communal research

D Sherlod

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Just starting some basic research. Does anyone know or have experience with any new world communal species.
so far the only species I have read about are M. balfour ,, but they are old world.
 

Flexzone

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There's Neoholothele incei but people have had a lot more success with communally keeping M. balfouri together.
 

D Sherlod

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I have heard mixed views on them being communal........some saying they are not
 

Trenor

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I've heard mixed reviews on Neoholothele incei with some doing ok and others ending poorly.

I've had two M.balfouri communal enclosures for a while and they have turned out great. I just sold a MM out of one so he can go breed. Three of the four in the other enclosure were out tonight while I was feeding.
 

D Sherlod

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That is awesome footage. OK they were on my wish list anyways. Time to start planning and researching
 

D Sherlod

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I've heard mixed reviews on Neoholothele incei with some doing ok and others ending poorly.

I've had two M.balfouri communal enclosures for a while and they have turned out great. I just sold a MM out of one so he can go breed. Three of the four in the other enclosure were out tonight while I was feeding.

I'm not sure a communal is a good way to start with old worlds. But good to know
 

Trenor

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I'm not sure a communal is a good way to start with old worlds. But good to know
Yeah, I wasn't suggesting you get a communal setup with M.balofuri. I was just stating they were the only ones I know to have a high success rate.

@EulersK had a Neoholothele incei communal till he ended up with just one fat T. Make sure you read up on them as I have seen more of these communals go bad than good. I have 7 of this species (5 olives and 2 golds) and they are great looking Ts. I don't keep them communally though.
 
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cold blood

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Yes, I have 4 together currently at about 1/2" in a deli cup. They have been in the deli cup for about 1 month, and all are very fat.

Here's footage of one molting upright & another one hovering next to it:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BQo0ozgBqrH/

At that size many species of slings can live communally...its no indicator of long term anything.

Incei communals last...until they don't.
 

EulersK

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At that size many species of slings can live communally...its no indicator of long term anything.

Incei communals last...until they don't.
My communal was with 1/2" specimens, and all molted once together. Then one went rogue, ate everyone, and promptly escaped. It was a bad week. Luckily I found her. Named her Hannibal.

Could it have been my fault? Sure, could have. Not sure where I went wrong, though. The enclosure was massive and there was more than enough food to go around. I think where I went wrong was keeping them communally in the first place.
 

viper69

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Incei have been observed to live communally in the wild. By communal I mean in very close quarters of each other.

Still haven't read reports of this observed w/ balfouri in the field.
 

D Sherlod

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One thing that I read indicated less space was important. When T's have the chance to create there own individual territory they will kill the trespassers. When kept close they don't get that way unless hungry.

It goes against everything we would think but does make some sense.

I'm guessing my course of action is to raise a pair and breed them. Raising some of the offspring in a communal setup.
That gives me years to research before risking lives.
 

cold blood

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One thing that I read indicated less space was important. When T's have the chance to create there own individual territory they will kill the trespassers. When kept close they don't get that way unless hungry.

It goes against everything we would think but does make some sense.

I'm guessing my course of action is to raise a pair and breed them. Raising some of the offspring in a communal setup.
That gives me years to research before risking lives.
best course of action is clearly to just house them seperately.
 

Red Eunice

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Still haven't read reports of this observed w/ balfouri in the field.
In the late 70's, during a military cruise, we passed the Socotra Island. U.S. military, at the time, was prohibited to set foot on it. A real shame, as many on board liked exploring outside the civilized areas when visiting foreign countries.

Using Google Earth, it has quite a bit of vegetation and a roadway of sorts around the perimeter. Would be nice to be able to observe and document the limited wildlife it has to offer.
Given its location, Middle East/African neighbors, we might be in for a long wait though.
 

Haksilence

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I have a communal of incei that started with 23 slings and the mother (she came with the slings for free) I saw no aggression from the slings but I know for a fact momma ate a few, so she was removed.

I estimate 18 are left at about 1.5"
 
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Nightstalker47

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I don't understand the appeal in keeping Ts in groups wether they are considered "communal" or not. Cost for housing is insignificant next to the price you payed for them.They are after all tarantulas and will tolerate each other in the early stages but things could go south at any given moment. Why risk it?
 

D Sherlod

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A group in a communal setting that don't just exist but actually benefit by being together is very enjoyable.
I wouldn't try a set up without knowing it will work. In the majority of life on this earth there are groups that are loners and in the same genus ones that live in a communal setting. We know very little about T's in general. We do know that M balfour actually make good parents, pre killing prey and guarding young while they eat. So it's not unthinkable that other species would have other group dynamics.
 
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