D. Diamantinensis or C. Avicularia (1st spider!)?

C. Versicolor or D. Diamantinensis?


  • Total voters
    4

ScaredOfThem

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 8, 2022
Messages
12
I've chosen these 2 between the many awesome colorful spiders, new world.
Before I actually buy one I will learn all I can about it and trusted husbandry provided on these boards. It will take some months! But part of any hobby is reading and searching about the subject at hand. I enjoy this aspect too.

1. Max size Of each?
2. Which of these have heavier webbing?
3. Which of these are most visible (burrows less)
4. Which of these grow faster?
5. Which of these are faster and jumpy.
(I do not want to touch any tarantula) (I am fearful but motivated to learn and be comfortable)

Please do not recommend some of the more beginner-friendly species, I do not like their look. I rather do without a T for months and months until I've consumed all the quality info on it and do it right and get the spider look that I want.

Thank you all!
 
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spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
758
I've chosen these 2 between the many awesome colorful spiders, new world.
Before I actually buy one I will learn all I can about it and trusted husbandry provided on these boards. It will take some months! But part of any hobby is reading and searching about the subject at hand. I enjoy this aspect too.

1. Max size Of each?
2. Which of these have heavier webbing?
3. Which of these are most visible (burrows less)
4. Which of these grow faster?
5. Which of these are faster and jumpy.
(I do not want to touch any tarantula) (I am fearful but motivated to learn and be comfortable)

Please do not recommend some of the more beginner-friendly species, I do not like their look. I rather do without a T for months and months until I've consumed all the quality info on it and do it right and get the spider look that I want.

Thank you all!
By C. avicularia, do you actually mean C. versicolor?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,983
neither of these are good first Ts as I told you in the PM, but more than 1 opinion is good to get.

I've owned both species to adults

2. Which of these have heavier webbing? varies by specimen
3. Which of these are most visible (burrows less) > neither
4. Which of these grow faster? both
5. Which of these are faster and jumpy> both.
 

ScaredOfThem

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 8, 2022
Messages
12
neither of these are good first Ts as I told you in the PM, but more than 1 opinion is good to get.

I've owned both species to adults

2. Which of these have heavier webbing? varies by specimen
3. Which of these are most visible (burrows less) > neither
4. Which of these grow faster? both
5. Which of these are faster and jumpy> both.
I see.... Darn... Just want something colorful as my first.
While these web...they don't hang out in the webbing?
I guess I wish for a colorful but slower (at least not jumpy one at first)

Maybe there is no way around it... Maybe I have to give up on the appearance preference on my first T....?
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
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Messages
758
If I had to choose one of the two options you mentioned, I'd pick the D. diamantinesis. This is mainly because husbandry for Versis and Avics can be challenging to get correct for beginners. It's possible if you do the research, but I personally don't recommend them as first tarantulas. Be aware that D. diamantinesis is very skittish and fast, though. If you're going to get this species, I'd definitely watch some videos on rehousing and husbandry ( Tom Moran's YouTube channel is a great place to start). I think that a better beginner tarantula would be a GBB, but that's my opinion.

I see.... Darn... Just want something colorful as my first.
While these web...they don't hang out in the webbing?
I guess I wish for a colorful but slower (at least not jumpy one at first)

Maybe there is no way around it... Maybe I have to give up on the appearance preference on my first T....?
You don't have to "give it up". There are PLENTY of more beginner-friendly alternatives that are stunningly beautiful! Instead of looking at individual species, may start researching a few genera that tend to be great for beginners. Brachypelma, Grammostola, Aphonopelma, etc. are good places to start. Even some of the more uncommon species can be beginner-friendly.
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
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Messages
758
What exactly are you looking for in a tarantula? If you give me some traits that you're looking for I may be able to give some more suggestions.
 

ScaredOfThem

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 8, 2022
Messages
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What exactly are you looking for in a tarantula? If you give me some traits that you're looking for I may be able to give some more suggestions.
I want it to be colorful most of all, I'd like to see it almost everyday, a glimpse at least
I guess I need it to not be so jumpy to make rehousing easier for me.

Really it!

get a fish and move on already. already gave you a great first T species suggestion and in your PM to me you shot it down like an American shooting down a Nazi bomber



they are not orb weavers
I'll move on from that suggestion yet again! Thanks, don't bother responding to my threads, I will manage without you in these forums. Plenty of others are knowledgeable as well.
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
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OK. I have a few suggestions.
-B. horrida is one. They're a really unique looking tarantula, and are considered beginner friendly. They have a bright orange/ red carapace and black legs. Photos don't really do them justice. When I saw some slings at a reptile show I was in awe! They're a medium sized tarantula.

-P. sazimai. They're a really beautiful blackish-blue color, brightest after a molt. A little more skittish, but I'd consider them beginner friendly if you've done your research.

-B. klaasi. A Brachypelma species, but they look a bit different. As adults they have beautiful pink setae on their legs. They do take a LONG time to grow though!

These are just a few ideas to look into that may not have heard of.
 

Jonathan6303

Arachnobaron
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477
Here’s the problem ts are primitive animals which in my experience(granted I keep many fossorials) known for not wanting to be out in the open. If you want an animal that you can see interact with everyday tarantula is definitely not the best option. Tarantula are not visible animals there very cautious for predators. I usually get a sighting once a week. Most of the time there in there burrow. My b auratum sling molted and sealed of its burrow the next week which is still sealed. My c versicolor always stayes behind her cork bark
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
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Messages
758
Here’s the problem ts are primitive animals which in my experience(granted I keep many fossorials) known for not wanting to be out in the open. If you want an animal that you can see interact with everyday tarantula is definitely not the best option. Tarantula are not visible animals there very cautious for predators. I usually get a sighting once a week. Most of the time there in there burrow. My b auratum sling molted and sealed of its burrow the next week which is still sealed. My c versicolor always stayes behind her cork bark
This is very true. It's important to have realistic expectations when you first start keeping tarantulas. They hide and remain still the majority of the time. They can be in premolt for months.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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My c versicolor always stayes behind her cork bark
Same here for all the dozens and dozens of Avics I've raised. Humans are hard wired for vision so they want to see. Ts are not, and they hide a lot...it's a conflict of selfishness vs survival of the 2 species

I'd like to see it almost everyday,
Get a tattoo ;) :rofl: :rolleyes:, what you want doesn't generally exist w/these animals. Despite what many people have already told you, you ask the same questions, and get disappointed, annoyed whatever when people attempt to properly set expectations.
 

Crazyarachnoguy

Arachnoknight
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I want it to be colorful most of all, I'd like to see it almost everyday, a glimpse at least
I guess I need it to not be so jumpy to make rehousing easier for me.

Really it!
Arboreal spiders such as a versicolor are jumpy in nature. They can be skittish and also even jump. GBB is the same in regards to being skittish. If you want something that is out all the time, you’ll have to chose a different species
 

ScaredOfThem

Arachnopeon
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Messages
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I mean seeing the thing once a week or when it feeds or making a web would be cool, sure would love it daily but I understand they like hide... But just wouldn't enjoy the terrestrial type thst burrows and you see it twice a year or whatever... To me that's just not fun
 

Crazyarachnoguy

Arachnoknight
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I mean seeing the thing once a week or when it feeds or making a web would be cool, sure would love it daily but I understand they like hide... But just wouldn't enjoy the terrestrial type thst burrows and you see it twice a year or whatever... To me that's just not fun
I see my GBB everyday usually but that’s not to say you will if you get one. Do you like the looks of the brachypelma genus? They’re typically out on display 24/7 as adults.
 

Jonathan6303

Arachnobaron
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I know what you mean but even feeding sometimes just opening the lid causes them a fright and they will just snatch the cricket and hid behind the cork bark. As soon as my e murinus snatches a cricket she goes all the way back down to the bottom of her whole. It’s probably more my situation since most of my collection is fossorial timid ow slings so I get special treatment.
 

ScaredOfThem

Arachnopeon
Joined
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Messages
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I know what you mean but even feeding sometimes just opening the lid causes them a fright and they will just snatch the cricket and hid behind the cork bark. As soon as my e murinus snatches a cricket she goes all the way back down to the bottom of her whole. It’s probably more my situation since most of my collection is fossorial timid ow slings so I get special treatment.
Sounds good to me.. I'm happy with just a glimpse lol. Don't need it to dance for me.. Just a weekly sighting. I won't constantly dick around with the enclosure or force it out or make his hide awkward so I can see more.. Just watching it come get food once a while would be cool!
 

ResinBomb

Arachnopeon
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The Gbb will be skittish although you get to enjoy it much more. It's super hardy and will hit prey like a truck at times. I wouldn't get anything under an 1" or 1 1/2" as they get much more hardy.

Your not gonna see a veriscolor often they love to hide. With out the proper knowledge you are guaranteed to kill it. Especially if you get a sling. Part of the reasons certain species are not considered beginner friendly is not only because of more intricate care but your purchasing a somewhat expensive ghost. For a more extensive way of saying it. Its a very hard turn off for people new to the hobby, such as your self, to spend $60 to $100, plus the price of your husbandry, to get something that you never get to look at because it's hiding.
 
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viper69

ArachnoGod
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I mean seeing the thing once a week or when it feeds or making a web would be cool, sure would love it daily but I understand they like hide... But just wouldn't enjoy the terrestrial type thst burrows and you see it twice a year or whatever... To me that's just not fun
goodbye mini-GBB in my experience
 
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