critique my setups/care info for my coming spiders

Edan bandoot

Arachnobaron
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Alright this is my second rodeo with this sort of thread, hopefully better this time (with pictures !!!).
I aim for these threads to be able to be used as reference for future keepers who search similar information so keep that in mind while correcting/adding information/anecdotes.

Terrestrials

my sling enclosures for terrestrial spiders, keeps it simple. If you use these make sure to use two elastics in case one breaks (I had the happen once)
1slingpot.jpg
This is the sort of enclosure i use when my terrestrial slings get larger and stop digging elaborate burrows, i also have a terrestrial enclosure style that uses the same jar as the arboreal setups, just with 75% substrate.
1terr.jpg

Pseudhapalopus sp. yellow-blue
Substrate Moisture: damp
Potential Size: 5" (not a dwarf apparently)
Venom: likely not significant
Ventilation: average ventilation
speed/temperament: I've heard they are fast and skittish.


Tliltocatl albopilosus
Substrate Moisture: moisten and let it dry out on top
Potential Size: 5.5"-6.5"
Venom: likely not significant
Ventilation: average
speed/temperament: i have 3 of these and they've all been calm as a cucumber


NW Arboreals (psalmo)
This is the sort of enclosure i use for my NW arboreals, i've found that tapis and psalmos tend to make web tunnels around the base of the corkbark. I have the bark setup more horizontal than in my old world enclosures.
1psalmo.jpg

Psalmopoeus pulcher
Substrate Moisture
: keep it moist
Potential Size: 5"-6"
Venom: not medically significant, but painful ( extreme burning sensation associated with tapi, and psalmo venom)
Ventilation: average ventilation
speed/temperament: Fast but fairly calm in my experience, likely to retreat back to hide rather than display any defensive behavior.

OW Arboreals (ornithoctoninae)
My old world arboreal enclosures are a lot like my new world arboreal except I set the cork bark up to favor verticality more.
1ow.jpg

Ornithoctoninae sp. Hatihati
Substrate Moisture: keep it moist
Potential Size: 7"-8"
Venom: possibly medically significant, and very painful.
Ventilation: higher than average
speed/temperament: fast and more likely to exhibit defensive behavior than a NW but would still rather hide than fight.


Omothymus schioetdei
Substrate Moisture: keep it moist
Potential Size: 8"-9"
Venom: possibly medically significant, and extremely painful
Ventilation: higher than average
speed/temperament: fast and more likely to exhibit defensive behavior than a NW but would still rather hide than fight.


Viridasius sp. Madagascar ( yes i know its a true spider not a tarantula)
Substrate Moisture: keep it moist
Potential Size: 5"-6"
Venom: Not likely to be medically significant
Ventilation: higher than average
speed/temperament: blindingly fast and extremely skittish, very unlikely to exhibit defensive behavior

Notes: I'm thinking about keeping this in one of the psalmo style enclosures that I have.



Ephebopus
I've read conflicting information on E.cyanognathus and need some clarification here. I read that they are arboreal as slings and fossorial as adults, is this true? If it is my sling will be going in one of the New world arboreal enclosures with a little bit more sub if it wants to burrow.

Ephebopus cyanognathus
Substrate Moisture: keep it moist
Potential Size: 4.5"-5"
Venom: unlikely to be medically significant
Ventilation: average
speed/temperament: skittish and fast


That concludes my thread PLEASE correct any information that's incorrect or unclear, anecdotes about the species in question would also be helpful.
Thanks for reading :)
 

Matts inverts

Arachnolord
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Why do you have plastic rap for the slings. Couldn’t you get the lids for them?
 

Matts inverts

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I always use the lids because mine try to climb so it’s more sturdy. I will consider this next sling I get.
 

BoyFromLA

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Slings can easily tear plastic wrap cover, and pushes it’s body through.
 

Edan bandoot

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Slings can easily tear plastic wrap cover, and pushes it’s body through.
although possible i use them for terrestrial slings only and try to use the thickest plastic wrap available. It is currently my best option.
 

BoyFromLA

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although possible i use them for terrestrial slings only and try to use the thickest plastic wrap available. It is currently my best option.
Even terrestrial slings are / can be very adventurous, oh yes they are / can. :troll:
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnobaron
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So what’s your deal with lids? Do you have the wrong lids with cups?
Yep and I've not been able to find any cups with lids in the past half a year

so no complaints on whats goin on with the bugs, just the lids?

The lids are a completely reasonable complaint, im just not currently in the circumstance to fix it.
 
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RoachCoach

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If the plastic wrap works for lids and you haven't had and escape, then the cheaper the better. Just don't do it with significant venom species. If you have mammal pets I would highly suggest you adopt mesh waffle lids. The thing that gets me is the high heel "container store" with the shoe/boot lid. That gives me way more pause than the clingwrap lids.
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnobaron
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If the plastic wrap works for lids and you haven't had and escape, then the cheaper the better. Just don't do it with significant venom species. If you have mammal pets I would highly suggest you adopt mesh waffle lids. The thing that gets me is the high heel "container store" with the shoe/boot lid. That gives me way more pause than the clingwrap lids.
Not too sure what you meant with the high heels, but I won't judge 😉

I'm not much of a mammals guy, too much maintenance
 

RoachCoach

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Not too sure what you meant with the high heels, but I won't judge 😉

I'm not much of a mammals guy, too much maintenance
 

Edan bandoot

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Whats wrong with em, ive never seen them in person
 

RoachCoach

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Whats wrong with em, ive never seen them in person
Didn't realize yours don't have the holes like TCS does. The 2nd picture. The build is nice but the lid that just sits on top. I assume you are mid build since it doesn't have any ventilation.
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnobaron
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Didn't realize yours don't have the holes like TCS does. The 2nd picture. The build is nice but the lid that just sits on top. I assume you are mid build since it doesn't have any ventilation.
Second picture is a small critter keeper with the top off
 

The Grym Reaper

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NW Arboreals (psalmo)
This is the sort of enclosure i use for my NW arboreals, i've found that tapis and psalmos tend to make web tunnels around the base of the corkbark. I have the bark setup more horizontal than in my old world enclosures.
OW Arboreals (ornithoctoninae)
My old world arboreal enclosures are a lot like my new world arboreal except I set the cork bark up to favor verticality more.
I just set up all non-Avic arboreals pretty much exactly the same way (more like your OW style but with more plant cover around the base of the bark), the only thing that differs between species is the amount of moisture used.

Non Avic setup 3.jpg

Psalmopoeus pulcher
Substrate Moisture
: keep it moist
speed/temperament: Fast but fairly calm in my experience, likely to retreat back to hide rather than display any defensive behavior.
They're pretty drought-tolerant so just overflowing the water dish as needed is fine.
I've owned 3 of them and they've all been skittish/defensive.

Ornithoctoninae sp. Hatihati
Substrate Moisture: keep it moist
Potential Size: 7"-8"
Venom: possibly medically significant, and very painful.
Ventilation: higher than average
speed/temperament: fast and more likely to exhibit defensive behavior than a NW but would still rather hide than fight.


Omothymus schioetdei
Substrate Moisture: keep it moist
Potential Size: 8"-9"
Venom: possibly medically significant, and extremely painful
Ventilation: higher than average
speed/temperament: fast and more likely to exhibit defensive behavior than a NW but would still rather hide than fight.
For ventilation you just need holes on the sides above sub level and some holes in the lid to keep good air circulation, all that adding additional holes beyond this will achieve is drying out the enclosure faster. The enclosures pictured above only have a single row of holes above sub level on three sides and some holes in the lids and I've had no issues raising Psalmopoeinae/Ornithoctoninae/Poecilotheria in them.

I read that they are arboreal as slings and fossorial as adults, is this true?
This was my experience with my male, I'd also read this so I gave him both options, he basically lived as an arboreal in a J-shaped web tube until about 1" - 1.5" and then burrowed after that.
 

Edan bandoot

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Well I received all my spiders today (other than the hati.hati, which died prior to shipping and was replaced with my second Sericopelma sp Santa Catalina) and they were all incredibly easy to house.

The E.cyanognathus was a little bit stubborn getting out of the paper towel, but the only one that bolted was the T.albo freebie. Little bugger was running laps.

I think this is testament to how easy things can be with patience.
 
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