Concerned about OBT sling

Zyranne

Arachnopeon
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May 21, 2016
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Hello, I recently bought an OBT sling online. After a day of being in my care it seems to have built a kind of 'mat' around itself, as if it had enclosed itself inside the web. I wanted to check if it was ok, as I'm new to this behaviour. I prodded it with some tweezers and was unresponsive the first couple of prods, but then it darted off, and I had to recapture it.

I want to add that at first I thought it was dead, if that's any indication of how lethargic it was.

Should I be concerned? should I build an ICU for it?
 

EulersK

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Feb 22, 2013
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Oh boy. I take it this is your first tarantula? Please ask plenty of questions :)

First thing's first. Prodding an animal will tell you nothing of its well-being, and this is especially true with tarantulas. During the time that they are healthy and growing (known as a molt), they will become wildly lethargic. More on that later. In the future, if the tarantula has barricaded itself in a burrow/web, that is a massive Do Not Disturb sign. Leave it alone.

Moving on, this is an arid species. It's about the driest species you can buy - even slings prefer bone dry substrate. Never provide more than a water dish for humidity. For slings, drop some water droplets onto the webbing to provide drinking water. That being said, learn to hate an ICU. By definition, an ICU is an environment approaching 100% humidity. Great for dehydrated spiders (which is actually quite rare, given you provide a water dish), potentially lethal for anything else. Especially with an arid species such as this.

Okay, now about your species. OBT stands for Orange Baboon Tarantula. Those in the hobby call it Orange Bitey Thing, and for very good reason. This is one of the most defensive tarantulas you can buy, and it has the venom to back it up. You'll be in a world of pain from a bite. Note that the venom potency is true for all baboon tarantulas. Unfortunately for you, this is also one of the fastest growing species in the hobby. Males can mature in under a year, females in two years. It will outgrow your experience by tenfold.

Contrary to what you might read, this is not a "semi-arboreal" species (note that there is no such thing). In reality, it is actually a burrowing species. Even as adults, provide at least 1x dls (diagonal leg span) of substrate, and preferably more than 2x. It is also a very heavy webber, so provide webbing anchor points int he form of chop sticks stuck into the substrate. Finally, given how defensive this spider is, it is in your best interest to provide it with a larger enclosure. Slings and young juveniles are very flighty, meaning they'd rather run and hide over standing to fight. Right around the 2.5" mark, they switch that up and begin to stand their ground and even chase down an intruder. For my OBT's, I provide them an enclosure that will house an adult by the time they are 3". If they have a large enclosure, they're much less likely to bolt out of the cage.

On to molting, which is what your sling is likely doing. Given how quickly this spider grows, it's darn near always in premolt right up until the 2" mark. Your spider will likely molt within a few days. Here is a video on what to expect.

I have an entire series of videos on basic husbandry, I'd suggest that you check them out. Again, please ask questions! People are always willing to help.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
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Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
Exactly what @EulersK has said. He saved me an hour using google translating :rofl:

Please take his points on board and enjoy keeping your ginger hellbeast :D
 

Venom1080

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"semi-arboreal" species (note that there is no such thing). .
i dont really agree with that. what about Cyriopagopus, Psalmopoeus, Lampropelma, Poecilotheria, etc etc. the only genus i find thats usually fully arboreal is Avicularia.
 

EulersK

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i dont really agree with that. what about Cyriopagopus, Psalmopoeus, Lampropelma, Poecilotheria, etc etc. the only genus i find thats usually fully arboreal is Avicularia.
You forgot Heteroscodra ;) Just because they build dirt curtains or burrow in conjunction with a vertical cork slab doesn't make them any less of an arboreal. Their anatomy dictates their preference - long legs, streamlined bodies, massive tarsal claws. The way I see it, if they can treat vertical surfaces the same as a horizontal surface, then it's an arboreal. On top of that, at least with Poecilotheria, Heteroscodra, and Psalmopoeus, they largely abandon their terrestrial ways with age. They all burrow as slings (and some even as large juvies), but behavior as a small spider doesn't dictate the behavior as a large one. If that were the case, then all Brachypelmas would be obligate burrowers and housed like a Ceratogyrus.

Plus, as you know, the term "semi-arboreal" is usually applied to C. cyaneopubescens and P. murinus, both of which are far from being an arboreal. So I just hate the term outright.
 

Venom1080

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You forgot Heteroscodra ;) Just because they build dirt curtains or burrow in conjunction with a vertical cork slab doesn't make them any less of an arboreal. Their anatomy dictates their preference - long legs, streamlined bodies, massive tarsal claws. The way I see it, if they can treat vertical surfaces the same as a horizontal surface, then it's an arboreal. On top of that, at least with Poecilotheria, Heteroscodra, and Psalmopoeus, they largely abandon their terrestrial ways with age. They all burrow as slings (and some even as large juvies), but behavior as a small spider doesn't dictate the behavior as a large one. If that were the case, then all Brachypelmas would be obligate burrowers and housed like a Ceratogyrus.

Plus, as you know, the term "semi-arboreal" is usually applied to C. cyaneopubescens and P. murinus, both of which are far from being an arboreal. So I just hate the term outright.
well, IMO, if it has a hide on/under the ground but prefers to climb and spends most of its life above ground, its semi arboreal. a fully arboreal spider has a elevated hide, and spends most if not all of its time above ground.
some spiders are opportunistic, they make do with what ever conditions they have. id like to do a experiment one day and see what happens with a group(P murinus and GBB), half set up arboreal and half terrestrial/burrower. i saw a video of a dcf P murinus that was living half way up a tree, so who knows.
 

BobBarley

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Sep 16, 2015
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Plus, as you know, the term "semi-arboreal" is usually applied to C. cyaneopubescens and P. murinus, both of which are far from being an arboreal. So I just hate the term outright.
I think semi-arboreal applies mostly to Thrixopelma ockerti.
 

cold blood

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well, IMO, if it has a hide on/under the ground but prefers to climb and spends most of its life above ground, its semi arboreal. a fully arboreal spider has a elevated hide, and spends most if not all of its time above ground.
some spiders are opportunistic, they make do with what ever conditions they have. id like to do a experiment one day and see what happens with a group(P murinus and GBB), half set up arboreal and half terrestrial/burrower. i saw a video of a dcf P murinus that was living half way up a tree, so who knows.
Just because one is opportunistic, doesn't change who they are. I could adapt to living on a boat, or in a tree, but it doesn't mean I am no longer classified as a terrestrial, it just means I am adaptable.
 

Chris LXXIX

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@Zyranne

Size? (yeah I know you said sling, but). Pics of the set up? Upload a couple of pics if you can, it's always better, trust me... before thinking about ICU & stuff :-s
 

Venom1080

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Just because one is opportunistic, doesn't change who they are. I could adapt to living on a boat, or in a tree, but it doesn't mean I am no longer classified as a terrestrial, it just means I am adaptable.
id like to see a B smithi adapt. im just saying P murinus are a little different than the average terrestrial. and that semi arboreals are thing IMO.
 

cold blood

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im just saying P murinus are a little different than the average terrestrial. and that semi arboreals are thing IMO.
I agree, they are a little different.
They're more adaptable, it doesn't make them any less of a fossorial as a species.
 
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