Docile/Non-venemous Arborial Snakes?

Mojo Jojo

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Hey, what are some attractive arborial snakes that are both docile and non-venemous?

Jon
 

Devildoll

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There isn't really such a thing.... well not exactly.
amazon tree boas are a great starter aboreal... but they arn't docile. a CB one wont be a problem to deal with, but might snap at you once in a while.

Jungle carpet pythons are ok looking, but a lot easier to deal with.

really with aboreals, each snake is going to have it's own individual temperment.
 

Ravnos

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You could get a little rough green snake. While sometimes they think they're big and mean, they're pretty docile and are cricket eaters. :)

Rav
 
U

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Well,
You will find that most arboreals are hands off display animals. There's always an exception to the rule though. My green tree python is very docile. I don't handle him unless I have to though. I'd suggest one of the carpet python (Morelia spilota ssp.) subspecies. They get between 5-7'. Most are docile if handled regularly, but it really all depends on the indivdual snake. They are easy to take care of if provided with the proper enviornment. It's best to start off with a baby or yearling captive bred snake. Whatever your choice remember to do extensive research before you purchase anything.
Mike
 

Lasiodora

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BTW the above was my reply. I didn't realize I hadn't logged in when I posted that.
 

Bry

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Dragonfly, temperaments among the different arboreal species do vary. I have seen individuals that are very tame, but not within a species, if that makes sense. Like Lasiodora said, many arboreals are hands-off, display snakes.

I personally don't find amazon tree boas to be great starter arboreals. Their feisty temperament is something to be reckoned with. I have seen -very- few amazons that were actually tame, and all those came from a single clutch. So, a tame amazon is not the norm, in the least.

Jungle carpets are great, but they're not typically friendly snakes either. Same goes for the other carpet pythons. Many carpet pythons tame down with age, but then there are some that just don't. My jungle, after 3 years, is finally taming down quite a bit.

Most of the others are too delicate to be considered suitable as a first arboreal, take emerald tree boas or green tree pythons for instance. I have heard good things about Malagasy (or "Sanzinia") tree boas. I don't know how complex their care is, but they are supposedly very tame snakes. However, they're mostly wild-caught, and are quite difficult to find. If you should find one, they are not cheap.

Overall, I'd suggest you look into Irian Jaya carpets. They can be nippy, but are usually tamer than the other carpets. They are attractive, IMO, and don't get as large as other carpets. For a second choice, I'd probably go with jungle carpets. Basically, if you want to get into arboreals, you might end up with a dog tame snake, but don't hold your breath.

This is a friend's Irian Jaya carpet:


Bry
 

Phillip

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My choice for an arboreal...

Don't look past a Chondro regardless of what you mave have heard horror story wise about them being hard to keep. Actually captive bred already feeding Chondros are quite easy to keep. The thing is you can't expect to get a cheap import or one that is not well established and have it do well for you. Also with the exception of a few locales most of them tend to be very reluctant to bite. Arus and Jayapuras are both very calm with Biaks being on the nippy side. Still even a nippy Chondro is no where near as nippy as an Emerald tree boa or an Amazon tree boa. For handling from what I understand Sanzania are also quite calm but they aren't really what I would call an arboreal as they spend more time on the ground than anywhere else. Also they are quite pricey but if price is not a problem they are nice snakes. Another very nice tempered but way pricey one is an Amazon Basin Emerald but then you are getting in the 1500 and up range for a baby. Bang for the buck Chondros are hard to beat as long as you get an established one from a good breeder. Mine has never skipped a meal and never offered to bite whatsoever and has been nothing short of a fantastic pet snake.

Phil
 
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Mojo Jojo

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Phillip, that isn't an emerald tree boa in your picture? It is gorgeous!

Jon
 

Phillip

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Very good Jon....

No it isn't an emerald that's why I refered to my Chondro being a good choice and pointed out that it has never offered to bite. :) Sorry if I caused any confusion by mentioning more than one good choice but the snake in the pic is a male Jayapura Chondro.

Phil
 

Phillip

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babies usually run around 350 each...

An adult like this can go for anywhere from the 400ish range to 6 or 7 depending on coloration and condition. This one in particular is actually for sale at a steal of a price since I have decided not to get him a mate and am trimming back on pets but I kind of doubt he will still be mine after the upcoming show Saturday. Still if interested you can drop me an e-nail and we can discuss it.

Phil
 

LaRiz

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Chondropython viridis

Originally posted by Phillip
No it isn't an emerald that's why I refered to my Chondro being a good choice and pointed out that it has never offered to bite. :) Sorry if I caused any confusion by mentioning more than one good choice but the snake in the pic is a male Jayapura Chondro.
Phil
Chondros. Gotta love 'em. I've had so many. Pretty cool how they're always going to be known as chondros, even though, as you know, they are Morelia. They'll always be known as Chondros to me, old school style.
Heck, even new ophidiophiles call them Chondros.
100 years from now, people will be calling them Chondros, and then asking, "why the heck is Morelia viridis nicknamed Chondros?" But then maybe they won't be Morelia then.
Just like Theraphosa apophysis will always be "Pseudos" to me.
Nice choice and great pic Phil.
john
 

BugBoyX

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Jon...are you looking for a snake that's completely arboreal or just one that likes to climb? If you're looking for the latter, a lot of the rats snakes are very good climbers and like to do it. Also they'er usually fairly cheap and tame very readily. And if you're not looking for something as big as some of the boas and pythons, the ratsnakes mostly top out at about 6ft. I'd stick to the corn snakes (Elaphe guttata) and the American ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta ssp.)..especially the yellows and everglades rats have some great colours. There are some Asian ratsnakes as well, like the Redtailed Rat snake(Gonyosoma oxycephalum) that's can be almost lime green with a blackish red tail....but they tend to be a bit snappy. Also the Taiwan Beauty snakes (Elaphe taeniura ssp) are gorgeous, but do get a bit bigger and don't climb as much as the North American rat snakes.

Hope this helps..........Roy
 

Mojo Jojo

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Originally posted by AGGRO
Jon...are you looking for a snake that's completely arboreal or just one that likes to climb?
Well, I've had rat snakes before. They are great snakes, but if I ever get another snake, I want something a bit more on the exotic side. And until I saw that chondra boa, the emerald tree boa, imo, is like the most striking snake that I have seen.

When I was at the exotic pets store tonight, picking up some pinhead crix, I asked the store owner if he knew about the chondra, and he was selling a yearling for $600.

Well, I'm certainly not in the market for a 600 dollar snake. So I'm just gonna be happy with my tarantulas until I get a couple of promotions at my new job.

Jon
 

Lasiodora

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Big Dragonfly,
Chondros are pythons and they only get to be 6ft. Prices vary according to the snakes locality and lineage. I paid $350 for my male as a baby. I paid much more for a recently purchased female though. If you ever think of getting one, I would buy it through a breeder (will be more expensive, but well worth it). You will have less problems with a captive bred animal. If you are interested in just learning more I'd visit: http://chondroweb.com/

BTW saying that red tail ratsnakes are snappy is an understatement.
Mike
 

funnylori

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Okay, I know this is from 2003, but I am bringing it back to life anyway! I don't see opening up another thread when this one was a helpful start to my question!

I want another snake. I want a sturdy arboreal snake that his non-venemous as well.

My question is, are there other snakes that fall under these two criteria but also stays under 5-6 ft long and are primarily best as displays?

What kind of specialized care do they need? How should I feed them?

What would you consider a good starter venemous arboreal snake

Are there any without defined head/necks? I like the head to be very prominent from the rest of the body. I just like the way it looks, being so graceful and blocky at the same time.

I prefer display animals whenever possible. I bought my fiance a corn snake and it is very unruly. It is definately not used to handeling and is very whippy when we take it out for feeding. We don't see it very often either. I would like a snake that I can see more often.

I would also like to see both ends of the price spectrum. Babies under $100, to babies up to $500-$1000. I spend lots of money on crazy things, so what can I get for the best bang for my buck as well as a treasured jewel? I am inexperienced so far, so you can be rest assured I won't buy anything until I am sure I can give it the full amount of care it requires and deserves.

I allways have a cage set up before anybody comes home, so what kind/size cage should I plan on for the snake? Does it need special ventilation? Humidity? What can/can't I use to build the cage? How should I construct an arboreal feeding box (if there is a special way to feed them)?

Is there any recommended books I should read?

Any special medicines I should have on hand for an arboreal? Medical issues to look out for?

I want to know it all!
 
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