crotalus viridus and crotalus willardi

Widowman10

Arachno WIDOW
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Jan 25, 2007
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snapped some pics of my buddy's rattlers today. looks like the viridus is going to molt any day now. i love the eye color right before a shed...





head sticking out to say hello from her favorite hide:



just hanging out:





this is her other favorite hiding spot during the day:





and just for kicks, i snapped a few pics of the willardi, since i don't think those are too extremely common.

it's always just sitting here, waiting...



but does watch my every move while i'm in the room. snappy little critter.



chillin out under a scrape, awaiting dinner:



obligatory tongue shot:



little pile of unhappiness, just waiting to ruin someone's day...



closeup of sweet facial patterns and coloration:






hope you enjoyed!!!


i'll try to check back next week to see if she's shed yet and will update this thread.
 

the toe cutter

Arachnobaron
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Mar 20, 2010
Messages
424
Excellent C. willardi! They're populations are stable its their preferred habitat that places them in the most difficult to find in the wild category, the crotalus crown jewel! 4 of the 5 subspecies are listed as little concern, but the C willardi obscurus is listed as threatened in the US. So I'd make sure of the subspecies if I were your friend unless he has the necessary paperwork and licenses in order. Good pics!
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
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Aug 15, 2005
Messages
268
The C. willardi took me by surprise for a second. I know them as the threatened species here in AZ. Wasn't aware of the subspecies situation. Good looking rattler whatever the case.
 

Alejandro45

Arachnosquire
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May 22, 2009
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114
Wow C. willardi are certainly gorgeous and the other Mexican subspecies are also amazing reptiles. Congratulations on those amazing snakes. And yes those are perfect cages for both species!
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
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Nov 21, 2009
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733
Wow again, My study of Crotalids with exception of brief glances at material on western spp has been all eastern. Last I checked (admittedly years ago) C. willardi was the rarest rattlesnake on earth. Good to see that inaccessability to habitat was the reason for this designation moreso than destruction of habitat- and that at least some pops are stable. Outstanding little snakes! :clap::cool:

While we're at it with some pros on the subject, how are pops of banded and mottled rock doing?

Terry
 

Widowman10

Arachno WIDOW
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Jan 25, 2007
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yeah, he told me it's crotalus willardi willardi, which that population is listed as least concern. definitely a beauty!

and from what i've read on the web, it's the same situation with the others. some subspecies pops are booming, whereas others are a little low. all depends on what subspecies you are looking at.
 

neubii18

Arachnosquire
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Dec 14, 2009
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74
do you keep crolatus sp. too?what age do you think is appropriate to start keeping hots.i'm 14,and i really want to get into rattlers,but i don't want to start to early,but i would like to start a little young so i have lots of experience when i am a lot older and can keep gaboons and rhino vipers.great pics,and those are some sweet cages!
 

Widowman10

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well that would be a heated debate (age/hots). check your local laws before diving into anything. also, i might wait. not saying you are (because i don't know you!), but a lot of young people are immature and irresponsible.

regardless of that, it is very wise to have a mentor that you observe dealing with hots. after logging hundreds of hours and practicing, then you can decide for yourself. best to get a lot of practice and time. one little tiny mistake can ruin your life in more ways than one.
 

Jaymz Bedell

Arachnoknight
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Dec 19, 2009
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do you keep crolatus sp. too?what age do you think is appropriate to start keeping hots.i'm 14,and i really want to get into rattlers,but i don't want to start to early,but i would like to start a little young so i have lots of experience when i am a lot older and can keep gaboons and rhino vipers.great pics,and those are some sweet cages!
At 14 you are not legally an adult, if you get bitten you are not responsible in the eyes of the law, your parents and the person that sold you the snake are considered the responsible party. they are the ones that will suffer the repercussions. not to mention it could cause a lot of bad publicity for a hobby that is already under a lot of scrutiny. at 14 you would be hard pressed to find anyone willing to mentor you due to the liability factor. the point of maturity aside, and I can't comment on your maturity, at 14 you're not likely to have had much time keeping reptiles in general, let alone something that can cause disfigurement or death. wait until you are legally an adult, and when it comes to dealing with venomous reptiles that would be at least 18 sometimes 21 depending upon the laws in your state. do you even know if it's legal to keep venomous reptiles in your state? a lot of states require a permit IF they allow the keeping of venomous reptiles at all. do you know where the closest antivenin supply for the species you wish to keep is? this is important, hospitals do not stock antivenin for exotic species, and some don't stock antivenin at all. antivenin is extremely expensive, treating a snake bite is EXTREMELY expensive. do you know the protocols for snake bites? do you have a lockable, escape proof, room to house them in? these are very general questions, but they are a reality of responsible venomous snake keeping. so are lockable, escape proof cages of an appropriate size to allow you to work safely. do you know any board certified reptile vets that will work with venomous reptiles? a lot of reptile vets won't even consider taking on venomous reptiles as patients. I admire that you're asking questions first, but the reality is at 14 you are not legally an adult, no responsible venomous reptile dealer will sell you a venomous snake. notice I said responsible, there are A LOT of dealers out there that don't care if you're 25 or 15. unfortunately they do a great disservice to our beloved hobby. this is long winded I know, but critical points when it comes to being a responsible venomous keeper. do lots of research, talk to as many responsible venomous keepers as you can, and when the time comes you will be much better prepared. you've got at least 4 years before you can legally purchase, that's a decent amount of time to lay a ground work of working with noon-venomous reptiles and researching the husbandry of venomous reptiles. I hope you don't take this as a bashing or attack, it's not at all meant that way, but I am very passionate about reptiles and responsible pet ownership in general. and as a side note, a lot of crotalids are every bit as dangerous as Gaboons and Rhino vipers.

to the OP...GORGEOUS! I had to wipe a little drool off of my chin from the willardi! you almost make me miss keeping venomous. I often forget exactly how gorgeous willardi are because I don't get to see them often. thank you for the pics.
 

Widowman10

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Jan 25, 2007
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well, i guess yesterday was the day. s/he popped out of the old skin, and is very beautiful! here's a couple of pics i snapped:







 
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