Do ts see/disturbed by red light/acrylic

viper69

ArachnoGod
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No

There’s a free paper out there on spectral sensitivity of A chalcodes for a model

I use blue over red
 

8 legged

Arachnobaron
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It also looks more realistic, we rarely have blood moons😉
The flashlight is still always within reach😁
 

Iamconstantlyhappy

Arachnoknight
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Never thought about using blue light before. 8 legged: Yes, I agree, blue light does appear to be more naturalistic for us to look observe them without constantly disturbing them.
 

Dry Desert

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Never thought about using blue light before. 8 legged: Yes, I agree, blue light does appear to be more naturalistic for us to look observe them without constantly disturbing them.
Exo Terra make a Moonlight / Heat lamp in various wattages from 15 to 100w. I have used them forever. I think red is completely unnatural, and I remember reading somewhere that some inverts actually dislike red lighting.
 

Tarantuland

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They don’t see red light, but I’m doing active research regarding their feeding behavior in red light, fluorescent light and uv light. I’ll obviously post when im done but so far red light seems to trigger more aggression, perhaps because they don’t see me
 

viper69

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They don’t see red light, but I’m doing active research regarding their feeding behavior in red light, fluorescent light and uv light. I’ll obviously post when im done but so far red light seems to trigger more aggression, perhaps because they don’t see me
I also feed mine in darkness


You are doing research in academia?

Find a way to release food remotely to remove yourself from the equation
 

Tarantuland

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I also feed mine in darkness


You are doing research in academia?

Find a way to release food remotely to remove yourself from the equation
I've thought about this but haven't come up with anything yet. Maybe in the future, but I'm already 5 weeks into this project

I also feed mine in darkness
How do y’all do it then? Just feel around the room for the lids of the enclosures? Open them and pray the spider didn’t run out but never really be sure?
 

nicodimus22

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I use red light all the time to watch them at night. It doesn't destroy your night vision the way other colors will.
 

AphonopelmaTX

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You all go through a lot more trouble to feed tarantulas than I do. I just flip on the lights in the room, throw crickets in each enclosure, watch the ones feed who choose to do so, then leave the room. The ones in my collection that don't immediately feed do so after I leave the room whether the lights remain on or not. In my experience, the color and type of light is a negligible factor in prey/ feeding response. Movement in the room and the casting of shadows is however. To me, it is obvious a tarantula will feel you coming before they see you coming. This is even true for my feeder crickets. The crickets, while chirping away in their bin, don't move when the lights come on, but they haul ass as soon as I cast a shadow over them by bending over their bin.
 

viper69

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How do y’all do it then? Just feel around the room for the lids of the enclosures? Open them and pray the spider didn’t run out but never really be sure?
Yep! Not worried about a T running out with certain specimens due to how they are kept.

But I also feed with the lights on too at times.

Just depends on what and how much I need to do, and how fast I want to do it!

Movement in the room and the casting of shadows is however. To me, it is obvious a tarantula will feel you coming before they see you coming. This is even true for my feeder crickets
Identical observations here as well.
 

Dry Desert

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Don't really like the idea of using a heat lamp with my ts.
Don't forget I'm talking UK, and what I use, and what products are available - no-one says rush out and buy some!

They don’t see red light, but I’m doing active research regarding their feeding behavior in red light, fluorescent light and uv light. I’ll obviously post when im done but so far red light seems to trigger more aggression, perhaps because they don’t see me
Or probably because they don't like it!
 

Iamconstantlyhappy

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Viper said:
Identical observations here as well.
Me too, especially the Pokies and Psalmos. I also don't really care about the light when I am feeding. I turn the light on toss in, observe come back later or the next day. If uneaten and they are not about to molt, I will even leave it in for a couple of days. If still not eaten, it becomes food for my Messor barbarus colony. If I just want to observe the really photosensitive ones, I will use a red light from my bike.
 
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darkness975

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You keep them and feed them in total darkness? As your username indicates?
No. I meant I don't use any special red or blue or whatever light. The ambient room light is enough.

You all go through a lot more trouble to feed tarantulas than I do. I just flip on the lights in the room, throw crickets in each enclosure, watch the ones feed who choose to do so, then leave the room. The ones in my collection that don't immediately feed do so after I leave the room whether the lights remain on or not. In my experience, the color and type of light is a negligible factor in prey/ feeding response. Movement in the room and the casting of shadows is however. To me, it is obvious a tarantula will feel you coming before they see you coming. This is even true for my feeder crickets. The crickets, while chirping away in their bin, don't move when the lights come on, but they haul ass as soon as I cast a shadow over them by bending over their bin.
I second this.

Thats all I do is throw a cricket or whatever in there and leave it at that. Remove it if uneaten.
 

Blueandbluer

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Maybe if I had a separate housing area for my Ts I would experiment more with lights... but mine live in my bedroom. So white light it is.
 
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