed out in the open. She has never threat postured me, only dubia roaches, a prey not to her liking (?).
Can't comment on their lifespan, reports are in the 8-15 year span.
I don't see them offered very often, but I paid $15 or $20 for mine.
 

Babbage13

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But... giant spider?

My vote goes out to Aphonopelma chalcodes, hands down. You're in the States, meaning you can pick up an adult female for about $50. They are slow growing, so you'll want an adult. Other than that, they meet all your criteria. They max out at 4", they're the definition of docile, they're very long lived, and they're one of the very few arid species that is actually active. Keep it on bone dry substrate, throw in a paper ball for it to play with (because it will), and you're golden.


Honorary mention: E. truculentus. Again, very slow growing, but everything else applies. Adult females go for $75-$125. They need very mild humidity.
Aphonopelma chalcodes are very easy to catch here. How will I know if it's wc or cb? Does it matter?
 

Tanner Dzula

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Feb 29, 2016
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i agree with the above men tons of A. Chalcodes. Great species, very active, Minimal effort to keep alive(bone dry substrate and great eaters) and not too bad on the eyes.

Also id say B. Albopilosum. Extremely docile, almost never kick hairs, decent growing speed compared to most(not as fast as Lasidora's but not as slow as Grammys) very hardy and easy to care for, and even though they do like to burrow and stay in their, I've noticed if you give them a starter burrow near the side of the enclosure, they will make a full on cave style burrow against the glass without webbing it over, making it a great viewing window. Mine is always either out on top or inside, but right in view of the glass:

here are examples of mine
 

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Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
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Aphonopelma chalcodes are very easy to catch here. How will I know if it's wc or cb? Does it matter?
As long as you don't plan to Export it anytime soon it shouldn't really matter.
i had some WC and know lots of people who go On little "field trips" to go hunt for wild A. Chalcodes.
as far as health they might be more on the skinny side if they are freshly caught, due to their natural habitats usually being pretty dry. but other then that it shouldn't be an issue.
 

EulersK

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Aphonopelma chalcodes are very easy to catch here. How will I know if it's wc or cb? Does it matter?
I've caught a few in the past, there's absolutely nothing wrong with WC. Just be sure that you don't end up with a mature male - if you do, let it go! It won't live much longer than a year anyway, may as well let it try to reproduce.

I bring that up because mature males are very easy to find and catch simply because they're wandering looking for a female. Females will be tucked deep in their burrow, so you'll need to coax them out. Use a dead blade of grass to tickle their burrow. A spider expecting a meal will come out.
 

Babbage13

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I've caught a few in the past, there's absolutely nothing wrong with WC. Just be sure that you don't end up with a mature male - if you do, let it go! It won't live much longer than a year anyway, may as well let it try to reproduce.

I bring that up because mature males are very easy to find and catch simply because they're wandering looking for a female. Females will be tucked deep in their burrow, so you'll need to coax them out. Use a dead blade of grass to tickle their burrow. A spider expecting a meal will come out.
Would a wc adult female be more likely to be in bad health, bad disposition, or injured? I'm going to probably buy my ts online because I haven't found many t sellers in wichita. I won't be able to see her before I buy her. I'm worried if she was captured she'd be more uneasy in a tank or maybe have parasites. But i have no experience in this.
 

EulersK

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Would a wc adult female be more likely to be in bad health, bad disposition, or injured? I'm going to probably buy my ts online because I haven't found many t sellers in wichita. I won't be able to see her before I buy her. I'm worried if she was captured she'd be more uneasy in a tank or maybe have parasites. But i have no experience in this.
No matter what, these are wild animals. Disposition varies from individual to individual regardless of where you got it. Parasites are a real concern, yes, but a relatively rare one.

I would suggest that you buy online. There are plenty of great sellers right here on this board.
 

Tanner Dzula

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Would a wc adult female be more likely to be in bad health, bad disposition, or injured? I'm going to probably buy my ts online because I haven't found many t sellers in wichita. I won't be able to see her before I buy her. I'm worried if she was captured she'd be more uneasy in a tank or maybe have parasites. But i have no experience in this.
as far as uneasy in a tank, i wouldn't worry about that, just give her plenty of substrate and a good hide/burrow and she will feel right at home.

the big thing i would be concerned about in a WC is Age. because, assuming you find a Full Sized adult female, theres really no way to tell the different between a freshly matured 2 year old or a 12 year old female. so you might luck out getting one towards the end of her life cycle. to prevent this, you couldd try to find a Not fully matured but confirmed female, ensuring she's not already a the end of her life cycle. this is what i did and found a nice 2.5-3 inch female.

as far as injured or parasites. there is a small risk but i wouldn't worry too much about it. just give her a good life, food, water, a burrow and no natural predators and she is certainly going to thrive :)
 

The Grym Reaper

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I'd recommend Brachypelma albopilosum - mine is super active (always bulldozing), very sweet, a good eater, has never kicked or lunged at me. I'm not sure about fast growing because I got her as a subadult but she's just closed off her burrow and I believe a molt is coming. I love her dearly and was never too interested in them until by chance I had an opportunity to rescue her and I did, which I would have done no matter what kind of T she was.
They're one of the faster growing Brachypelmas (certainly faster than my B. smithi and B. emilia anyway), I got a 2" female back in June and she's more than doubled in size since then.
 

Paiige

Arachnobaron
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Here's a photo of by B. albopilosum girl. She's quickly becoming one of my favorites. :)
She rearranged her entire enclosure within 24 hours of putting her in it. It's hilarious watching her walk around with a mouthful of substrate
 
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