Cork bark

Valael

Arachnodemon
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If I'm unable to get cork bark (No petstores in the area sell it), are just glass walls ok? Heh. I know it's not the best set up, but hey..Even the zoo (St. Louis Zoo) has Avic. urticans with just a few thin sticks and fake vines. (And living communally, if I remember correctly.)


If not, what about logs from trees? They're bug free, I know that much, I've had them sitting around in my house from previous animals for quite a while. Or drift wood?
 

Vayu Son

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><

Alot of T's wont touch the hides provided, but its nice to give them some options. Check out holleys fish pic, and be creative.


-V
 

Code Monkey

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You can get cork bark here: http://corkstore.com/product_list.html shipped to your door for a bout half of what pet stores would charge.

The reasoning behind cork bark is that it doesn't rot, won't mold unless you are keeping things REALLY moist, and is light enough that you can get really creative at constructing hides without worrying about the weight of the tank or it falling and harming your Ts.

However, PVC pipe and/or pipe insulation cut into sections will suit your T just as well and is even cheaper still, just not so natural looking.
 

MrT

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Valael,
That St Louis zoo, is one kick ass zoo. Don't you think? :D :D

E
 

Valael

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It's not bad at all. I was suprised to see they have a fairly decent sized Pokie there. Made me want mine to grow up even more.
 

Joy

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Originally posted by MrT
Valael,
That St Louis zoo, is one kick ass zoo. Don't you think? :D :D

E
I was very impressed by their Insectarium when I visited there a couple of years ago, but concerned to see:

1) cactus in the B. smithi vivarium

2) No water dish for the A. moderatum

3) A P. imperator kept in desert conditions.

I wrote them a polite letter about these concerns, and I'd be interested to know if any of them have been attended to since then.

Joy
 

Code Monkey

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For the planters, obviously pieces. The rest of it appears to be sold by the foot length (hence the statements 1 foot = approximately XX pounds).
 

MrDeranged

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Originally posted by Code Monkey
For the planters, obviously pieces. The rest of it appears to be sold by the foot length (hence the statements 1 foot = approximately XX pounds).
Actually, I believe that they sell it by the pound. I think the statement is there so that if you order 1 pound, you know that you'll get about 1 sq foot of surface areas worth of cork bark.

Scott
 

Code Monkey

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Originally posted by mrderanged
Actually, I believe that they sell it by the pound. I think the statement is there so that if you order 1 pound, you know that you'll get about 1 sq foot of surface areas worth of cork bark.

Scott
Hmmm... could be. I suppose we can comfort ourselves in that the issue is largely academic since 1 sq foot = 0.92 lbs.
 

Valael

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I can't say I payed much attention to the enclosures, I was too busy looking at the spider. But I'm almost certain their emporers are still in a desert setting.


And while we're on the subject, being a person who doesn't own a scorpion or even knows much about them, are you saying emporers aren't desert animals? If so, just what are they?



I'm asking because a petstore in the area has emporers on that reptile litter (the big sand stuff) with a piece of fake drift wood, and I THINK they even have a basking light on them. Being ignorant of scorpions, I just assumed it was the right set up.


Except one detail, one day, one of their females looked dead (pinchers/claws/whateverthetechnicaltermis were laying in a really odd position and the legs were sort of sprawled out.) So I asked if he was even sure if it was alive. He proceeded to spray water in there with a mister, and filling up it's water dish (bottle cap) in the process. It ended up drinking 2 full caps worth of water.
 
U

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Originally posted by Valael
I can't say I payed much attention to the enclosures, I was too busy looking at the spider. But I'm almost certain their emporers are still in a desert setting.


And while we're on the subject, being a person who doesn't own a scorpion or even knows much about them, are you saying emporers aren't desert animals? If so, just what are they?



They're native to rain forests, poor things. I hate to think how many of them die because the people who buy them (and the pet shops that sell them) assume all scorps are desert animals.

Joy
 

Wade

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I suspect that the adults, who no longer molt, manage to survive, albiet miserably, in dry containers.

My first pet arachnid (about 12-13 years ago) was a Heterometrus sp. (annother forest dweller) and I was told it was from the desert and to keep it on gravel! No good books, and no websites, out at the time :( . She had babies, but of course none made it. She, however, did. I did eventually learn the correct way to house them, and she lived several more years.

Wade
 
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