Cricket eggs and something else in pokie enclosure

Jake94

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 6, 2016
Messages
20
Hey, so I spotted some cricket eggs in my pokie enclosure today. I pulled out the surrounding dirt, and put a clump of the eggs under my very basic microscope. I took a picture, but you'll only be able to see the cricket eggs. What I can also see are little worms that are like 1/100th the size of the eggs moving around through the dirt.

http://imgur.com/a/FHmZk

Is this an immediate rehouse? Is the cork bark safe or no? Are these things benign? :(

Here is actually a picture where one of the worms is visible, if you can find it:

http://imgur.com/a/kQpBW

It's where the two eggs that are intersecting, on the top right of the bottom left egg. : /

Just a clear worm looking creature.
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
115
The worm-looking things could possibly be nematodes. I don't have any experience with them, but I can't imagine what else it could possibly be. If you're unsure, it's best to err on the side of caution and do a complete rehouse (imo). Definitely interested to hear what others have to say about this one.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
What substrate were you using?

I'd rehouse if only to get rid of those cricket eggs.

You could boil, microwave, or bake the corkbark. No need to toss it out, just sterilize it.
 

Jake94

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 6, 2016
Messages
20
It's just coco fiber in the enclosure. Nematodes sound likely- are they problematic? I'm wondering if they're presence (whatevery they are) is an indication of moisture level.

I did get the cricket eggs out that I saw, but I wouldn't be surprised if there were some more in other parts of the enclosure. I thought I'd been careful to snip the ovipositor off any crickets, but obviously I missed one. I guess I'm going to do a rehouse in the next day or two. Thanks for the thoughts :)
 

Robyn8

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 24, 2016
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195
I don't want to sound dramatic but as far as i know, a nematode infection is a death sentence for your T. if there are nematodes in there, change substrate ASAP.
 

Robyn8

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Feb 24, 2016
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195
To add, nematodes are parasitic worms, an infection in a Tarantula will result them massing in the chelicerae, so the T is unable to feed.
 

Jake94

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Jul 6, 2016
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I don't want to sound dramatic but as far as i know, a nematode infection is a death sentence for your T. if there are nematodes in there, change substrate ASAP.
Oh no! :( Well I got her out of there. I just read that only half of all nematodes are parasitic, so s/he has a chance. I wonder how the suckers got in there? Hitched a ride on a feeder probably? Man what a bummer. Thanks for the info though. What a stupid thing for my T to potentially get killed by : /

Edit: Oh wait, more than half are parasitic. Dang. Would a molt free her of them? Probably not right?
 
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Marijan2

Arachnobaron
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
505
Oh no! :( Well I got her out of there. I just read that only half of all nematodes are parasitic, so s/he has a chance. I wonder how the suckers got in there? Hitched a ride on a feeder probably? Man what a bummer. Thanks for the info though. What a stupid thing for my T to potentially get killed by : /

Edit: Oh wait, more than half are parasitic. Dang. Would a molt free her of them? Probably not right?
i think you are overworrying, there are microparasites everywhere, in fact, it would be weird if there are no microfauna in the soil. only small percentage infests tarantulas, and they usually come with WC animals
 
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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
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Dec 25, 2014
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5,689
Just rehouse your Theraphosidae, Jake94. And an eye to ventilation & humidity.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
There are literally

i think you are overworrying, there are microparasites everywhere, in fact, it would be weird if there are no microfauna in the soil. only small percentage infests tarantulas, and they usually come with WC animals
That's why I asked what substrate he was using. I'd be very surprised not to see microscopic organisms in soil. Maybe not coco fiber. But i can't rule out cross contamination into any enclosure from feeders or from introduction of springtails and/or isopods.
 

Jake94

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 6, 2016
Messages
20
Well I've been doing a lot of googling, and it seems that nematodes have been killing tarantulas for quite some time. There's a lot of information, but it seems like there isn't a reliable cure yet. I've noticed what I now think may be Phorid flies, which are documented as being transmitters of nematodes. Fortunately, none of my tarantulas are currently showing symptoms of infestation, so it's possible that the nematodes I've found are not parasitic
There are literally

i think you are overworrying, there are microparasites everywhere, in fact, it would be weird if there are no microfauna in the soil. only small percentage infests tarantulas, and they usually come with WC animals
You mean I can stop researching nematodes and messing with my spiders and start working on my homework? I don't knooow...

Haha. You're definitely right. I thought that maybe these things were just one of those "Side effects of living on the planet Earth" type deals at first, but then I assumed worst case scenario once I learned of the nematode disasters involving tarantulas. I'm finishing up a rehouse now, about to microwave the cork bark and add a few more ventilation holes while I'm at it. Thanks for the peace of mind, and I'll update if anything spooky happens.
 

Ron Robbins Jr

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 29, 2016
Messages
9
I had some crickets breed in one of my tarantula tanks once.. Had little baby crickets everywhere before I knew it. I just rehoused her, I think it's probably bad, hordes of baby crickets would probably try eating a lazy rose hair.
 
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