Could use some clarification...

Tux

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Mar 13, 2017
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I'm an amateur at looking after T's. I own a common pink toe and she is fine.
my dad wanted to give it at go so today he bought a "Southern Horned Tarantula". after bringing it home we found out it could be a baboon tarantula. could use guidance on housing, venom, feed ect. because I'm not too confident at looking after an old word T. BTW he doesn't want to get rid of it... he wold like to persist with looking after it.
 

nicodimus22

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Please post some photos of it so we can ID it properly (scientific name of the genus and species) and then advise you on care.
 

Tux

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This is the best photos i can take as the T is hudled in the corner. it has a rear facing horn if that helps. IMAG0306.jpg IMAG0305.jpg
 

johnny quango

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As @nicodimus22 stated it's better to use scientific names and post a picture if possible. It sounds like you have a Ceratogyrus darlingi I've never kept this species but some members on here actually recommend this species as a step into ow tarantulas although not as a 1st tarantula but what's done is done you seem to already know about venom, speed etc so best advice be careful and don't take risks
 

Vezon

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Probably C. darlingi. Luckily it is probably one of the easier old worlds to keep. Just keep it in a container with inches (7-8) of dirt with a water dish and it will be fine.
 

Tux

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As @nicodimus22 stated it's better to use scientific names and post a picture if possible. It sounds like you have a Ceratogyrus darlingi I've never kept this species but some members on here actually recommend this species as a step into ow tarantulas although not as a 1st tarantula but what's done is done you seem to already know about venom, speed etc so best advice be careful and don't take risks
Thanks, i usually scour this site before i buy... hence my pink toe. i wont take risks. thanks for the support.
 

Tux

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Mar 13, 2017
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Probably C. darlingi. Luckily it is probably one of the easier old worlds to keep. Just keep it in a container with inches (7-8) of dirt with a water dish and it will be fine.
will do, thanks. would you recommend handling? personally I'd say no but my dad wants to get over his fear of T's. this is the reason he got it
 

darkness975

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will do, thanks. would you recommend handling? personally I'd say no but my dad wants to get over his fear of T's. this is the reason he got it
Not trying to sound mean, so please don't take this that way, but handling an OW Tarantula is not a good idea for anyone, least of all someone with a fear of spiders. I am not suggesting that you get rid of it, but rather use a different species that is less potent and slower going if the intent is to use it as a sort of "therapy spider." OW species are lightning fast, defensive, have notably potent venom, and often unpredictable. It is a bad combination for someone who is already leery about spiders.

Once you establish a proper set up for the one you have there, I would let it be and keep it like a fish (hands off admiration only).

If you would like to get a spider for the specific purpose of overcoming a Spider fear, there are a lot of beginner species that can be acquired that would help with that and we can suggest some good ones for you. Look up @EulersK videos on good beginner Tarantula species.
 

Tux

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Mar 13, 2017
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Thanks for that. No hard feelings taken. Spoken to dad and he doesn't want it. I have a common pink toe he can hold. A huge thanks to everyone for their in-put. I now own a OW T! Thanks again
 

GreyPsyche

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I'll agree with everyone here. I'd keep the T though, it's gorgeous. I wouldn't handle it. Looks like C darlingi. Provide lots of sub, I like top soil and a little peat moss. After it burrows it should settle in nicely. It most likely won't be much trouble after that but always take precaution as it is OW, fast and hot. Good luck, man! Gorgeous T.
 

cold blood

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This is the best photos i can take as the T is hudled in the corner. it has a rear facing horn if that helps. View attachment 240860 View attachment 240861
Yes that would be C. darlingi. Where the heck southern horned comes from is...I dunno...hilarious.

Its a good beginner OW, but not a good beginner t as its fast and has strong venom and a willingness to use it. The good thing is that when housed properly, they are easy to keep and unlike most fossorials, its frequently out and visible.

Theyre very good eaters and grow at a decent, but not fast pace.

Hold it, and you will likely either be looking for a missing t, or headed to the ER. Never handle an OW.

Thanks for that. No hard feelings taken. Spoken to dad and he doesn't want it. I have a common pink toe he can hold. A huge thanks to everyone for their in-put. I now own a OW T! Thanks again
Pink toes may be better for handling, but theyre still a poor choice...for two big reasons...the first is that they jump...often without warning...this can either kill the spider, or having you chase a spider. Also theyre known as poop cannons for a reason...you don't want your home sprayed, or your face...its impressive how well they seem to be able to aim.

Slower NW terrestrials would be a better choice...something like P. scrofa, Euthlus sp. red or even a G. pulchripes would be better choices.
But even then, handling isn't something to make a habit of long term.
 

GreyPsyche

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I second what cold blood just said. I have a versi sling that climbed up my paint brush and onto my palm while my gf was cleaning out her enclosure of meal worm remains. She launched herself off in an impressive leap right into the catch up I had in my other hand. I mean it was intense, of course I had everything prepared for that scenario except my mind, neeedless to say it was blown, lol. The jumping ability was phenomenal. Anyways, NW Ts are definitely what your dad needs in his life. I recommend a GBB but I'm unsure if that's what your dad would be into because of its speed and skittishness. Although mine has been a big web potato, literally only moves when it's webbing or I move it by taking off the lid or trying to remove something from its web lol.
 

Tux

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Mar 13, 2017
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Thanks for the info. ive had my pink toe for a while and had no problem so far. ill remain carful though and not touch the C. darlingi but i will keep it. it will be an experience looking after one. kinda anoyed that we got miss-sold a tarantula. the shop assistant told us it was safe and docile. ah well such is life...
 

Tux

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Mar 13, 2017
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Thanks for the info. ive had my pink toe for a while and had no problem so far. ill remain carful though and not touch the C. darlingi but i will keep it. it will be an experience looking after one. kinda anoyed that we got miss-sold a tarantula. the shop assistant told us it was safe and docile. ah well such is life...
 

nicodimus22

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the shop assistant told us it was safe and docile.
Even if you're not going to return the T, I would go there again and let them know that they sold you an animal that could put you in the ER. If you don't, they'll probably do this to other people, and eventually it will end badly for all. At the very least, the label on the Ts should also include the scientific name so that customers can research before buying.

If I was the shopkeeper and I was somehow ignorant as to what animals I was selling, I WOULD want to know that I'm setting myself up for a potential lawsuit by telling customers that these Ts are safe and docile. It is true that nobody yet has died from a tarantula bite, but people have had intense pain and cramping for weeks from OW bites, which is something that could make you unable to work, and put you through agonizing pain and suffering. In my opinion, if someone who already has some serious health issues was bitten by an OW, it could be fatal. All of this is grounds for legal action.
 
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