Directly Misting The Tarantula

Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
In essence, you missed the point of my entire rebuttal.

I'll make it as simple as possible - based on negative physical response, tarantulas appear to dislike being sprayed with water, therefore, avoid spraying them with water.
I think I've addressed that several times and I don't think most people had a problem with my explanation. Just because it's not pleasant doesn't mean it's not good and just because it's not good doesn't mean it's not pleasant. I even cited examples of things that were terribly uncomfortable and, in fact, horribly painful but were necessary for survival. It's not just my opinion that discomfort does not equal bad, it's well documented fact. Your assertion that a spider doesn't like it therefore it must be bad isn't refuted by that idea, but you must admit that the possibility exists for it to be true.
 

goodoldneon

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 25, 2011
Messages
243
I think I've addressed that several times and I don't think most people had a problem with my explanation. Just because it's not pleasant doesn't mean it's not good and just because it's not good doesn't mean it's not pleasant. I even cited examples of things that were terribly uncomfortable and, in fact, horribly painful but were necessary for survival. It's not just my opinion that discomfort does not equal bad, it's well documented fact. Your assertion that a spider doesn't like it therefore it must be bad isn't refuted by that idea, but you must admit that the possibility exists for it to be true.
:wall:

It provides no discernible benefit – they cannot and do not injest water sprayed on their carapace or abdomen – there are other, more appropriate ways to provide water – it appears to piss them off – therefore, given that there are many, less annoying alternatives, a water-dish, misting the substrate or sides of the enclosure, injecting water into the substrate using a syringe – it would seem to me, as a pet owners, we should go out of our way to avoid causing unnecessary stress and discomfort. That’s called compassion, responsible pet ownership and plain old common sense. My cat doesn’t appear to enjoy being petted “against the grain” rather than attempt to rationalize why I should, despite the fact she doesn’t like it, I don’t – it’s that simple.
 
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Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
OK, clearly there is a misunderstanding here somewhere. I'm pretty sure I have very specifically addressed each and every one of your points on misting. Correct me if I'm wrong. Did I miss something or was it just that my answers weren't in line with what you believe or is there another option that I'm not thinking of. I am more than willing to listen to anything you or anyone else has to say but I think I should be allowed the same courtesy. If you say something that I can't refute, whether I like it or not I will concede, but so far that hasn't happened to my knowledge. If it has, I apologize and I'd appreciate another chance to hear what you have to say.
 

Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
In essence, you missed the point of my entire rebuttal.

I'll make it as simple as possible - based on negative physical response, tarantulas appear to dislike being sprayed with water, therefore, avoid spraying them with water.
I got the point of your rebuttal and I addressed it. You, however, have missed the point of mine and have not addressed it. Using your logic, people dislike root canals so we shouldn't do them. Another example, dogs dislike having their bits clipped so they can't make puppies anymore so we shouldn't do that anymore either. Examples are abundant, suffice it to say, I addressed your rebuttal, now address mine. Spiders can't drink water that's sprayed on their carapace... Please direct your attention to the Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus). It can drink by simply sitting in water. How does it manage such a miraculous feat? Capillary action. A well known, well documented occurrence in which water is wicked from one place to another, such as from a carapace to the underside of a body.
http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?167768-Tarantula-straws&
A good read on the very effect that I'm talking about. It doesn't prove anything except that it's not unheard of, except by some.
Next,
It provides no discernible benefit
. You don't really know that do you? You believe that, apparently with all your heart, but you don't actually know it. Water is used everyday in a beneficial capacity for most of the animals on this planet, why would it be assumed that tarantulas are the one creature that doesn't benefit from a good cleansing now and again? Of course there might be other benefits besides just cleanliness that I don't know about, but I'm not crossing anything off the list just yet.
it would seem to me, as a pet owners, we should go out of our way to avoid causing unnecessary stress and discomfort.
Absolutely. I agree 100% with you on that. I think I applauded you and all the others for caring for their animals the way that you clearly do. I don't know about anyone else but I certainly do not fault you for the way you treat your animals and I applaud you for it. The problem I have is when people speak in absolutes without actually having proof and observation has been proven to be faulty more than once, on a global scale no less.

My whole argument is simply this, just because they don't like it doesn't mean there are no benefits. It just means they don't like it. That's all. There is no proof that it makes them live longer, die sooner, grow larger or anything else. There just isn't. I do not now nor have I ever disagreed on whether they like it or not. I believe that they don't like it, same as you. I don't advocate misting. I don't advocate not misting either. It's up to the person keeping them. There are arguments for both sides. That means that no one knows. If someone did know, there couldn't be an argument, there would be absolute proof.
 

Garnet3942

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
101
Well, there are spiders that bathe in their water bowls. I also remember a method that a highly respected person does here (forget his name but he wrote a book. I think the tarantula handbook or some sort. Mostly likely schultz). He has a deep burrowing species of a tarantula and to maintain humdity, he douses the entire burrow of the tarantula with a glass if water (with the t inside the burrow). So, if the t can handle huge amountsnof water, what are a few droplets?

There are also some Ts that submerge themselves completely in water.

I mist them to ensure directly to ensure they have water. I also like simulating the rain they would experience.

---------- Post added 09-18-2014 at 10:24 AM ----------



I also mist the webbings of my ceratogyrus darlingi. It's abdomen shrinks ever so often with the constant webbing so i make sure it gets water. Sometimes the ts get in thr way of the web lol
My tarantulas home is in the rainforest and drinks off the plastic I have a small waterbowl I made for the sling I have seen it put its abdomen in there and hung it's legs out (sling is quite fat lol) like a beanbag it was adorable and my dad claims that the sling "likes it when he sprays the cage but, no it hides under leaves and runs around avoiding it but that's how we give it water I never see it drink out of the waterbowl. I agree and I try to make it feel like home for the sling.
 

Dorifto

Bananas
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Messages
775
Guys/Gals this is serious I don’t understand how people can pretend that watering your pets is bad. This is how I hydrate my cats, they hiss a lot but I found is the only way I can really soak them.
That could end in a caTastrophe 😂😂😂
 
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