Do all a.versicolor have purple colouration?

Avablue

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Soon i will be purchasing my first Avicularia versicolor, many that i have seen for sale don't seem to have the purple colouration, is this a sign of poor genetics or just individual variation?
 

BobBarley

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As slings, versicolor are electric blue. Once they hit around 2-3", they will start getting their adult coloration. Adult coloration is reddish purplish body and legs with a tealish carapace. As with all/most t's, coloration fades as it nears a molt. Lighting, and angles can also drastically change coloration.

Here's my sling a couple molts ago under bright LED lighting:
image.jpeg
 

14pokies

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I'm not sure but mine does whhaaaahhh!!! 20161203_105718.jpg

No but seriously they all dispaly varying hues of red and purple. Like mentioned above alot has to do with lighting..

I recently did a video of this girl mating and you would think she was just a regular avic because the light was from further away and at a different angle. In some situations she looks predominantly red. Again lighting and refraction..
 

Venom1080

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I am only going by photos and have never seen one in person. Are the really as beautiful as this, or is this just photoshop at its finest?
with the right lighting and camera you can get that. but they def are stunning even without lighting.
 

Avablue

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All the ones i have seen for sale have a more brownish apperance like this, is this photo just not capturing its beauty, or is this a better representation of the species?
 

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Avablue

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Wow 14pokies she is stunning, are females duller than the males? I apologise if i seem stupid this will be my first t I'm so excited, just want to do my research
 

chanda

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All the ones i have seen for sale have a more brownish apperance like this, is this photo just not capturing its beauty, or is this a better representation of the speices?
That's about what mine (a male) looked like, with ordinary lighting - but with the camera flash, the colors would stand out more. (The same is true of a lot of spiders. My Pamphobeteus sp. "purple bloom" Ecuador looks basically brown if I just glance in his cage, with a purplish cast if I catch him from the right angle - but hit him with the camera flash (or take him outside in natural sunlight) and the purple really pops!)
 

cold blood

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There is certainly some color variance (even through the same spider's life), most I've had were really purple their whole non-blue lives., but the female here turned into @14pokies versi. This is the same t, before and after its most recent molt.

before

after

I wil say, I have never seen any variance with slings, theyre all electric blue.
 

Avablue

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Im sure i won't be disappointed just curious, do they become duller after each molt?
 

Avablue

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My husband is only allowing me to have 1 t (which is definitely going to be a problem) so i wanted to go with something visually stunning and this species stood out. Thanks for your replies guys.
 

14pokies

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Wow 14pokies she is stunning, are females duller than the males? I apologise if i seem stupid this will be my first t I'm so excited, just want to do my research
You don't seem stupid.. The only stupid question is the one that doesn't get asked ( read that in a fortune cookie:cigar:) Lol..

I have heard people say the males of this species are more vibrant but I don't really agree. It's minute details IMO like the males abdomen may be a little more red and his carapace will be a bit brighter.. Eh to me the difference is negligible..

Here is a pic of my very old MM. He is eating a cricket ATM so you can't see much. Even for a MM he is still decent looking though. 20170115_225626.jpg

And here is a but pic that I took earlier tonight of that female in the first pic I posted. She is swollen with eggs! 20170115_215718.jpg
 

Olan

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They are truly shockingly beautiful in person. I just snapped this pic of my old (9 years) female in need of a molt. Still so pretty. But she has lost some of the purple and is more red now. IMG_5070.JPG
 

Moakmeister

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Soon i will be purchasing my first Avicularia versicolor, many that i have seen for sale don't seem to have the purple colouration, is this a sign of poor genetics or just individual variation?
Like the other replies say, it's dependent on lighting. I would compare it to the light/dark streaks on a velvet blanket, how if you rub your hand over it in one direction it turns dark, and vice versa. It can make G. pulchra, a solid black T, look black and gray. It all depends on the way the hairs are pointed in relation to the brightness or color of the light hitting them. Here's one picture in particular I found that looks almost unreal because of how bright it is. Avic versicolor.jpg
 

Avablue

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I was told by the breeder that i will be purchasing my versi from, that this image is photoshoped. Truly is amazing if it isnt tho, what happens under a uv light?
 

Moakmeister

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I was told by the breeder that i will be purchasing my versi from, that this image is photoshoped. Truly is amazing if it isnt tho, what happens under a uv light?
Under a UV light, nothing happens. It's scorpions that fluoresce.
 

SausageinaNet

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It's not only lightning. Some people use editing software like everywhere in photography these days. So you can't always be sure if what you see in the picture is also how it looked in real life.
 

viper69

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Like some of the others here, I've owned a decent amount of A. versi. Though for me, mine have always been male hah. My males were always purplish red, not the reds we seen in Coldblood's. In fact, in my experience I see that color lately less than I do the purples. But perhaps I'm biased to that color and thus don't look at red versi as much.

the purple colouration, is this a sign of poor genetics
TO be devil's advocate, perhaps the purple color is a sign of superior genetics! ;) In point of it fact, it is neither.

I am only going by photos and have never seen one in person. Are the really as beautiful as this, or is this just photoshop at its finest?
IMO, that image is too perfect looking. However, A versi do not disappoint in color. I will caution you that a single T does not always look the same. Their color and brightness can depend upon the angle you view the T, how bright the light is you are using, the color temperature of the light being used to examine the T as well.

In digital imaging all of the above matter in addition to the following variables:
1. The senor chip of the camera
2. The software the camera maker uses to present color on the screen. Some camera's favor green, some red etc..just like FILM. Not all film is the same, not at all.
3. The quality of screen one is using to view said digital image, is it calibrated? Most people DO NOT calibrate their computer monitors.
4. The software the person is using to manipulate the image for any post-processing



All the ones i have seen for sale have a more brownish apperance like this, is this photo just not capturing its beauty, or is this a better representation of the species?
That image on my screen is definitely not brown of any shade. Those setae are red hues.

My husband is only allowing me to have 1 t (which is definitely going to be a problem) so i wanted to go with something visually stunning and this species stood out. Thanks for your replies guys.
Few people will recommend Avics as a first tarantula to a person new to owning Ts-- I'm assuming you are new to owning Ts mind you.

Like the other replies say, it's dependent on lighting. I would compare it to the light/dark streaks on a velvet blanket, how if you rub your hand over it in one direction it turns dark, and vice versa. It can make G. pulchra, a solid black T, look black and gray. It all depends on the way the hairs are pointed in relation to the brightness or color of the light hitting them. Here's one picture in particular I found that looks almost unreal because of how bright it is. View attachment 229367
Def. not real, moss is not shiny.

Under a UV light, nothing happens. It's scorpions that fluoresce.
True on scorps, I heard from a person who owns a lot of scorps that UV light weakens their exoskeleton in captivity.
 
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