Discolored Pedipalps on my Avic Avic, Possible male?

ambitabug

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 26, 2011
Messages
2
(I'm sorry if I am posting this in the wrong place or if it is something that has been discussed before, I am terrible with discussion boards but I am desperate and will figure it out soon enough)

I have very recently adopted a pink toe that I have been told is very very unlikely to live. I don't know a whole lot about this particular spider but it is showing symptoms of Dyskinetic Syndrome. I have read a few reports of Avic Avic's surviving it and having it go away so I am hoping for the best and loving it while I am fortunate enough to have it.

It definitely looks like a juvenile but I am thinking that it might be a male and just slightly smaller? His coloring is gorgeous, though the baldish patch on his abdomen looks like a good indication of an upcoming molt, and he will not accept any food.

My question however, is it possibly having something wrong with its Pedipalps.

While all eight of his cute little pink toes are in fact pink, the tips of his pedipalps are a slightly grayish and his toes look curled under and a little bulbous. Also I have noticed that underneath his pedipalps are what look like hooks with a small bulb on the end almost like the hooks they use to hang on to everything with, but turned backward :(

I am aware that Dyskinetic Syndrome is a symptom of a sickness and was thinking that maybe if there was something treatable wrong with his little pedipalps that maybe he might get better.

Thank you all for your time and if you have any insights PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE let me know!

LOVE AND LIGHT
-Amber
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
First and foremost, a bald spot is not an indication of an upcoming molt. Only if the skin underneath starts darkening.

Now, all of your descriptions you gave have definitely indicated you have a mature male. In which case, not eating is normal. Research some info on mature males. They typically don't last that long after their ultimate molt. Maybe up to a couple years and there is a 99% chance it will not molt again. That is probably why you were told it is unlikely to live.

It probably does not have DKS either, btw.

Find someone with a female and get yourself some slings.

Good luck.
 
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ambitabug

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 26, 2011
Messages
2
Thanks for your reply.

I'm going to post a video very shortly.

Thank you for the bit about the bald spot, it definitely is very dark where the spot it (like when all of my other T's have been about to molt.)

The reason I think it might have DKS is because of his movement.
When he attempts to move his legs the generally all jerk up in the way that I have seen TONS of videos of T's doing before the owner reports the death (super sad face)
I did look into the mature males though (thank you also for that). I do agree that he is most likely a mature male, but I don't think I could possibly breed him in the condition he's in as he can hardly walk... unless this is typical behavior for a dying mature male, in which case, what should I do for him? Keep him comfortable until the end?

Your feedback is GREATLY appreciated :)

-Amber
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
283
Perfect description of a MM - So, if he is indeed "preparing" for a post-ultimate molt - he likely won't survive long and you're probably correct that he wouldn't be able to breed in his condition. So, yes, enjoy him as long as you have him and don't worry too much about "comfort" - it's a natural process and they don't really "suffer" the way that we as humans would.

As far as the potential for DKS - I'm just hypothisizing because I don't really know - I would assume that behavior could be part of a MM getting ready to molt again . . . if he really does have DKS as well, then he's really an unlucky old guy.
 
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