Containment Facility Guidelines

isopodgeek

Arachnosquire
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I filled out a 526 PPQ Permit this past Wednesday. I put in all of the Isopods and Millipedes I wish to keep, breed and sell. Yesterday, I found out that I need a Containment Facility set up for some of the exotic isopods and millipedes on my permit. I know that it could be up to 6 months down the road until my Containment Facility will be inspected and registered but I want to prepared when the time comes. I was reading and found information about Containment Facilities but still have questions. I know these might sound like dumb questions but I really need the answers.

1. Can the Containment Facility be a room in an apartment?
2. How long does the inspection take?
3. What is the difference between a Full and cafe inspection( what are these)?
4. How do I know if I need a Full or a Cafe inspection?
5. I tried contacting the number on the bottom of the page talking about the Containment Facility and it didn't work. What is the contact number( if this question is not allowed to be answered, don't answer it)?
 

RoachCoach

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For the first question I would worry more about what your landlord or renter had to say about running a business out of a unit. Small scale you will be good, but anything bigger and you will either have to end up bribing someone(not legal) or finding the correct location for your operation.
 

isopodgeek

Arachnosquire
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For the first question I would worry more about what your landlord or renter had to say about running a business out of a unit. Small scale you will be good, but anything bigger and you will either have to end up bribing someone(not legal) or finding the correct location for your operation.
We own the apartment so that isn't a problem. Do you know the answers to any of the other questions?
 

goliathusdavid

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I do not know answers to all of these questions, but can provide answers to a couple.
1. I think a room in an apartment could theoretically function, but this is really a case by case basis. It depends on the species you are housing and what USDA\APHIS deems the risk to be. The ABSOLUTE MINIMUM generally required would be a single entry point, with a two door system (vestibule) with well sealing doors.
2, 3. @Arthroverts do you know anything about this? I know you have had inspections before and am I wrong to say you possess a containment facility? Also does anyone legally keeping exotic phasmids or leps know the answer to this question?
4. Sorry, no idea on this one. Maybe try contacting a local representative about it?

I'm going to be honest, containment facilities are a huge pain. Having worked in institutions with them I know how much work they can be. Not to mention costly if renovations are required. This is why I personally, (as with most hobbyists) tend to stay away from species that require them.

Finally, just out of curiosity, what millipede species are you planning to acquire that require containment facilities? A great many exotic Diploploda require permits but not a facility as millipedes aren't exactly known for their escape tendencies...
 

The Snark

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It depends on the species you are housing and what USDA\APHIS deems the risk to be. The ABSOLUTE MINIMUM generally required would be a single entry point, with a two door system (vestibule) with well sealing doors.
I remember this one from our certified facility at the nature center. Depends on what is confined, or course, and foot traffic must be severely restricted and monitored. I was given the impression a home brew affair made from normal human habitation is extremely unlikely to certify. Seems our resident expert who certified, @Najakeeper hasn't been around for quite a while.
 

wizentrop

to the rescue!
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Speaking as someone who works with such permits (though not in the US), a containment facility can never be a part of a residence (so a room is a no). It has to be detached, with its own entrance. A room inside another facility complex (that is not used for residence) is an exception as long as it fulfills other requirements, such as double doors, single entry, and filtered vents.
Similarly, an apartment can never be used as a containment facility because it is not detached from the building.
 

goliathusdavid

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USDA\APHIS has allowed residential containment facilities in the past (I know a couple people with them) but the requirements are so strict that almost no one can fulfill them. Those exceptions are usually only made for people associated with a scientific institution, though its not unheard of to have an exception made for a business. That said, as @wizentrop stated, double doors, single entry, and filtered vents are a bare minimum. It also is going to be dependent on what you are keeping, good luck trying to get one for Macropanesthia rhinoceros or most phasmids.
 

goliathusdavid

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It's also just important to remember that all of this red tape and regulations serve a critical purpose. These rules can be frustrating, infuriating, and confusing, but they are here to protect both agriculture and people. And frankly, it would be amazing to see greater regulation of exotic vertebrates, especially considering the epidemiological factors involved. Let's not forget that in some states it is easier to own a tiger, than to adopt a kitten. That's not freedom, that's a profound failure of government regulation. The best and safest wildlife trade is almost always the one that is regulated. Not over regulated, but one that protects both people and wildlife.

My campaign launches next year;)
 

Arthroverts

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I keep mentioning it, but in my thread on obtaining a PPQ526 for millipedes (and isopods), I note that I have a residential bedroom as a containment facility, one entrance but no vestibule, with a door sweep and screening over the window and vent. Depending on what you are trying to a containment facility for and a few other factors, I have found that it is completely attainably to be approved for one for arguably the majority of enthusiasts.

I will hopefully respond to the other questions here soon.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

isopodgeek

Arachnosquire
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Thank you all so much for helping me out. From what I understand, a bedroom might work but doesn’t sound ideal. At the current moment, I think I will just keep, breed (if the species breeds) and sell species not requiring a containment facility. Maybe in the future after collage (I am still in High school) when I can buy a place of my own, I will apply for a Containment Facility.
 

The Snark

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@isopodgeek It seems to me that licensed / certified containments are very much like writing grants. The complexities involved in dealing with the various authorities and their constantly changing rules almost requires a person to keep up with them at least as a part time occupation. I'm doing this comparison - analogy for a reason. I wrote a grant once for a fully qualified fire department recipient. 3 months and around 10 rewrites and resubmissions later with some office clerk vetting my final effort it skated through. Then as unluck would have it a neighboring fire department wanted to write a very similar grant and asked for my assistance. Having learned from the past I simply engaged a grant writing service. 3 days collecting info, a couple of days getting data accurized and 10 days later the grant was approved.
Bottom line, bone up. Familiarize yourself with all the regulations well in advance. At the very least you will avoid barking up the wrong trees. That is, get the info from the horses mouth. Go straight to the red tape specialists and wade in. Get the low downs from the ones who will ultimately be giving you the green light.
 

isopodgeek

Arachnosquire
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@isopodgeek It seems to me that licensed / certified containments are very much like writing grants. The complexities involved in dealing with the various authorities and their constantly changing rules almost requires a person to keep up with them at least as a part time occupation. I'm doing this comparison - analogy for a reason. I wrote a grant once for a fully qualified fire department recipient. 3 months and around 10 rewrites and resubmissions later with some office clerk vetting my final effort it skated through. Then as unluck would have it a neighboring fire department wanted to write a very similar grant and asked for my assistance. Having learned from the past I simply engaged a grant writing service. 3 days collecting info, a couple of days getting data accurized and 10 days later the grant was approved.
Bottom line, bone up. Familiarize yourself with all the regulations well in advance. At the very least you will avoid barking up the wrong trees. That is, get the info from the horses mouth. Go straight to the red tape specialists and wade in. Get the low downs from the ones who will ultimately be giving you the green light.
That is what I have been doing for the last 5 weeks. I now understand all of the regulation dealing with invertebrates at the current moment. Sounds like a containment facility is a lot of work. I don’t think I can do school and have a containment facility at the same time. Thank you.
 

goliathusdavid

Arachnoknight
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@Arthoverts Just reread your thread on PPQ 526's for millipedes (I don't even know what time this is:) ) and realized I had neglected to see in your SOP that they approved you without a vestibule. I was under the assumption that this was a minimum requirement. Apologies to all for misspeaking.
 
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