D. diamantinensis. Color variation.

Arachnid Addicted

Arachnodemon
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Sorry, this is one more of those "this is another one of those threads". :bored:

That being said...

Here's something most keepers don't know.
D. diamantinensis has 3 color variations, all of them live in the same region (near each other, btw).
They are green, blue and dark/black, accordingly with their carapace.

Here are one pic of each:
Dark/black
_MG_3506.JPG.jpg

Green
_MG_2652.JPG.jpg

Blue
_MG_8614.JPG.jpg

Here's the catch, though, the blue variation in this picture was born from a pairing of green x dark, and it looks exactly the same as the ones found in situ, not only that, the blue ones are hard to find, even in situ. Were they a color variation generated from a pairing of green x dark in nature? Lets discuss (RESPECTIFULLY) about it. :)
 
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Petross

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Sorry, this is one more of those "this is another one of those threads". :bored:

That being said...

Here's something most keepers don't know.
D. diamantinensis has 3 color variations, all of them live in the same region (near each other, btw).
They are green, blue and dark/black, accordingly with their carapace.

Here are one pic of each:
Dark/black
View attachment 323181

Green
View attachment 323183

Blue
View attachment 323184

Here's the catch, though, the blue variation in this picture was born from a pairing of green x dark, and it looks exactly the same as the ones found in situ, not only that, the blue ones are hard to find, even in situ. Were they a color variation generated from a pairing of green x dark in nature? Lets discuss (RESPECTIFULLY) about it. :)
Very nice explenation, i just bought one small one, so i am very curious what form i have.
 

Vanessa

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I'm not disputing that there are different variations, but are all three of those individuals the same size/age? Are all three full grown adults? And are they all the same sex?
 

Crystal Spider

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D. diamantinensis is my favorite spider and I read all threads about it on arachnoboards. This is the first time I've heard about three color variations and I am very interested regarding this information. There are some tarantula experts on this board... Can you confirm this? Is it "official"?
 

Theneil

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D. diamantinensis is my favorite spider and I read all threads about it on arachnoboards. This is the first time I've heard about three color variations and I am very interested regarding this information. There are some tarantula experts on this board... Can you confirm this? Is it "official"?
i have heard of a dark color form. Butbi believe there is only 1 variant available in the hobby (outside of brazil) ATM so there is not much information about the others.
 

EtienneN

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That right there green colour form is a total beaut! You guys in Europe got any of these?
 

AphonopelmaTX

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"These types of threads" would benefit greatly with proof that the color variations are all the same species. If some images of the diagnostic characters from all variants were to be provided for comparison to the description, then I would take these types of posts more seriously. Without supporting evidence, we all have to take someone's word on it and that hardly works out in the tarantula keeping hobby.
 

boina

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As far as I know diamantinensis blue is the juvenile coloring. They turn green with the maturing molt. I've some old pics of mine where she was blue and I try to take some pics of the same spider later - she's definitely green now. I'll post it later in the day when I've had my morning coffee etc. (7 am here atm).
 

Arachnid Addicted

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The green variation in this thread was always green, individuals from the same eggsac was always green too.

The blue variation in this thread, like I said, came from a green x dark pairing, but it was always blue, the blue ones observed in situ since slings was always blue either.

The dark/black variation was examined with taxonomic (is that a word?) keys and they were proven to be D. diamantinensis too.

I know that some green variations were once, blue (and vice versa), and I've also seen some black ones turning into blue/green, I believe all these color variations breed in situ, but there aren't any proof about it yet.

There are also purpleish ones, and these are even rarer to see in situ, than the blue ones.

"These types of threads" would benefit greatly with proof that the color variations are all the same species. If some images of the diagnostic characters from all variants were to be provided for comparison to the description, then I would take these types of posts more seriously. Without supporting evidence, we all have to take someone's word on it and that hardly works out in the tarantula keeping hobby.
Unfortunately, when it comes to science, there aren't any article describing these color variations. These observations were made by keepers that could wc individuals from the same location and compared them with taxonomic keys.

I'm not disputing that there are different variations, but are all three of those individuals the same size/age? Are all three full grown adults? And are they all the same sex?
The green and dark/black ones are adult females and have the same age (about 7 years, now). The blue one has almost 2 years, it's a female too and she (or her siblings) was always blue.
 
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Crystal Spider

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You have a lot of experience and good contacts, so you might be right. Nevertheless, I would like to point out that my adult female looks like the dark variation without good lighting or during premolt. And like the green/teal variation with strong lighting or photo-flash. Same effect with many colorful tarantulas like C. cyaneopubescens, P. sazimai, C. versicolor, etc.

I am happy that some research is done regarding Dolichothele diamantinensis. There isn't much information available. Maybe someone will finally figure out, if the venom is strong compared to other NW tarantulas, due to the lack of urticating setae.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Crystal Spider

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I decided to believe in the color variations and start my quest. One day I will care for females of all colors. And even explore the legend of the purplish diamantinensis. :alien

@Arachnid Addicted please continue the research! :)
 

viper69

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"These types of threads" would benefit greatly with proof that the color variations are all the same species.
I was going to write the exact same thing!


I've never heard of 3 color variations, doesn't mean it doesn't exist of course. However, @Arachnid Addicted where do you have this new knowledge from????
 

Crystal Spider

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My quest is on standby. It's complicated.

I checked the gallery of Arachnid Addicted. He is legit and has a good reputation.

On the other hand it's easy to take photos of all three color variations from the same spider. When my female is in a strong lighted area it looks like the blue or even the green/teal variation. On a photo with flash it's definitely the green/teal look. Without very good lighting it often looks like the dark variation. Premolt or freshly molted is also relevant. And of course the white balance of the photo.

The three photos of Arachnid Addicted don't show the same spider, but the light situation, angle and white balance differ a lot. The green/teal photo is taken from above with a strong flash. Blue photo has a different angle and less light. Just like the dark photo with the least light.

@Arachnid Addicted do you own the three spiders? Did you observe the breedings, etc. yourself? This would make the situation clearer. At least for me.

I am excited for the quest and I don't like to be the skeptic. But someone has to be. So please don't take it the wrong way.
 

Arachnid Addicted

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I was going to write the exact same thing!


I've never heard of 3 color variations, doesn't mean it doesn't exist of course. However, @Arachnid Addicted where do you have this new knowledge from????
These colors variations arent in any article. I know some people that went to the region this species can be found and observed them in situ. Different individuals with different colorations were wc and checked with taxonomic keys, all three of them matched with D. diamantinensis. Adult females with different colors were found in situ, and kept their coloration til they died from ageing proven that its not a "stage of life" thing.
The blue ones, however, were harder to find.

My quest is on standby. It's complicated.

I checked the gallery of Arachnid Addicted. He is legit and has a good reputation.

On the other hand it's easy to take photos of all three color variations from the same spider. When my female is in a strong lighted area it looks like the blue or even the green/teal variation. On a photo with flash it's definitely the green/teal look. Without very good lighting it often looks like the dark variation. Premolt or freshly molted is also relevant. And of course the white balance of the photo.

The three photos of Arachnid Addicted don't show the same spider, but the light situation, angle and white balance differ a lot. The green/teal photo is taken from above with a strong flash. Blue photo has a different angle and less light. Just like the dark photo with the least light.

@Arachnid Addicted do you own the three spiders? Did you observe the breedings, etc. yourself? This would make the situation clearer. At least for me.

I am excited for the quest and I don't like to be the skeptic. But someone has to be. So please don't take it the wrong way.
All three individuals were photographed with the same equipment but on different angles, the blue ones I knew kept their blue colors til they died. I've had few dark/black and green individuals, all of them kept their colors the entire lives (considering when they lost that "recently borned sling color", lol).

I've never observed the pairings in situ, only within keepers. I tried to breed them 3x already, 2x the females molted and the other, the eggsac got funghus. :(

Like I said before in this thread, though, blue individuals were born from dark/black x green pairings, given that the blue ones are harder to find when comparing to the other 2, leads people to believe that these pairings happen in situ too, since they are all the same species and live near each other.
 

Crystal Spider

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@Arachnid Addicted

You kept the dark and the green variation yourself. And you have seen the blue variation live at it's keeper. Even more important: You are the photographer of the three pictures in the first post. Is that right?

If this is the case, you've convinced me. And my quest continues. ;)
 

Arachnid Addicted

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@Arachnid Addicted

You kept the dark and the green variation yourself. And you have seen the blue variation live at it's keeper. Even more important: You are the photographer of the three pictures in the first post. Is that right?

If this is the case, you've convinced me. And my quest continues. ;)
The blue ones I got right now have 1 year old, a lil bit more, maybe. But they started to show blue colors since slings.

And yes, I pics were shot by me, in fact, all pics you see with the watermark "@arachnid.addicted" (Ig account) on them, are mine.
 

Petross

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Sorry, this is one more of those "this is another one of those threads". :bored:

That being said...

Here's something most keepers don't know.
D. diamantinensis has 3 color variations, all of them live in the same region (near each other, btw).
They are green, blue and dark/black, accordingly with their carapace.

Here are one pic of each:
Dark/black
View attachment 323181

Green
View attachment 323183

Blue
View attachment 323184

Here's the catch, though, the blue variation in this picture was born from a pairing of green x dark, and it looks exactly the same as the ones found in situ, not only that, the blue ones are hard to find, even in situ. Were they a color variation generated from a pairing of green x dark in nature? Lets discuss (RESPECTIFULLY) about it. :)
So here is mine after molt
 
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