Damon variagatus culture

KingDiamond

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If anyone has ever successfully raised Damon, I have a quick question. Once the eggs hatched did you segregate the female with her young? I will probably remove the male to play it safe. Any suggestions?
 

Elytra and Antenna

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I've heard you can keep the male in but the one time I gave it a shot he ate every last one on the day of hatching.
BTW- D. diadema are common and larger, variegatus are smaller and nonexistent in the NA hobby.
 

cacoseraph

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i read a paper or two indicating Damon species are not all that conspecifically tolerant.

same paper said the Paraphrynus species in FL is dang near communal, though
 

Michiel

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Only a handfull of species can be (or should be) kept together as adults, because they seem to tolerate eachother. One or two Damon species, and one or two Euphrynichus species. All other species should be housed single. Young stages could be kept in groups, but as they grow older, the become more agressive to eachother.
My advice is to separate the young from the parents and keep the young separate or in small groups untill you can keep the yougn separate.
 

Elytra and Antenna

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same paper said the Paraphrynus species in FL is dang near communal, though
I have heard they're found in large numbers together in the wild sometimes but I've seen much worse cannibalism with these guys in captivity. Of course it doesn't change how you define the social relationship, many ant colonies eat their own young in captivity.
 

zonbonzovi

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I had the pleasure last week of seeing Phrynus marginemaculata in its native environs. From seeing around 20+ here are a few interesting observations: specimens were never found under the same rock with the exception of very small individuals with much larger ones(prob. mum); always found under loose & large (1 ft.+) limestone and in the most locally arid habitat(never in a noticeably moist area or under bark/fallen wood); never found in any situation that could be categorized as "arboreal"; almost always in very close proximity to small termites.
 

Banshee05

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hmmm...
Paraphrynus are extremly aggressiv and not social (i keep cubensis, mexicanus, azteca, emuciatus) and NOONE tolerate others... just in part of the sex, but no longer. and either mating is very risky in some cubensis e.g.

very social is of course E.bacillifer (not all species Michiel, amanica knows noone, so you cannot say it), diadema. then just in juv. stages till no sex is morphological determined: annulatipes, tibialis, variegatus, etc.
very aggressiv also in the first molt are e.g. P.ceylonicus, P.orientalis, Charon grayi...
not social to other males, but to a lot of females in adulthood: P.margeninemaculatus, P.barbadensis, Charinus spp., Sarax spp.,...

sadly a lot of people are telling a lot about this creatures, but most of them didn't know anything in fact...
 

zonbonzovi

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Just wanted to make sure I read that correctly:

P. marginemaculata females are tolerant of one another, but not the males, yes?

Sorry to hijack, King...
 

Banshee05

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Just wanted to make sure I read that correctly:

P. marginemaculata females are tolerant of one another, but not the males, yes?

Sorry to hijack, King...
yep. juv. species can be keept together, then later males kill each other. females tolerate other females.
but i just that is gernal in a lot of species that tey tolerate all (instead males males) but when the molt, they are very vounerable, then most of them get a little hurt but touching another species "territory" then they die, in nature, most fresh molted species would hide some days/weeks till they strong enought to stand for some contact with any other
 

Michiel

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very social is of course E.bacillifer (not all species Michiel, amanica knows noone, so you cannot say it), diadema. QUOTE]


Hi Michael,

I was just reproducing, in my own words, what Wheygoldt wrote in his 2000 book. So, that only one or two Damon and one or two Euphrynichus species can be kelpt together in pairs. The fact that not many people know E.amanica, does not change this information from Wheygoldt, doesn't it?
I am not sure I fully understand what you mean...:? If I gave wrong info, or misinterpreted something, please let me know, as I am only beginning to learn about these creatures.

Cheers, Michiel
 

Banshee05

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hi Michiel,
hmmm then you had to citation the book before...
WEYGOLDT Peter (2000): Whp spiders (Chelicerata: Amblypygi) Their Biology, Morphology and Systematics.

in adults a lot of the species can be keept for a while together, this is fact... much more, also Dr.Weygoldt just know yet and noone knows, and we had to try it by ourself. In fact i breed a lot of the guys, and can tell you a lot on them.
 

Michiel

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hi Michiel,
hmmm then you had to citation the book before...
WEYGOLDT Peter (2000): Whp spiders (Chelicerata: Amblypygi) Their Biology, Morphology and Systematics.

in adults a lot of the species can be keept for a while together, this is fact... much more, also Dr.Weygoldt just know yet and noone knows, and we had to try it by ourself. In fact i breed a lot of the guys, and can tell you a lot on them.
Hi Michael,

No, citation was not needed, because I did not cite, but I put information derived from the book in my own words. Citation is only needed, when you reproduce information literally from a certain source. ;):D

I already noticed in our last telephone call,that you know a lot about whip spiders :D

cheers, Michiel
 

Banshee05

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Hi Michael,

No, citation was not needed, because I did not cite, but I put information derived from the book in my own words. Citation is only needed, when you reproduce information literally from a certain source. ;):D

I already noticed in our last telephone call,that you know a lot about whip spiders :D

cheers, Michiel
that'S not the point my friend ;)
you descirbed it, but so everybody think that is your own expericence and knowledge... and not from a book in practicies :)
whatever :) everything is mentioned now.
 

Elytra and Antenna

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Citation is only needed, when you reproduce information literally from a certain source. ;):D
That is not true.

"A prime purpose of a citation is intellectual honesty; to attribute to other authors the ideas they have previously expressed, rather than give the appearance to the work's readers that the work's authors are the original wellsprings of those ideas." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citation
 

Michiel

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That is not true.

"A prime purpose of a citation is intellectual honesty; to attribute to other authors the ideas they have previously expressed, rather than give the appearance to the work's readers that the work's authors are the original wellsprings of those ideas." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citation
This is about if a citation is needed, I know the definition and purposes of a citation, but thanks for posting it anyway. I am stating these things from a Law point of view and if you would sue me for the above, you would not have a case. We are on a forum here, where people continously share knowledge, and I don't see a lot of citations while people share knowledge, and that's logical because it is not necessary. It is not that I published other peoples intellectual property as my own in a scientific magazine or something. In that case you both would have point, but now you don't. Btw, I believe in protecting intellectual properties so don't get me wrong please.
I do agree with the fact that it might be suggestable that I posted from my own experience and knowledge, which is of course, not the case. So,to correct this:
People, my posts above are based on the book of P.Wheygoldt, 2000 "Biology of whip spiders, Their biology, morphology and systematics."


Cheers, Michiel
 
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